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Monday, July 22, 2019

Office Of Naval Research News

Photo credit: Nicklas Gustafsson

OPTECH South 2017: Littoral Challenges in Colombia

Naval experts from around the world are meeting in Cartagena, Colombia, for the Operations and Technology (OPTECH) South 2017 conference. The event is being conducted by the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School’s (NPS) Littoral Operations Center (LOC), supported by the Office of Naval Research-Global and the Colombian Naval Science and Technology Office and Swedish defense company Saab. The littoral is the complex “near shore” environment where hydrography, geography, commerce, fishing…

An unmanned rigid-hull inflatable boat operates autonomously during an Office of Naval Research (ONR)-sponsored demonstration of swarmboat technology held at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story. During the demonstration four boats, using an ONR-sponsored system called CARACaS (Control Architecture for Robotic Agent Command Sensing), operated autonomously during various scenarios designed to identify, trail or track a target of interest. (U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams)

Video: US Navy Tests Autonomous Swarmboats

The U.S. Navy is examining new possibilities for autonomy in future naval missions, putting autonomous unmanned vessels to the test in a recent demonstration in the lower Chesapeake Bay. Officials from the Office of Naval Research (ONR), together with partners from industry, academia and other government organizations, leveraged a combination of high-tech software, radar and other sensors to get a “swarm” of rigid hull inflatable boats (RHIBs) and other small vessels – “swarmboats” – to collectively perform autonomous patrol missions with only remote human supervision.

ENSTA Bretagne Team  Photo CMRE

ENSTA Bretagne wins SAUC-Europe ‘16 at CMRE

Team ENSTA Bretagne from France won the 11th edition SAUC-E competition, the Student Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Challenge - Europe. The 2nd prize went to the Tom Kyle team, from the University of Applied Sciences of Kiel (Germany). The UNIFI team with the robot Marta from the University of Florence was awarded the 3rd prize. The other prizes were awarded to: the AUGA team, from the University of Vigo with ACSM, that won the “Collaborator Award”; the ROBOTUIC team, from International University of Canarias…

Voyage data recorder next to El Faro mast on ocean floor (Photo: NTSB)

El Faro’s Voyage Data Recorder Located

The voyage data recorder (VDR) belonging to sunken cargo ship El Faro was found early Tuesday morning in 15,000 feet of water, about 41 miles northeast of Acklins and Crooked Islands, Bahamas, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) announced. A specialist team comprised of investigators and scientists from the NTSB, the U.S. Coast Guard, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Tote Services, the owner and operator of El Faro, located the VDR using remotely operated undersea search equipment. Video footage showing El Faro's VDR is available here. At about 1 a.m.

Christopher Wiernicki (Photo: ABS)

ABS Endows Professor at University of Michigan

A newly funded professorship in the Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Department underscores ABS’ commitment to education. ABS has endowed the American Bureau of Shipping Professor of Marine and Offshore Design and Performance position at the University of Michigan, naming Dr. Steven Ceccio, Chair of the Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Department, to the role. Speaking at the University of Michigan on April 14, 2016, ABS Chairman, President and CEO Christopher J. Wiernicki talked about ABS’ longstanding commitment to education.

Photo: MIT

Rogue Wave Ahead

Sailing history is rife with tales of monster-sized rogue waves — huge, towering walls of water that seemingly rise up from nothing to dwarf, then deluge, vessel and crew. Rogue waves can measure eight times higher than the surrounding seas and can strike in otherwise calm waters, with virtually no warning. Now a prediction tool developed by MIT engineers may give sailors a 2-3 minute warning of an incoming rogue wave, providing them with enough time to shut down essential operations on a ship or offshore platform.

The concept for the Anti-Submarine Warfare Continuous Trail Unmanned Vessel, an unmanned seafaring ship that would hunt quiet diesel submarines. Courtesy of DARPA

DARPA All Set To Launch Submarine Hunting Drone

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) will launch in April a sleek, 132-foot warship from Portland, OR, testing its abilities over a succeeding period of 18 months. The ship is entirely autonomous, fully operational without an onboard crew. The Anti-Submarine Warfare Continuous Trail Unmanned Vessel, or ACTUV, is scheduled to be launched April 17 from the Vigor Shipyards in Oregon. The ACTUV will continue sea-trials for 18 months following its maiden voyage, where it will be tested for its long-range tracking and self-driving functions.

Rear Adm. Mat Winter, chief of naval research, discusses game-changing technology for the warfighter during a keynote address at the 28th Annual Surface Navy Association National Symposium. The Department of the Navy's Office of Naval Research provides the science and technology necessary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps' technological advantage. (U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams)

Chief of Naval Research Helps Steer New Tech for the Fleet

When discussing the Navy’s top science and technology (S&T) priorities with military, government and industry leaders, Chief of Naval Research Rear Adm. Mat Winter reflected on his college days at the University of Notre Dame. “When I graduated from Notre Dame 30 years ago, many of the things that the Navy had in the ‘petri dish’ back then, so to speak, are being used today throughout the fleet,” said Winter. On Jan. 13, Winter gave the keynote address at the Surface Navy Association’s 28th Annual Symposium, held in Crystal City, Virginia.

Littoral OP Tech East - Examining Coastal Operations

EXPERTS from navies, academia and industry are meeting in Tokyo to examine the unique challenges of operating in the littoral or coastal environment. The Littoral OPTECH East workshop is being held in Tokyo, Japan this week with the academic leadership of the Littoral Operations Center (LOC) at the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. OPTECH East has the support of the U.S. Office of Naval Research Global, and with the participation of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, Swedish Navy and the defense company, Saab. Vice Adm. Joseph Aucoin, who commands the U.S.

Department of the  USN

USN Announces 2015 Young Investigators

It's a career-defining moment for 36 college and university faculty April 30, as the Department of the Navy announces the recipients of its 2015 Young Investigator Program, one of the oldest and most selective scientific research advancement programs in the country. Collectively, awardees will receive $18.8 million in grants to fund research across a range of naval-relevant science and technology areas. This is a banner year for the program, administered by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), which increased funding by 50 percent over last year.

Sailors train on a new diesel generator simulator during a project review at Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division in Orlando, Fla. The simulator, which uses high-fidelity 3D software. Pic by USN

3D-Simulator Generates Training, Expertise on Subs

A new diesel generator simulator has been delivered to Pearl Harbor naval facilities by the TechSolutions program at the Office of Naval Research (ONR), officials at ONR announced March 18. High-fidelity 3D software will allow Sailors to use 50-inch touch screens to see and access all parts of the massive generators aboard Virginia-class subs. The Navy's Virginia-class submarines are among the most technically advanced vessels ever built. But even these cutting-edge, fast-attack, nuclear-powered boats need emergency generators on hand and Sailors trained to operate and repair them.

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert, speaks during the Naval Future Force Science and Technology (S&T) EXPO. The EXPO provides broad access to Office of Naval Research (ONR) research, people and opportun

Whats Needed for Future Force

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert outlined his thoughts Feb. 4 on three science and technology objectives for the Navy and Marine Corps of the future, at the Naval Future Force Science and Technology (S&T) EXPO in Washington, D.C. Speaking before nearly 3,000 attendees from across government, academia and industry, Greenert charged his audience to reduce reliance on gunpowder; increase stamina for underwater unmanned vehicles' power and propulsion systems; and increase focus on cybersecurity.

The Office of Naval Research-sponsored Shipboard Autonomous Firefighting Robot (SAFFiR) undergoes testing aboard the Naval Research Laboratory's ex-USS Shadwell in Mobile, Ala. SAFFiR is a bipedal humanoid robot being devel

Navy Unveils Firefighting Robot

Scientists unveiled a firefighting robot prototype Feb. 4 at the Naval Future Force Science & Technology EXPO, revealing details about its successful demonstrations last fall. The Shipboard Autonomous Firefighting Robot (SAFFiR), sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), walked across uneven floors, used thermal imaging to identify overheated equipment, and used a hose to extinguish a small fire in a series of experiments Nov. 3-5, 2014 aboard the USS Shadwell, a decommissioned Navy vessel.

Naval EXPO Coming to Washington

For the first time ever, the general public will be admitted free to the Naval Future Force Science and Technology EXPO general exhibit hall Feb. 4-5 where they will be able to see the Electromagnetic Railgun, an autonomous swarmboat, a firefighting robot and much more. Held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C., the EXPO is the Navy's premiere science and technology (S&T) event, held every two years to showcase some of the Navy's latest technologies and bring together the brightest minds from around the world to share information…

USN Railgun at Future Force EXPO

The Electromagnetic Railgun-a weapon that will play a significant role in the future of the U.S. Navy-will be on display to the public for the first time on the East Coast Feb. 4-5 at the Naval Future Force Science and Technology (S&T) EXPO in Washington, D.C., officials at the Office of Naval Research (ONR) announced Jan. 13. With Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert set as the event's keynote speaker on Feb. 4, the EXPO promises to be a window into the future of the U.S. Navy, showcasing the latest advances in power projection and force protection.

Dr. John C. Daidola (Photo courtesy of Webb Institute)

Webb Institute Welcomes Assistant Professor, Daidola

John C. Daidola has joined Webb Institute as Assistant Professor of Structural Engineering. Dr. Daidola is a structural engineer with over forty-years of experience. His early experience was as Design Engineer at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company and as Chief Naval Architect at Storm-Master Boat Corporation. He was employed for 28 years at M. Rosenblatt & Son, Inc., where he worked as Senior Vice President and Engineering Branch Manager. For the last 15 years he worked at the AMSEC LLC, serving as Senior Vice President and Commercial Operations Manager. Dr.

Sean J. Stackley, assistant secretary of the Navy for research development and acquisition, joins Rear Adm. Mathias Winter's daughter as they replace his one-star shoulder boards with two-star shoulder boards during a promo

Full Steam Ahead for Navy's Science

The Office of Naval Research (ONR) has begun a new era, as Rear Adm. Mathias W. Winter-a decorated aviator with advanced degrees in both computer science and national resource strategy-was sworn in as the chief of naval research (CNR). Winter officially took the helm of ONR, the organization that leads Navy and Marine Corps research efforts, during a change-of-command held on Dec. 30. The ceremony was held at the Pentagon and officiated by the Honorable Sean Stackley, assistant secretary of the Navy (research, development and acquisition).

Lt. j.g. Colcord Moore, from Boston, Mass., and Quartermaster 1st Class Howell Trinidad, from Long Beach, Calif., discuss navigation charts in the pilot house of the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Stethem

Breakthrough Capability Keeps Subs, Ships Safe

Interactive software that can dramatically cut the time it takes to plan safe submarine missions is crossing over to the surface fleet and is being installed this month on the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG 53), officials announced Dec. 16. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), the technology adds speed and precision the process of finding the best routes around hazards in waterways around the world. Sailors spend days or even weeks planning a successful navigation route for a mission.

Northrop Grumman Sponsors Maritime RobotX Challenge

Northrop Grumman Corporation is expanding its support for science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education across the globe by sponsoring the Maritime RobotX Challenge in Singapore, Oct. 20-26. Bringing together 15 teams of university students from five countries (United States, Singapore, Korea, Japan and Australia), RobotX challenges each team to develop and test a highly-capable unmanned surface vessel (USV). In addition to the company's sponsorship of the RobotX competition, two Northrop Grumman employees are serving as mentors and judges.

Evolving Threats Met by Market Innovation

A look at commercial off-the-shelf technologies and products designed to mitigate risk at sea and in port. In a post 9/11 world, many facets of maritime security only seem to grow. Global threats, despite best efforts, do not diminish. Chief among these issues are port security, the protection of critical energy assets and the scourge of piracy on the high seas. As the cost of meeting both challenges climbs, ship operators and port executives look to economically manage their risk. The effort weighs heavily on the bottom line at a time when many maritime sectors are struggling in the red.

NAVSEA image

AN/SPY-1 SSSA Completes Critical Design Review

The Critical Design Review (CDR) stage for AN/SPY-1 radar Solid-State Switch Assembly (SSSA)'s high voltage modulator completed Aug. 26, confirming that the design is expected to meet performance requirements. A CDR confirms the system is on track to achieve affordability and cost goals, and establishes the system's initial product baseline. The successful close-out of the CDR milestone means that the SSSA has achieved a high level of maturity, and is ready to start complete hardware design and system testing.

Dr. Kam W. Ng

Former ONR Deputy Director Ng Joins NCE

Marine acoustics company Noise Control Engineering, LLC (NCE) announced that it has hired Dr. Kam W. Ng, formerly the Deputy Director of Research at the Office of Naval Research, as its new Director of Business Development. Dr. Ng will bring his technical and managerial skills to NCE which includes expertise in the areas of Acoustics and Noise Control, Signal Processing and Fault Detection, Smart Materials, Active Nonlinear Control and Science and Technology Management. Dr. Ng’s knowledge and experience will help NCE to establish new markets…

Carol Armstrong, ship sponsor for R/V Neil Armstrong, breaking the bottle across the bow.

Navy Research Vessel Neil Armstrong Christened

Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering company Guido Perla & Associates, Inc. (GPA) announced that the christening ceremony for the Oceanographic Research Vessel AGOR 27, named in honor of the famed Neil Armstrong, was held at Dakota Creek Industries (DCI) in Anacortes, Wash., on March 29, 2014. Kali Armstrong, granddaughter of the late astronaut and the Maid of Honor, sang the National Anthem and Carol Knight Armstrong, Neil Armstrong’s wife, served as the ship’s sponsor, performing the honor of breaking the traditional bottle of champagne across the ship’s bow.

John Newell (Photo courtesy INEC)

Innovative Solutions to Global Trends at INEC 2014

The newly launched program for the 12th International Naval Engineering Conference and Exhibition – INEC 2014, being held at the Marine Establishment Amsterdam in the Netherlands (May 20-22, 2014) features an incomparable line-up drawn from over a dozen countries speaking to the theme ‘Innovative solutions to global trends’. The program includes keynote addresses by Vice Admirals of both the Royal Netherlands Navy and the Royal Navy, and, thanks to the support of the Royal Netherlands Navy, a networking and industrial visit program with the innovative HNLMS Tromp at its heart.

U.S. Navy eyes greater presence in Arctic from 2025

The U.S. Navy is mapping out how to expand its presence in the Arctic beginning around 2020, given signs that the region's once permanent ice cover is melting faster than expected, which is likely to trigger more traffic, fishing and resource mining. "The Arctic is all about operating forward and being ready. We don't think we're going to have to do war-fighting up there, but we have to be ready," said Rear Admiral Jonathan White, the Navy's top oceanographer and navigator, and director of the Navy's climate change task force.

Jose Femenia

Jose Femenia Named Consultant at UtiliVisor

Jose Femenia, former Head of Engineering and Director of the Master of Marine Engineering Program at the United States Merchant Marine Academy, has been named a consultant at utiliVisor. UtiliVisor is an energy advisory firm that offers comprehensive energy monitoring and analysis services for the marine industry, providing accurate, reliable solutions to boost the fuel efficiency of vessels. Mr. Femenia will serve as a technical advisor for utiliVisor clients on shipboard propulsion and power systems. “Jose’s background at the U.S.