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Sunday, July 12, 2020

University College London News

Photo by Kinsey on Unsplash

UK Startup to Apply Aviation Fuel Tracker for Shipping

A U.K. startup tracking fuel-use performance in aviation will look to apply its product in the maritime sector in an effort to improve the environmental record of the shipping industry.One of 10 winners of MarRI-UK funding, Signol and its academic partners at University College London’s Energy Institute have been awarded a total of £130,000 ($162,200) for STEAM (Sustainability Through Efficient Actions in Maritime), a project looking to directly change the behavior of ships’ crews…

David Cox (Photo: MatthewsDaniel)

MatthewsDaniel Names Cox as CEO

David Cox has been appointed CEO of MatthewsDaniel, effective April 8. He reports to Matthieu de Tugny, President of Bureau Veritas Marine & Offshore. Previously Chief Operating Officer, Cox succeeds Kevin Jarman who has been CEO of MatthewsDaniel for 30 years. Jarman having led the growth and expansion of the business through those three decades will now act as a Special Advisor.Cox started his career as a Subsea Engineer in 2001 with BBP Technical Services and began his career as a Loss Adjuster when he joined MatthewsDaniel in 2006.

Image by Poseidon Principles

Poseidon Readies $140Bn Shipping Loan

With the signing by the France-based international lender to global shipping BNP Paribas and the Swiss multinational investment bank Credit Suisse, Signatories of the Poseidon Principles represent around $140 billion in loans to international shipping – about 30% of the total global ship finance portfolio.Poseidon Principles is a global framework for responsible ship finance which helps incentivize shipping’s decarbonization.They establish a common framework to quantitatively…

© Martin Lueke / Adobe Stock

IMO's 2050 Decarbonization Target Has $1 Trillion Pricetag

At least $1 trillion of investment in new fuel technology is needed to enable the shipping industry to meet U.N. targets for cuts in carbon emissions by 2050, a study published on Monday showed.The global shipping fleet, which accounts for 2.2% of the world's CO2 emissions, is under pressure to reduce those emissions and other pollution. About 90% of world trade is transported by sea.U.N. shipping agency, the International Maritime Organization (IMO), aims to reduce the industry's greenhouse gas emissions by 50% from 2008 levels by 2050…

Pic: University College London Photo credit: Alexander Mils on Pexels

Tracking Ship Emissions from Space

A new ground-breaking study by University College London (UCL) Energy Institute, Imperial College and the University of Oxford shows how satellite tracking could be used to monitor compliance with the upcoming IMO 0.5% sulfur emission regulations and Emission Control Areas (ECA).Research conducted by their own researchers, UCL Energy and the University of Oxford and published today in Geophysical Research Letters, has unveiled discoveries that appear important on many levels for…

© xy / Adobe Stock

Decarbonization: 34 Maritime CEOs Call for Action

A who’s who list of maritime industry executives have signed on to voice their support for a zero-carbon future in shipping.The not-for-profit foundation the Global Maritime Forum brought together a group of 34 CEOs and industry leaders from across the global maritime sector to sign a call for action and lead the industry in a transition toward decarbonization.To achieve this, these leaders believe the maritime industry needs to accelerate both technological and business model innovation…

The Impact of Decarbonization on Shipping Finance

“Many global financial institutions have committed to bringing their portfolios in line with the transition to a low-carbon economy. At a Global Maritime Forum roundtable in London yesterday, the Carbon Pricing Leadership Coalition and global NGO Carbon War Room, worked with shipping leads from major global financial institutions to explore the challenges of decarbonisation for ship financing. With the launch of the report Preparing shipping banks for climate change: How can internal carbon pricing help ship-financing banks in risk management?…

(Image: Rolls-Royce)

The Human Aspect of the Autonomous Ship

Arguably a long way off, the autonomous ship is likely coming. What that means for labor, the stakeholders that prepare mariners to go to sea and the firms that will operate these futuristic vessels is another thing altogether. According to Dr. Jeremy Rifkin, a Wharton professor who has advised the European Union on Sustainability, among other things, we are in the midst of a ‘Third Industrial Revolution.’ It is here where information technology and new energy sources are upending business models that have thrived since the second iteration – the era of electricity…

Summer interns Rez Nuru (left) and Alex Rubin (right) working in Portsmouth Naval Base for BAE Systems. (Photo: BAE Systems)

BAE Systems Welcomes Record Number of Paid Interns

More than 140 university students from across the country are being given a unique insight into working life at BAE Systems, as part of the company’s 12-week summer internship program. At Portsmouth Naval Base and Cowes on the Isle of Wight, 11 interns are currently working across a number of disciplines from HR and finance, through to engineering and supply chain. Now in its third year, this growing program gives students the opportunity to learn from employees who are experts in their fields and gain insights that can only come from real world experience.

Powering Ahead with Wind Assist Technologies

Wind assist technologies have come of age for shipping companies. A panel discussion entitled “Accelerating Adoption of Double Digit Fuel Saving Technologies,” at the recent Danish Maritime Days in early October drove this point home nicely. Describing the meeting in Copenhagen, Dr. Tristan Smith, from University College London’s (UCL) Energy Institute, told Maritime Professional last month that “… the event involved a coming together of ship owners and the leading companies developing…

Fay Catsiba

Liberian Registry Appoints Catsiba Manager in Dubai

Fay Catsiba has joined the Liberian International Ship & Corporate Registry (LISCR) as Business Development Manager based in Dubai, U.A.E. Greece-born Fay, who holds a Master of Law from University College London, began her career in shipping 22 years ago as a lecturer in Maritime Law, Transport Law and International Trade Law at the Southampton Institute of Maritime Studies, England. Thereafter, she has held a number of senior positions as claims and insurance manager as well as legal and general counsel for several leading shipping companies in Greece, Switzerland and the Philippines.

Ship propulsion: Image courtesy of LR/UCL

Ship Fuel of Choice to Remain Heavy Oil in 2030: New Analysis

A new study by Lloyds Register and University College, London, discusses the prospects of marine fuels in 'Global Marine Fuel Trends 2030', giving insights into future fuel demand for the containership, bulk carrier/general cargo and tanker sectors (which represent about 70% of the global shipping industry's fuel demands). Fuel oil remains the main fuel for deep sea shipping; LNG develops a deep sea bunker market share of 11%; low sulphur heavy fuel oil and hydrogen emerge as alternatives in certain scenarios.

John Newell (Photo courtesy INEC)

Innovative Solutions to Global Trends at INEC 2014

The newly launched program for the 12th International Naval Engineering Conference and Exhibition – INEC 2014, being held at the Marine Establishment Amsterdam in the Netherlands (May 20-22, 2014) features an incomparable line-up drawn from over a dozen countries speaking to the theme ‘Innovative solutions to global trends’. The program includes keynote addresses by Vice Admirals of both the Royal Netherlands Navy and the Royal Navy, and, thanks to the support of the Royal Netherlands Navy, a networking and industrial visit program with the innovative HNLMS Tromp at its heart.

'Shipping & Climate' Change: Upcoming IMarEST Lecture

‘Shipping and Climate Change: how Science can aid an industry that emits more CO2 than the UK’ is second in the ‘Sea Changes Lecture Series’. The series, organised by the Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (IMarEST) in association with University College London (UCL), aims to examine the relationship between marine science, technology and engineering. ‘Shipping and Climate Change: how Science can aid an industry that emits more CO2 than the UK’, will take place in the Sir Ambrose Fleming Lecture Theatre, UCL, London WC1E 7JE on Monday 18 March, 2013.

Arctic Ocean Free of Ice in Summer Perhaps in a Few Years

Sea ice in the Arctic is disappearing at a far greater rate than previously expected according to latest dedicated satellite data. Preliminary results from the European Space Agency's CryoSat-2 probe indicate that 900 cubic kilometres of summer sea ice has disappeared from the Arctic ocean over the past year. This rate of loss is 50% higher than most scenarios outlined by polar scientists and suggests that global warming, triggered by rising greenhouse gas emissions, is beginning to have a major impact on the region.

Four New Technical Advisers at IMCA

With the arrival of four new Technical Advisers, the International Marine Contractors Association (IMCA) is well set to carry out its work programme on behalf of its 850+ member companies in over 60 countries. The four new members of the team take on the roles of Technical Adviser – Competence and Training; Technical Adviser – Marine; and two are Technical Advisers – Diving. They join the existing technical team headed by IMCA’s Technical Director, Jane Bugler and her team of four other Technical Advisers and Certification Schemes Co-ordinator, and Certification Schemes Assistant.

Keel Marine Wind Farm Hull.

Keel Marine Selects Paramarine Ship Design Software

Keel Marine selects Paramarine as their ship design software platform. Paramarine advanced marine design software, developed by QinetiQ GRC, has been selected by Keel Marine to replace their in-house developed ship design software. For nearly fifty years Keel Marine, who are based in the UK, has delivered naval architecture and marine engineering services globally to an impressive range of commercial and government entities. Keel Marine has established a reputation for excellence and high standards…

ONR Continues ACCeSS Research Funding

The Atlantic Center for the Innovative Design and Control of Small Ships (ACCeSS) at Stevens Institute of Technology announced major funding for the next five years worth $4.5m by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) as part of its National Naval Responsibility – Naval Engineering (NNR-NE) program. ACCeSS is a consortium of both University and Industry partners including: the U.S. Naval Academy, Naval Post Graduate School, University College London; Florida Atlantic University; Webb Institute; Lockheed Martin; AMSEC LLC (Northrop-Grumman); VT Shipbuilding and Band-Lavis Associates.