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Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Washington State Department News

Photo courtesy of DNV GL

DNV GL, Washington State Partner for Sustainable Maritime Growth

Washington State partnered with DNV GL in late 2017 to develop the “Washington Maritime Blue” strategy for the sustainable development of the state’s $38 billion maritime industry. With that strategy now complete, the State unveils how it plans to achieve the vision of being home to a world-class, thriving, and sustainable maritime industry by 2050.At an event in Seattle, Washington State Governor Jay Inslee’s Maritime Innovation Advisory Council unveiled the results of their…

© Bill Perry / Adobe Stock

Washington State, DNV GL Partner on Maritime Sector Growth

DNV GL will support Washington State as it advances its strategy for the sustainable development of the state’s $38 billion maritime industry. In December 2017, Washington State Governor Jay Inslee’s Maritime Innovation Advisory Council launched an effort called “Washington Maritime Blue” to develop a comprehensive strategy for leading the nation in “blue” ocean industry technology and practices. Classification society and advisor to the maritime industry DNV GL said it has signed on to support the Washington State Department of Commerce to help achieve this vision.

© Unkas Photo / Adobe Stock

Washington State Sued for Blocking Coal Exports to Asia

A company that planned to build a coal export terminal in the Pacific Northwest to ship western U.S. coal to Asian markets sued the state of Washington on Wednesday for blocking construction last year. Lighthouse Resources Inc filed a lawsuit in federal court against Washington Governor Jay Inslee and two state regulators for allegedly violating the U.S. Constitution's commerce clause by denying permits to allow the company to ship coal mined in Wyoming, Montana and other western states through its proposed Millennium Bulk Terminal to clients in Japan and South Korea.

© Bill Perry / Adobe Stock

Washington Maritime Economy Grows Stronger -Study

A new report from the Washington Maritime Federation shows strong health of industry, increased average salaries and tremendous opportunity to continue to grow maritime jobs. The Washington State Maritime Sector Economic Impact Study 2017 Update, released at the April 2017 Propeller Club luncheon, updates the seminal 2013 study of the same name and provides a detailed analysis of the positive economic impact of the state’s maritime industry. “This study builds upon past efforts and clearly shows the maritime industry is a cornerstone of the State’s economy…

Washington State Ferries Launches Student Art Contest

Washington state students in grades six through eight have an opportunity to have their artwork on upcoming spring ferry schedules. The Washington State Department of Transportation’s Ferries Division is now accepting submissions for its spring drawing contest until mid-January. The theme for the contest is “Ferries + Puget Sound Wildlife,” and entries must be original works of art. “We’ve printed ferry schedules for over 60 years, but before last year, we never involved our customers quite like this,” said Washington State Ferries (WSF) Service Planning Manager, Lisa Ballard.

WSF Leader to Retire

Lynne Griffith joined the Washington State Department of Transportation as assistant secretary for the ferries division in September 2014. Today, she announced that she will retire from public service at the end of January. Ferries division Chief of Staff Elizabeth Kosa, who has served alongside Griffith, will act as Washington State Ferries’ leader while the department finalizes its next steps. During Griffith’s time at the helm of the nation’s largest ferry system, missed sailings due to lack of crew dropped nearly 70 percent over the previous 26-month period.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Andrew Bellone (yellow hat), a boatswain's mate aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Fir, a 225-foot buoy tender homeported in Astoria, Ore., observes the buoy deck as the 60-foot-long Fast Sweep Boom is ra

USCG Cutter in Oregon Spill Drill

The crew of Coast Guard Cutter Fir, a 225-foot buoy tender homeported in Astoria, Oregon, participated in a Spilled Oil Response System exercise near Blake Island, Washington, Wednesday. The exercise was part of an annual response exercise and included members of the Coast Guard 13th District Response Advisor Team, Pacific Strike Team out of Novato, California, Coast Guard Auxiliary, Washington State Department of Ecology, Harley Marine Service Inc., Navy Region Northwest, Washington State Ferries, and the Marine Spill Response Corporation.

The Coast Guard and Washington State Department of Ecology responded to a report of a 65-foot pleasure craft that ran aground near Pleasant Harbor in Brinnon, Wash., Sept. 14, 2014.  It was reported that there is the potential for up to 500 gallons of diesel fuel to be aboard the vessel and an unrecoverable sheen was reported on the water.  U.S. Coast Guard photo by Coast Guard Sector Puget Sound Incident Management Division.

USCG Respond to Grounded Vessel near Pleasant Harbor, Washington

The Coast Guard and Washington State Department of Ecology are responding to a report a of 65-foot pleasure craft aground near Pleasant Harbor in Brinnon, Washington, Sunday morning. There is reportedly up to 500 gallons of diesel fuel aboard the vessel and an unrecoverable sheen was reported to be visible on the water. Responders are working with the owner to deploy containment boom around the vessel and develop plans to remove the fuel aboard. Jefferson County dispatch notified…

Seattle's Salmon Bay

Oil Spill Response in Seattle's Salmon Bay

The U.S. Coast Guard and Washington State Department of Ecology continue to oversee the cleanup and investigate the cause of an oil spill that appeared earlier this week in the Ballard Mill Marina, on Salmon Bay, along the Lake Washington Ship Canal. The Coast Guard and Ecology received reports Monday morning of oil, accompanied by strong petroleum odors in the waters. No one has come forward to take responsibility for the spill, and the Coast Guard has utilized the federal Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund to hire Global Diving and Salvage to conduct the cleanup.

Piling It On: Oil Spill Liability

While the U.S. Congress can create and pass legislation, in many circumstances there can be state laws that either augment, overlap or potentially create conflict with the federal laws. This can be especially true in the maritime world, where federal admiralty jurisdiction results in legislation that often specifically allows concurrent state law requirements. Three good examples of this can be found in the areas of abandoned and derelict vessels, vessel discharges, and liability for oil spills.

Credit: NOAA

NOAA Data Reveals Weight of Ocean and Great Lakes Economy

In 2011, the U.S. ocean and Great Lakes economy produced $282 billion in goods and services and employed 2.2 percent of the nation’s workers—that’s more than twice the percentage of workers in the U.S. agriculture industry. This fact and many others are featured in a 2011 data summary from Economics: National Ocean Watch (ENOW), a product of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Coastal Services Center. County-level facts, charts and maps highlighting the 2011 data findings are found on the “Ocean Jobs” and “Wetland Benefits” tabs of the Coastal County Snapshots tool.

Beverly A. Scott, Women of the Year

WTS International Announces 2014 Award Winners

WTS International, the association for the professional advancement of women in transportation, has selected the winners of its annual recognition awards for 2014. Each of the five awards will be presented at an awards banquet on May 15 during the 2014 WTS Annual Conference in Portland, OR. Woman of the Year – Beverly A. “Dr. Scott’s efforts to advance women in the transportation industry has inspired many and provided the industry with new workforce development opportunities. Her passion and mission are aligned with WTS International’s goals.

Capacci Named Washington Ferries Chief

State Transportation Secretary Lynn Peterson today named Capt. George A. Capacci interim assistant secretary in charge of the Ferries Division for the Washington State Department of Transportation. Capacci will lead the ferry system until a permanent assistant secretary is selected. WSDOT will conduct a nationwide search to find the best replacement for outgoing Assistant Secretary David Moseley who resigned effective April 15. Capacci joined Washington State Ferries in 2009 as regional port captain and was promoted to deputy chief of operations and construction for ferries in 2010.

David Moseley

Peterson Comments on Moseley' Resignation

Washington Secretary of Transportation Lynn Peterson issued a statement regarding the resignation of Assistant Secretary for Washington State Ferries David Moseley. Peterson's comments are as follows. After six years of service, Assistant Secretary for Washington State Ferries David Moseley has announced his plans to resign on April 15. David can be proud of his distinguished service at WSF and the many accomplishments he has made while at the helm of the ferry system. I thank him for his contributions and leadership in a position that has tremendous challenges and issues.

Steamship Mutual: US Vessel Response Plans – Contingency Plans

Washington State – Alaska – Non tank final rule & Washington State – Contingency Plan requirements. We refer to our circular no. B.613. As stated in that circular, every tank vessel and every other vessel over 300 GT is required under State law to file a contingency plan prior to entry into the waters of Washington State but that instead of filing his own plan an owner can subscribe to an umbrella oil spill contingency plan. Since publishing the abovementioned circular, Washington…

Dennis L. Bryant,  Maritime Regulatroy  Consulting, Gainsville, Fla.

LNG Fueled Vessels

Alternative to Diesel Strengthens as Barriers Continue to Fall. From the earliest days of mechanically propelled ships, fuel use has been evolving. Starting with wood, fuel changed to coal, which held sway for many years. Oil began to be used in the late nineteenth century and was clearly the dominate marine fuel of the twentieth century. Environmental shortcomings of fuel oil, particularly traditional heavy bunkers, were brought under increasing scrutiny as the twentieth century came to a close.

Mukilteo ferry terminal: Photo credit WSDOT

Mukilteo Ferry Terminal: WSDOT Release Environmental Study

The 60-year old Mukilteo ferry terminal (about 25 miles north of Seattle) is one step closer to replacement with the release of a final environmental impact statement. “We’ve reached a major milestone,” said David Moseley, assistant secretary for the Washington State Department of Transportation, Ferries Division. The Mukilteo terminal is the state’s busiest terminal, serving nearly 4 million passengers last year. But it is vulnerable to earthquake and in need of major repairs to continue safe, reliable ferry service between Mukilteo and Clinton.

The Japnese Dock: Photo credit National Park Service

U.S. Beached Tsunami Dock to be Salvaged

Swept away during the Japan tsunami of March 11, 2011, the steel, concrete, & foam dock beached at Olympic National Park, Wash. is to be removed at last. On December 18, 2012, the dock beached along the boundaries of Olympic National Park and NOAA’s Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary in Washington state. NOAA has contracted a local salvage company in Washington to complete the removal efforts by early April. The contracted company will work with the Sanctuary, Park Service, and local partners in Washington to remove the dock by helicopter after dismantling it on site.

Kenneth Vareide, Director of DNV’s maritime operations in North America

Washington State Ferries Explores LNG as Fuel

“WSF burns more than 17 million gallons of ultra-low sulfur diesel each year – and it’s our fastest growing operating expense. LNG has the potential to significantly reduce emissions and the cost of fuel,” said Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) Assistant Secretary David Moseley. LNG as a fuel is a promising, but new technology. To ensure that the safety, security and operational challenges of such a move is handled in a responsible manner, Washington State Ferries has partnered with DNV…

Ferry 'Tacoma': Photo credit WSF

WSF Soon Back to Normal Service

Washington State Ferry (WSF) service disruptions should diminish soon, as three ferries return to service from shipyard. The expected return to service of three ferry vessels over the next two weeks will help alleviate temporary service disruptions occurring now on two major ferry routes. The 202-car Tacoma, in for routine maintenance, is expected to return to service Friday evening, Dec. 14. That will be followed Monday, Dec. 17, by the return of the 90-car Sealth, now awaiting dry dock availability for weld repairs.

WSF 'Super Class' Ferry: Image credit WSF

WSF Add Number of Hands

New US Coast Guard regulations require Washington State Ferries to increase crew on Puget Sound routes. The Jumbo, Super, Issaquah and Evergreen State ferry classes – which carry many of the system’s 22 million annual riders – have new staffing requirements before they may sail on the waters of Puget Sound, in order to comply with a new directive from the United States Coast Guard. Washington State Ferries has already added two crewmembers to the Issaquah ferry and will implement the new staffing levels for the others once the USCG issues the revised certificate of inspection for each vessel.

Propulsion Machinery Damage 'Walla Walla': Photo credit WSDOT

Engine Damage Knocks Ferry Out of Service

Washington State Ferry 'Walla Walla' suffers part engine meltdown in shiprepair yard putting it out of service indefinitely. A failure in one of the drive motors on the 188-car ferry, Walla Walla, has left parts of the ferry near the engine melted and charred, and the vessel is inoperable and out of service indefinitely. The incident happened while the vessel was in for routine, regularly scheduled maintenance work on Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012; work which included inspection of electrical drive motors, overhauling the boiler and pre-checks for U.S. Coast Guard annual inspections.

Foss, State, Tribes to Build Columbia River Ferry

Partnership to create jobs; bring modern vessel to vital transportation link. Foss Maritime Company is joining with Washington state and the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation to build a state-of-the-art replacement for an aging 63-year-old ferry that's been a vital cross-Columbia River transportation link. The unique partnership between Foss and the Washington State Department of Transportation includes the Confederated Tribes whose members will participate in the vessel's final assembly work. Faber added that Foss is looking forward to working with the Confederated Tribes.

F/V Deep Sea Refloated

Global Diving & Salvage, Inc. successfully rigged and refloated the sunken 140-foot fishing vessel. The abandoned and derelict fishing vessel Deep Sea, while at anchor in Penn Cove, WA, caught fire and sank in 60 feet of water. The U.S. Coast Guard and Washington State Department of Ecology (DOE) responded and deployed boom to contain the leaking fuel oil in an effort to protect the world renowned mussel and clam fishery in the cove. Global Diving & Salvage, Inc. was contracted by the DOE to raise the 140-foot wreck and mitigate the pollution hazard from the cove.

Washington State Ferry: Photo credit CCL Wsiegmund

Washington State Ferries Contract for G4S Technology

G4S Technology LLC wins Washington State Department of Transportation, Ferries Division contract to upgrade security systems. G4S Technology LLC (formerly Adesta), a systems integrator and project management company for electronic security systems and communication networks, has been awarded a $3.8M contract from the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) Ferries Division to provide security system upgrades. They will install new Milestone XProtect® Corporate Video Management Software (VMS).

WSF Officers Save Fuel, Win Presidential Award

Washington State Department of Transportation’s Ferries Division employees devised a plan that saved US$700,000 a year. Crew members of the Washington State Department of Transportation’s Ferries Division won the President’s Transportation Award for water transportation and were recognized for their exemplary service to save fuel on the Edmonds/Kingston ferry route. Beginning in 2010, three WSF employees – Staff Chief Engineer Mark Nitchman, Captain John Tullis and retired Captain Bill Chapple – collaborated to identify a method to save fuel on one of the largest vessels in the system…