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Thursday, November 26, 2020

Wendell Roelf News

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S.African Court Allows Livestock Ship to Sail amid Cruelty Concerns

A South African court ruled on Tuesday that a Kuwaiti firm could ship thousands of sheep to the Middle East, dealing a blow to animal welfare activists seeking to ban such exports on concerns that extreme heat could kill the animals en route.In the high court case, South Africa’s National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (NSPCA) sought an interim injunction to prevent Kuwaiti livestock exporter Al Mawashi from sailing a vessel loaded with sheep out of South Africa’s East London port.In papers filed with the court…

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CMA CGM to Impose Emergency Surcharge at Cape Town Port

CMA CGM, the world's fourth-largest container shipping line, will impose emergency congestion surcharges at Cape Town port in July due to disruptions caused by the coronavirus, it has told customers.From July 1 until further notice, it will impose a surcharge of $550 for 20-foot containers and reefers and a $1,100 surcharge for 40-foot containers and reefers, CMA said in the letter dated June 17 that was seen by Reuters.Western Cape province, which includes Cape Town, is the epicenter of South Africa's coronavirus outbreak…

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COVID-19: South Africa Bans Cruise Ships

South Africa banned all passenger vessels from its ports on Wednesday due to the coronavirus outbreak, leaving tourists on a cruise ship docked in Cape Town in limbo following tests for possible COVID-19 cases on board.The MV AidAmira's more than 1,700 passengers and crew have been unable to leave the ship since Monday, after a crew member on a cargo ship who shared a plane with six passengers on the liner showed symptoms of the coronavirus.Port authorities quarantined the Italian-flagged AidAmira while the six passengers were tested for coronavirus.All those tests came back negative, South Af

Go-slow at Port Hits South African Car and Commodity Exports

A go-slow by workers at a major South African port is hitting exports of cars and other commodities, the country's Public Enterprises Minister Pravin Gordhan said on Thursday.State-owned rail operator Transnet said it had suspended a number of employees at its Ngqura Container Terminal for engaging in what it said was an illegal industrial action."We are getting reports of a go-slow at some of our ports which is beginning to (have an) impact on the export of vehicles from South Africa in particular but perhaps other commodities as well…

file Image: The port of Durban, South Africa / © MichaelJung

South African Court Halts Port Strike

The South African Transport and Allied Workers Union (Satawu) said on Wednesday a court interdiction secured by the national ports authority has stopped planned strike action at ports from Thursday."Transnet National Ports Authority has interdicted the strike and the Labour Court has reserved judgment until Sept. 5, meaning we cannot go on strike tomorrow," union spokeswoman Zanele Sabela said.The strike was called after a deadlock over salary discrepancies between white and black workers.Reporting by Wendell Roelf

Mariners Set to Strike at South African Ports

South Africa's transport workers union Satawu threatened a "total shutdown" at major ports across the country from Thursday after issuing a 48-hour strike notice for mariners over a payment dispute, the union said on Tuesday.The South African Transport and Allied Workers Union (Satawu) called the strike after negotiations with management became deadlocked over salary discrepancies between black and white mariners, with what it says are white mariners drawing higher salaries than their black counterparts…

Pakistan's First Dry Bulk Terminal to Open in March

Pakistan's first dry bulk terminal will open next month and is expected to handle 3 million tonnes a year of coal imports, rising to 20 million tonnes over the next five years, the port's chief executive said on Thursday. The $285 million Port Muhammad Bin Qasim, which was built with support from the World Bank, will also be used to export cement and clinker, Sharique Siddiqui, chief executive for the Pakistan International Bulk Terminal Ltd, told Reuters at a coal conference in Cape Town. (Reporting by Wendell Roelf)