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Friday, October 18, 2019

Us Environmental Protection Agency News

Cranes at Wando Welch Terminal will be upgraded with high performing, environmentally friendly engines. (Photo/English Purcell/S.C. Ports Authority)

SC Ports, DHEC Get Grant for Crane Tech

South Carolina Ports Authority (SCPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) were awarded a $2 million grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) grant program to upgrade the engines of 12 rubber-tired gantry (RTG) cranes.The EPA awarded the grant to DHEC, in partnership with SCPA. The funding will equip the Port’s RTG cranes with hybrid battery/genset engine systems, replacing the existing hi-power diesel engines.The new engines will reduce emissions of particulate matter…

Pic: Hyundai Heavy Industries

US Fines HHI $47Mln Over Dirty Engines

US authorities announced that South Korea's top shipbuilding conglomerate Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) will pay a US$47 million fine for illegally importing and selling dirty diesel engines in violation of American environmental rules.US Justice Department and and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) said that between 2012 and 2015, the company imported nearly 2,300 diesel-powered heavy construction vehicles with engines that did not meet US emissions standards.“Hyundai put profits above the public’s health and the requirements of the law…

File Image: AdobeStock / © 14KT Gold

Tanker Owner, Operator & Officers Guilty in ECA Crimes

The owner and operator will pay a total criminal fine of $3,000,000.00.U.S. Attorney Gretchen Shappert for the District of the Virgin Islands announced that IONIAN SHIPPING & TRADING CORP., LILY SHIPPING LTD., STAMATIOS ALEKIDIS, ATHANASIOS PITTAS and REY ESPULGAR have been convicted and sentenced for various pollution, recordkeeping, and obstruction of justice crimes on the Motor Tanker (“M/T”) Ocean Princess in St. Croix, U.S.V.I. The defendants’ conduct included using fuel that exceeded the maximum allowable sulfur concentration in the U.S. Caribbean Emission Control Area (“U.S.

"Cummins plans to be a leader in electrified power and we believe this business segment will provide the innovation and focus to ensure future success" Eddie Brown, Cummins Marine. Photo: Cummins Marine

Interview: Edmonds Brown, Cummins, Inc.

The May 2019 edition of Maritime Reporter & Engineering News features a eight-page feature section on "Thought Leadership" in the marine power sector. Here we extract and present the interview with Edmonds Brown, Cummins, Inc., Commercial Marine Segment Leader.Please put in perspective and discuss the current environment and pressure to reduce emissions in the maritime industry.When I started in the marine industry, my primary focus was working to achieve certification of Cummins’ marine engines for U.S.

New Generation of Diesel Power Delivers Cargo, Cleanly to CA Ports

Latest-generation Diesel Technologies Deliver More than 80 Percent Emission Reductions in the Port Environment. California’s largest ports, the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach (LA/LB), are busier than ever AND achieving ambitious clean air goals, largely thanks to the newest generation of diesel technologies. According to the “State of the Ports” addresses delivered last week by the executive directors of the Ports of LA/LB, 9.5 million twenty-foot container units through the Port of Los Angeles and 8.1 million shipping containers through the Port of Long Beach in 2018.

AAPA: U.S. Ballast Water Legislative Victory Appears Imminent

Legislation that sets standards for incidental water discharges from vessels passed the House on Nov. 29.The Frank LoBiondo Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2018, S. 140, which includes the Vessel Incidental Discharge Act (VIDA), passed the Senate two weeks earlier and now moves to the President to be signed.The provision places the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the lead role of establishing standards for ballast water discharge, and the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) will monitor and enforce compliance.

Pic: Gard

US Delays New VGP Requirements Until March 2019

While waiting for the new Vessel General Permit (VGP) to be finalized, operators must file a Notice of Intent with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) prior to December 18, 2018 in order for vessels to continue to operate under their current VGP also after this date.According to a recent Regulatory Update published by the classification society American Bureau of Shipping (ABS), the EPA has further delayed the release its new Vessel General Permit (VGP 3.0).The proposed…

Photo: Port of Long Beach

Port Emissions Fall Even as Cargo Rises

The Port of Long Beach is continuing to outperform 2023 clean air goals for diesel particles and sulfur oxides, even while cargo volumes have jumped to record levels, according to a comprehensive study of Port-related air pollution emissions.The 2017 annual “emissions inventory” found the Port’s aggressive actions to curb pollution have cut diesel particulates by 88 percent, sulfur oxides by 97 percent and nitrogen oxides by 56 percent since 2005, the baseline year which emissions are measured against.

file Image: CREDIT EXXON

The Global 0.50% Sulfur Cap: 30 months and counting down …

Industry frets about the coming deadline. Shipping desperately wants to be ready, but will global shore-based infrastructure and refining capacity match the demand that is sure to come? And … are regulators listening to industry’s concerns?In early June, the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) held a public workshop in Washington to help the agencies prepare for the January 1, 2020 deadline for worldwide implementation of very low sulfur marine…

REGULATORY WATCH: The Global 0.50% Sulfur Cap: 30 months and counting down …

Industry frets about the coming deadline. Shipping desperately wants to be ready, but will global shore-based infrastructure and refining capacity match the demand that is sure to come? And … are regulators listening to industry’s concerns? In early June, the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) held a public workshop in Washington to help the agencies prepare for the January 1, 2020 deadline for worldwide implementation of very low sulfur marine fuel that meets the new 0.50% sulfur cap as set forth by the International Maritime Organization (IMO).

Photo: Port of Los Angeles

Global Ports Collaborate on Clean Air Solutions

Participants from ports around the Pacific Rim, Asia, the Americas, and Europe gathered in Los Angeles this week to discuss innovations and best practices for reducing emissions from port-related operations. The two-day Pacific Ports Clean Air Collaborative conference was hosted by the Port of Los Angeles in collaboration with the Commission for Environmental Cooperation and the US-China Green Ports and Vessels Initiative. The conference included representatives from shipping and cruise lines, terminal operators, regulatory agencies, trucking and logistic companies, and universities.

(Credit: GLDD)

US Dredging: An Advocate for Ports, Waterways & Coastal Protection

U.S. dredging companies are unlocking the potential of U.S. Ports. These companies build their equipment in U.S. shipyards, are owned by U.S. companies and staff their ships and projects with hardworking Americans. U.S.-based Dredgers build to suit the needs of the United States. We all know that it takes a significant amount of time to complete an environmental analysis before a dredging project can commence. This usually means that an environmental impact statement (EIS) under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) must be undertaken.

Photo: Port of Long Beach

POLB Receives EPA Grant to Cut Pollution

The Port of Long Beach has been awarded $2.4 million from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to help Stevedoring Services of America (SSA), Foss Maritime and Curtin Maritime replace equipment with zero-emission or cleanest-available equipment. The Diesel Emission Reduction Act money will enable SSA to retrofit three rubber-tired gantry cranes to all-electric operations, entirely reducing related emissions and diesel fuel consumption. The funds will also assist in retrofitting four tugboats operated by Foss and Curtin with the newest and cleanest engines available.

(Photo: Port of Long Beach)

Long Beach Secures $2.4 Mln for Cleaner Cranes, Tugs

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has awarded $2.4 million to the Port of Long Beach to help replace several existing cranes and tugboats with new zero-emission or cleanest-available equipment. The Diesel Emission Reduction Act (DERA) money will enable Stevedoring Services of America (SSA) to retrofit three rubber-tired gantry cranes to all-electric operations, entirely reducing related emissions and diesel fuel consumption. The funds will also assist in retrofitting four tugboats operated by Foss Maritime and Curtin Maritime with the newest and cleanest engines available.

EPA Awards Nearly $2 Mln for Clean Repowers

Three New England projects have been awarded nearly two million dollars under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) competitive national grant competition to reduce diesel emissions. The grants, totaling $1,975,000, were made under the Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA). The funding will assist the Connecticut Maritime Foundation, the Massachusetts Port Authority and the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority in marine vessel repowering and vehicle replacement projects. Diesel engines contribute significantly to air pollution, especially in urban areas.

Debra DiCianna (Photo: Choice Ballast Solutions)

DiCianna Joins Choice Ballast Solutions

Choice Ballast Solutions (Choice), a provider of ballast water treatment planning, installation and compliance, has hired Debra DiCianna as Senior Compliance Engineer. DiCianna’s career in the maritime industry spans over 25 years with extensive experience in the compliance and operational issues of shipowners and the design/performance of ballast water management systems. In her role at Choice, DiCianna will be responsible for assisting clients, both shipowners and ballast water treatment manufacturers, in all matters concerning BWMS planning, installation and compliance.

EPA Proposes Ban on Sewage Dumping in St. Lawrence River

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has determined that a “no discharge zone” can be established for the New York State portion of the St. Lawrence River. The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation petitioned the EPA to prohibit boats from discharging sewage into the river by establishing a “no discharge zone” for the area. The EPA has reviewed the state petition and found that there are adequate facilities around the St. Lawrence for boats to pump out their sewage, rather than dumping it in the water.

Sutherland Continues Expansion in the Northeast

Sutherland Asbill & Brennan LLP has announced that Paul C. Freeman has joined the firm’s Energy, Environmental and Commodities Practice Group as counsel in the New York office. Prior to joining Sutherland, Freeman maintained a diverse practice as the principal of Freeman Law Group, LLC. His previous experience included serving as counsel at Dewey & LeBoeuf and working in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of General Counsel in Washington DC. Freeman brings more than 17 years of diverse experience advising clients in the energy…

Shipping Company Sentenced for Dumping Oil

Dauelsberg GmbH & Co. KG, a German company, was sentenced in U.S. federal court June 3 to pay a total of $750,000 in fines and community service payments for violating the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships by intentionally discharging 1,780 gallons of oily water into the sea off the coast of Alaska and then presenting false records to the U.S. Coast Guard. Herm. Dauelsberg was also ordered to implement a comprehensive Environmental Compliance Plan and was placed on probation for three years. During the term of probation, Herm.

ACO Marine Managing Director Mark Beavis “The FOE report paints a contrasting picture to the environmentally conscientious one offered by the cruise lines themselves”

40% Cruise Ships Use Outdated Sewage Treatment Plants

ACO Marine has welcomed the findings reported in the Friends of the Earth 2016 Cruise Ship Report Card, the annual survey of cruise shipping’s impact on the environment, which highlights a growing need for the sector to update its sewage treatment technology. The annual FOE survey, published in June, documented the environmental footprint of 17 cruise lines and 171 cruise ships, finding that a significant proportion of vessels continue to operate out-dated sewage treatment plant.

Changing Box Landscape Demands That Yard Tools Keep Pace

he need for increased operating efficiencies for container terminals collides with the demands of a Tier 4 regulatory climate. Fortunately, you can achieve the former goal while satisfying your thirst for latter. Ports and container terminal operators everywhere are faced with many challenges. A shifting liner alliance landscape has reshuffled the intermodal deck, and some ports are scrambling to dredge and finish the infrastructure necessary to handle the increased TEU throughput.

Pollution Study Reveals impacts of terminal congestion on last year’s air quality

2015 Congestion Affected Long Beach Port's Air Quality

Pollution around the Port of Long Beach has been dramatically cut over the last decade, however, according to the latest study, lingering effects from ships at anchor in early 2015 impacted air quality last year. The 2015 annual inventory of port-related air emissions, conducted by an independent consultant, found the Port’s aggressive actions to curtail pollution have decreased diesel particulate matter by 84 percent since 2005, a slight decrease from the 85 percent reduction reported in 2014. Sulfur oxides were 97 percent lower, the same level reported in 2014.

Port of Baltimore Secures EPA Clean Diesel Grant

The U.S Environmental Protection Agency today announced a $978,302 Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) grant to the Maryland Environmental Services that will be used to upgrade diesel equipment that is used to move cargo at the Port of Baltimore. The project will reduce harmful pollutants impacting near-port communities while improving fuel efficiency. “This funding builds upon the Port of Baltimore’s ongoing efforts to reduce emissions, increase energy efficiency, and promote sustainability,” said EPA’s Mid-Atlantic Regional Administrator Shawn M. Garvin.

Photo: Port of Oakland

The Port of Oakland is Curbing Emissions

Diesel emissions from trucks and ships serving the Port of Oakland declined 98 percent and 75 percent respectively between 2005 and 2015, as found by an emissions inventory released by the port. According to the port, an analysis of the 2015 Emissions Inventory shows a 76 percent decrease in total diesel emissions at the Oakland Seaport. “This is a significant achievement,” said Richard Sinkoff, Director of Environmental Programs and Planning at the Port. The port’s study found that truck Diesel Particulate Matter (DPM) emissions have decreased from 16 tons in 2005 to 0.4 tons in 2015…

Photo Crowley

Crowley Joins U.S. EPA SmartWay

Continuing its longtime commitment to eco-friendly practices, Crowley’s Puerto Rico liner services group has joined the SmartWay Transport Partnership, an innovative collaboration between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and industry that provides a framework to assess the environmental and energy efficiency of moving goods through the supply chain. As a SmartWay Partner, Crowley can benchmark environmental performance of its barges and tugs providing service to Puerto Rico by tracking emissions on a ton-mile basis…

© trekandphoto / Adobe Stock

EPA Grant for Port of LA

The Port of Los Angeles has received an $800,000 grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to deploy green commercial equipment for moving cargo. The award will pay between 25 to 40 percent of the cost to replace and upgrade 18 pieces of yard equipment at two Los Angeles container terminals, with the full complement due to be in service by fall 2018. Two terminal operators, APM Terminals Pacific Ltd. and TraPac LLC, are funding the lion’s share of the $3 million project.