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Sunday, March 29, 2020

Revenue Cutter Service News

Coast Guard newest National Security Cutter makes a Baltimore port call - open for public tours

Coast Guard's Cutter James Makes First Port Call

Fresh from commissioning festivities in Boston, Coast Guard’s newest National Security Cutter, James, made its first port call to Baltimore, Tuesday. Wednesday, Aug. 19 from 8 to 10 a.m.; 1 to 4 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 20 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. (GPS unit: 920 S Broadway, Baltimore, Md. Cutter James was recently commissioned for operational service at Boston Aug. 8 and is making way to its inaugural homeport in Charleston scheduled to arrive Aug. 28. Its namesake links the next generation of men and women serving aboard to the renowned lifesavers of the past, most notably of Capt.

The Commissioning ceremony. James is the fifth of eight planned National Security Cutters and the second to be homeported on the East Coast

USCG Commissions National Security Cutter in Boston

The Coast Guard commissioned its newest National Security Cutter, the 418-foot Coast Guard Cutter James, Saturday during a ceremony at Coast Guard Base Boston. "Joshua James began his life-saving career at 15 and saved more than 600 lives," said Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Paul Zukunft. During the ceremony, Zukunft, Charlene James Benoit, of Milford, Connecticut, the ship's sponsor and great-great niece of the ship's namesake, and James' commanding officer, Capt. Andrew J. Tiongson…

Coast Guard Cutter Hamilton

USCG Welcomes Cutter Hamilton to Fleet

Coast Guard Cutter Hamilton, the first national security cutter homeported on the East Coast, entered into active service today at Union Pier Terminal in downtown Charleston. The commissioning ceremony for the Coast Guard’s largest and newest 418-foot cutter was presided by Vice Adm. William “Dean” Lee, Coast Guard Atlantic Area commander. Commandant of the Coast Guard, Adm. Paul F. Zukunft, delivered the keynote address. “Together with my shipmates, we’re beginning the most important milestones in the life of a cutter,” said Capt.

Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Bob Papp with then-mayor of Barrow Edward Itta.

Interview: Admiral Papp - Changing the Discussion

U.S. Coast Guard Commandant Robert Papp takes (another) round turn. Almost three years since assuming command of the United States Coast Guard, Admiral Robert Papp still insists that his service will not be focusing on additional changes – not under his command. The reshuffling of organizational deckchairs, moves towards one side of the mission to another or any other changes to how the Coast Guard operates, are a thing of the past. But, are they really? An April visit with the Commandant…

Captain Brian A. McAllister

Historical Society to Salute Maritime Leaders

The National Maritime Historical Society will host its 2012 Annual Awards Dinner on Wednesday, 10 October 2012 at the New York Yacht Club in New York City. The NMHS Distinguished Service Award, for outstanding contributions in the maritime field, will be presented to Admiral Sir Jonathon Band GCB DL, Captain Brian A. McAllister, and Captain Don Walsh, USN (Ret.), PhD. The David A. O’Neil Sheet Anchor Award, recognizing the contributions of those who further the work of the Society, will be given to Thomas F. Daly.

Photo credit USS Slater.org

USCG to Celebrate 222nd Anniversary Aboard Historic Destroyer

The United States Coast Guard, one of the country's five armed services,is a unique agency of the federal government. The service was founded on August 4, 1790 when the first Congress authorized the construction of ten vessels to enforce tariff and trade laws and prevent smuggling. Known variously as the Revenue Marine and the Revenue Cutter Service, the Coast Guard expanded in size and responsibilities as the nation grew. It is appropriate to celebrate the Coast Guard’s Birthday…

Arctic Shield 2012: USCG Mounts Historic Arctic Effort

While it seems that half the world is monitoring the oil and gas exploration activities of Royal Dutch Shell (Shell Oil) on the United States outer continental shelf (OCS) in waters of the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas off the north coast of Alaska, another historic event is occurring in those same waters: Arctic Shield 2012. The US Coast Guard is assembling its largest ever effort in the Arctic during the period July through October 2012. The Coast Guard has been gradually expanding its presence in the Arctic over the past four years.

The Nanuq was outfitted with oil-spill-response capabilities well before the 2010 Macondo spill in the Gulf, he noted. The Aiviq is designed to work in tandem with the Nanuq. (Photo Courtesy Shell)

Arctic Oil Exploration: Shell Awaits New Giant Icebreaker

The M/V Aiviq icebreaker, contracted by Shell Oil to support drilling in Alaska’s Chukchi Sea, is scheduled to be completed by Louisiana-based Edison Chouest Offshore in early 2012. The vessel, ordered in July 2009, is on track for April 1, 2012, delivery in Galliano, La., and will then head north, according to Shell Oil spokesman Curtis Smith. The $200m Aiviq is the largest vessel ever built by Chouest, and will be among the most advanced and powerful, non-military icebreakers on the waters.

Domestic Maritime Industry Salute USCG

U.S.-flag vessel operators and allied industries engaged in domestic waterborne commerce today recognized the vital role the U.S. Coast Guard plays in keeping America’s waters safe and secure. The salute comes on the 221st anniversary of the legislation that established the Revenue Cutter Service, the forerunner of today’s U.S. Coast Guard. “The U.S. Coast Guard is the most underappreciated federal agency,” said James Henry, President of the Transportation Institute, and Chairman of the Board of American Maritime Partnership.

This Day in Coast Guard History – May 12

1906-In part due to the lobbying efforts of the Maritime Association of the Port of New York, Congress authorized the construction of a cutter "equipped to cruise for and destroy derelicts and obstructions to navigation" for the Revenue Cutter Service. The Service contracted with the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company to build this "derelict destroyer," which was christened USRC Seneca. She was commissioned in 1908. 1938- Lieutenant C. B. Olsen became the first Coast Guardsman to be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.

This Day in Coast Guard History – May 11

1898-USRC Hudson towed the crippled USS Winslow from certain destruction under the Spanish forts at Cardenas, Cuba during the Spanish-American War. Congress later conferred a Gold Medal of Honor on her commanding officer, Revenue First Lieutenant F. H. Newcomb. His officers and crew were awarded Silver and Bronze Medals. 1908-The Revenue Cutter Service was authorized to enforce Alaska game laws. 1945-On the morning of 11 May 1945, four days after Nazi Germany surrendered unconditionally to the Allies…

This Day in Coast Guard History – May 3

1882-The Treasury Department reported that the crew of the cutter Oliver Wolcott deserted their ship. No reason was given for this mass desertion. 1885-The Navy transferred the USS Bear to the Revenue Cutter Service. The Bear became one of the most famous cutters to sail under the Revenue Cutter & Coast Guard ensigns. 1944- An acoustic torpedo fired by the U-371 hit and destroyed the stern of the Coast Guard-manned destroyer escort USS Menges while she was escorting a convoy in the Mediterranean, killing thirty-one of her crew.

This Day in Coast Guard History – April 30

1789-  President George Washington was inaugurated in New York City as the nation's first President. His inauguration marked the beginning of U.S. Constitutional government. 1798-Congress established the Department of the Navy on this date in 1798. Nevertheless, the United States Navy traces its origins to the Continental Navy, which the Continental Congress established on 13 October 1775 by authorizing the procurement, fitting out, manning, and dispatch of two armed vessels to cruise in search of munitions ships supplying the British Army in America.

This Day in Coast Guard History – April 28

1908- Secretary of Commerce and Labor was authorized to patrol regattas and transfer that authority to another Department if need be. Thus the Revenue Cutter Service became the primary federal agency that patrolled regattas. 1918- CGC Seneca saved 81 survivors from the torpedoed British naval sloop Cowslip while on convoy route to Gibraltar. Cowslip was attacked by three German U-boats. 1993-Coast Guard PACAREA LEDETs, operating from the USS Valley Forge and USS Cleveland, boarded the St. Vincent-flagged 225-foot freighter Sea Chariot about 300 miles southwest of Panama.

This Day in Coast Guard History – April 26

1898- During the Spanish-American War, Morrill, Hudson, and Hamilton, formerly Revenue Cutters and recently armed for service in the so-called "Mosquito Fleet," passed through Hampton Roads and after asking formal permission of the Commodore, proceeded to Key West. From that point they joint the Navy ship's of the Cuban blockading fleet. 1899-On April 26, the Revenue Cutter Service signed a lease with two prominent Baltimore landowners for 36 acres of farmland surrounding Arundel Cove, Maryland.

This Day in Coast Guard History – April 14

1876- An Act of Congress (19 Stat. 1912- At around 11:40 p.m. on the night of 14 April, RMS Titanic collided with an iceberg off Newfoundland while sailing on her maiden voyage from Southampton to New York. She sank a little over two hours later. There were 1,517 lost including 103 women and 53 children out of total passenger and crew of 2,207. Subsequently, certification and life saving devices were improved and an International Ice Patrol was created to patrol the sea lanes off Newfoundland and Greenland during the winter months.

This Day in Coast Guard History – April 12

1808- Subsistence for Army officers fixed at 20 cents per ration, later that year applied to all officers of the revenue cutters. 1843- Captain Alexander V. Fraser, Revenue Cutter Service, appointed Chief of newly-created Revenue Marine Bureau of Treasury (he was, in effect, the service's first "Commandant"). 1861-The Revenue cutter Harriet Lane fired the first shot from a naval vessel in the Civil War. The cutter fired across the bow of the merchant vessel Nashville when the latter attempted to enter Charleston Harbor without displaying the national flag. 1900- An Act of Congress (31 Stat.

This Day in Coast Guard History – April 6

1894- President authorized the Revenue Cutter Service to enforce the Paris Award, which was concerned with the preservation of fur seals in Alaska. 1917- The United States declared war on Germany and joined the Allied Powers in World War I. The Coast Guard, which at that time consisted of 15 cruising cutters, 200 commissioned officers, and 5,000 warrant officers and enlisted men, became part of the U. S. Navy by Executive Order. The cutters immediately reported to their assigned naval districts for duty. Cutters provided armed parties to seize German ships that had been interned in U.S. ports.

Coast Guard SONS 2010 National Exercise

The U.S. Coast Guard and 50 other federal, state and private organizations will conduct the triennial Spill of National Significance Exercise or SONS 2010 from March 22-25 in the northeast region of the U.S. SONS 2010 is a full-scale exercise designed to test response to a Spill of National Significance. A SONS is a spill that due to its severity, size, location, complexity or impact requires extraordinary coordination of federal, state, local, and responsible party resources to contain and clean up.

This Day in Coast Guard History – March 17

1863- The cutter Agassiz defended the Union-held Fort Anderson at New Bern, North Carolina, from a Confederate attack. 1902- All but one of the members of the crew of the Monomoy (Massachusetts) Life-Saving Station perished during the attempted rescue of the crew of the wrecked coal barge Wadena during a terrible winter gale. The dead included the keeper of the station, Marshall N. Eldridge, and six of his surfmen. Eldridge told his crew before they departed on the rescue that: "We must go, there is a distress flag in the rigging."  The crew of five from the barge also perished.

This Day in Coast Guard History – March 3

1819-  Congress authorized the revenue cutters to protect merchant vessels of United States against piracy and to seize vessels engaged in slave trade. The cutters Louisiana and Alabama were built shortly thereafter to assist in the government's efforts against piracy. 1837- An Act of Congress (5 Stat. L., 181, 185) laid down certain restrictions, by providing that the construction of the large number of new lighthouses, lightships, etc., for which this law was appropriating the necessary funds, would not be begun until examined by Board of Navy Commissioners.

This Day in Coast Guard History – Feb. 23

1822- Congress authorized the Revenue Cutter Service to protect the natural environment by preventing "scoundrels" from cutting live oak, needed for cutters and Navy vessels, on Florida public lands. 1837-Congress called for an inspection of the coast from Chesapeake Bay to the Sabine River "with regard to the location of additional light-houses, beacons, and buoys."  Captain Napoleon L. Coste, commanding the Revenue cutter Campbell, was dispatched. He reported that the first addition to aids to navigation on this entire coast should be at Egmont Key, Tampa Bay.

This Day in Coast Guard History – Feb. 4

1859- U.S. signs "Treaty of Friendship, Commerce and Navigation" with Paraguay at Asuncion after the revenue cutter Harriet Lane, as part of a US Navy expedition, forced the opening of the Paraguay and Parana Rivers. 1863-  Commissioned officers of the Revenue Cutter Service were to be appointed by the President by and with advice and consent of the Senate. This act contained the first statutory use of term "Revenue Cutter Service."  Previous laws referred only to "revenue cutters".

This Day in Coast Guard History – Jan. 28

1885-Keeper Marcus Hanna of the Cape Elizabeth Light Station saved two men from the wrecked schooner Australia. For this rescue Hanna was awarded the Gold Lifesaving Medal. He was also awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions at Port Hudson in 1863. He is the only person to have ever received both awards. 1915- President Woodrow Wilson signed into law the "Act to Create the Coast Guard," an act passed by Congress on 20 January 1915 that combined the Life-Saving Service and Revenue Cutter Service to form the Coast Guard (38 Stat. L., 800).

This Day in Coast Guard History – Jan. 25

1799- Having existed essentially nameless for 8-1/2 years, Alexander Hamilton's "system of cutters" was referred to in legislation as "Revenue Cutters."  Some decades later, the name evolved to Revenue Cutter Service and Revenue Marine. 1940- The ocean station program was formally established on 25 January 1940 under orders from President Franklin Roosevelt. The Coast Guard, in cooperation with the U. S. Weather Service, were given responsibility for its establishment and operation.

This Day in Coast Guard History - Jan. 15

1836- A General Order from the Secretary of the Treasury prescribed that "Blue cloth be substituted for the uniform dress of the officers of the Revenue Cutter Service, instead of grey. . ." thereby ending a controversy that ad brewed for years regarding the uniforms of the Service. 1947- The first helicopter flight to the base "Little America" in Antarctica took place. The pilot was LT James A. Cornish, USCG and he carried Chief Photographer's Mate Everett Mashburn as his observer. They flew from the CGC Northwind.