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Tuesday, October 22, 2019

Office Of Coast Survey News

(Photo: NOAA)

New Members Join NOAA’s Hydrographic Services Advisory Panel

NOAA acting administrator retired Navy Rear Adm. Tim Gallaudet, Ph.D., has appointed three new members to the Hydrographic Services Review Panel, a federal advisory committee that gives NOAA independent advice for improving a range of services and products that support safe navigation and coastal resilience. Sean M. Duffy Sr., executive director, Big River Coalition, New Orleans, La. Retired USCG Capt. Julie Thomas, senior advisor, Southern California, Coastal Ocean Observing System, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, Calif.

Rear Admiral (select) Shepard Smith (Photo: NOAA)

Smith Named Director of NOAA Coast Survey

President Barack Obama has approved the promotion of Shepard Smith, from captain to rear admiral (lower half), a prerequisite for Smith to become director of NOAA's Office of Coast Survey, after his selection by Department of Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker. Smith's appointment to director will be effective on August 26, 2016. Smith will oversee NOAA's charts and hydrographic surveys, ushering in the next generation of navigational products and services for mariners who need integrated delivery of coastal intelligence data. He succeeds Rear Adm.

Photo: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Cuba, US Sign Memorandum on Maritime Navigation

Representatives of Cuba and the United States signed in Havana a memorandum of understanding (MoU) on cooperation in areas of hydrography and geodesy to improve the safety of maritime navigation. Ambassador Jeffrey DeLaurentis, the Chief of Mission at the U.S. Embassy in Havana, and Col. Candido Alfredo Regalado Gomez, Chief of Cuba’s National Office of Hydrography and Geodesy (ONHG), have signed the MoU. “NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) has a strong interest…

The Hydrographic Services Review Panel advises NOAA on improving services for navigation and coastal resilience. (Credit: NOAA)

New Lineup for NOAA Hydrographic Services Panel

NOAA administrator Kathryn Sullivan, Ph.D., has appointed six members to the Hydrographic Services Review Panel, a federal advisory committee that gives NOAA independent advice for improving a range of services and products that support navigation and coastal resilience. Capt. “Providing coastal communities, boaters, and the commercial maritime industry with timely, reliable, accurate, and authoritative information is essential as we strive to keep commerce flowing through our nation’s ports,” Sullivan said. Rear Admiral Ken Barbor (ret.), U.S. Lawson W. Capt. Gary A. Scott R.

Vitad Pradith (Photo: HYPACK)

Pradith Joins HYPACK Support Team

HYPACK, Inc. announced that Vitad Pradith has joined the HYPACK support team. In his new role, Pradith will work alongside HYPACk’s support team, providing customers with customer support, onsite trainings and system integration. Pradith previously worked as a Physical Scientist at NOAA Office of Coast Survey for the past 11.5 years. His primary role provided the technical direction and support to the Coast Survey Navigation Response Teams (NRT) who are agile teams of hydrographers…

NOAA Chart 11489 shows the so-called 'magenta line': Image courtesy of NOAA

Tell NOAA If You Think the IWR Still Needs the 'Magenta Route'

If you are a recreational boater, fisherman, or another member of the maritime community, NOAA's Office of Coast Survey wants to pick your brain about the "magenta line," which historically depicted the recommended route for the Intracoastal Waterway Route (IWR) on NOAA nautical charts. A recent Federal Register Notice outlines NOAA's options for improving the accuracy of the magenta line, which is presently being removed from new editions of nautical charts. Federal funding does not allow for consistent maintenance of the 3…

Most mariners now use Print-on-Demand nautical charts that are up-to-date to the moment of printing. (Credit: NOAA)

NOAA: End of Traditional Paper Nautical Charts

NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey, which creates and maintains the nation’s suite of over a thousand nautical charts of U.S. coastal waters, announced major changes ahead for mariners and others who use nautical charts. Starting April 13, the federal government will no longer print traditional lithographic (paper) nautical charts, but will continue to provide other forms of nautical charts, including print on demand charts and versions for electronic charting systems. “Like most other mariners…

Chartwork old-style: Photo courtesy of NOAA

Death Knell for NOAA Traditional Paper Nautical Charts

NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey has announced major changes ahead for mariners and others who use nautical charts. Starting April 13, 2014, the federal government will no longer print traditional lithographic (paper) nautical charts . NOAA will continue to provide other forms of nautical charts, including Print-on-Demand paper charts as well as electronic and digital formats. Since 1862, those lithographic nautical charts -- available in marine shops and other stores -- have been printed by the U.S. government and sold to the public by commercial vendors.

Robert J. Walker wreck investigations: Photo courtesy of NOAA

Subsea Wreck Identifed Off NJ Coast 153 Years On

Lost after a violent collision at sea, government and university maritime archaeologists have identified the wreck of the ship 'Robert J. Walker', a steamer that served in the U.S. Coast Survey, a predecessor agency of NOAA. Twenty sailors died when the Walker sank in rough seas in the early morning hours of June 21, 1860, ten miles off Absecon Inlet on the New Jersey coast. The crew had finished its latest surveys in the Gulf of Mexico and was sailing to New York when the Walker was hit by a commercial schooner off New Jersey.

NOAA Mobile App Provides Free Nautical Charts

As recreational boaters gear up for a summer of fun on coastal waters and the Great Lakes, NOAA is testing MyNOAACharts, a new mobile application that allows users to download NOAA nautical charts and editions of the U.S. Coast Pilot. The app, which is only designed for Android tablets for the testing period, will be released today. MyNOAACharts, which can be used on land and on the water, has GPS built-in capabilities that allow users find their positions on a NOAA nautical chart.

Two NOAA Corps Officers aboard 'Fairweather': Photo credit NOAA

Arctic Nautical Charts: NOAA Plans Updates

Less sea ice and more ship traffic means new charts needed for safety. NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey has issued an updated Arctic Nautical Charting Plan , as a major effort to improve inadequate chart coverage for Arctic areas experiencing increasing vessel traffic due to ice diminishment. NOAA plans to create 14 new charts to complement the existing chart coverage. For example, seven of the charts will complete chart coverage from the Alaska Peninsula to Cape Lisburne at the edge of the North Slope…

Signing the Agreement: Photo credit NOAA

NOAA & US Power Squadrons Sign Agreement

NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey & US Power Squadrons sign a Memorandum of Agreement to improve cooperative charting program. Rear Adm. Gerd Glang, director of NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey, recently sat down with John Alter, chief commander of the U.S. Power Squadrons (USPS) to sign up to a collaboration that began fifty years ago. The USPS is a nonprofit organization dedicated to safe boating through instruction in seamanship, navigation, and related subjects. With nearly 40,000 members in more than 400 squadrons across the U.S.

Bayou Goula Area: Image credit NOAA

Not Safe to Anchor After All

NOAA chart reveals underwater hazard for proposed anchorage area near Bayou Goula Crossing channel of Mississippi River. Cartographers from NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey recently flagged a potentially dangerous situation during their review of a proposed federal rule establishing new anchorage areas on the Mississippi River. The proposed anchorage areas were based on non-NOAA charts that did not depict the underwater pipelines. The pipelines, which carry benzene, posed a potential danger if ships dropped anchor on top of them. The pipeline areas are depicted on the NOAA nautical chart.

NOAA Panel to Discuss GOM Maritime Issues

NOAA’s Hydrographic Services Review Panel will meet Nov. 27-29 in New Orleans to discuss hydrographic surveying, nautical charting, tides and current measurements, as well as geodetic and geospatial measurements for the Gulf of Mexico region. The three-day meeting is open to the public, and public comment periods are scheduled in the afternoons. The panel will hear from representatives of the regional maritime community, including port authority officials and marine pilots, the geospatial community, and users of NOAA’s tides and currents information.

Hurricane 'Sandy': Image credit NOAA

NOAA Prepares Hurricane 'Sandy' Maritime Response

Hurricane-force winds are expected along portions of the coast between Chincoteague Virginia and Chatham Massachusetts. As Hurricane 'Sandy' heads north along the Atlantic coast, NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey is deep into preparations for maritime rapid response. Two objectives stand out: move navigation response personnel and assets into position to move quickly once SANDY moves out; and batten down survey vessels, to protect them from storm damage. Coast Survey regularly responds to requests for quick navigation surveys after storms and other damaging events…

Image credit NOAA

New Edition of Seminal US Coast Pilot

The United States Coast Pilot, with one of the Nation’s longest publishing records, like fine wine, improves with age. The United States Coast Pilot®, originally called the American Coast Pilot, has been published for over 200 years. This set of sailing directions for U.S. coastal waters has kept millions of mariners safe from perils at sea. Recently, NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey unveiled yet another improvement to the nine-volume set geared to modern mariners who need updated information as soon as it becomes available.

NOAA 'Fairweather' Photo credit NOAA

Arctic Waters Hydrographic Survey by NOAA

NOAA Ship 'Fairweather' to conduct hydrographic work in the Arctic updating depths measured in the 18th century. NOAA Ship Fairweather begins a 30-day survey mission in the Arctic, scheduled to check a sparsely measured 1,500-nautical mile coastal corridor from Dutch Harbor, Alaska, north through the Bering Strait and east to the Canadian border. The mission will collect needed information to determine NOAA’s future charting survey projects in the Arctic and will cover sea lanes that were last measured by Captain James Cook in 1778.

Photo courtesy of NOAA

NOAA Commissions Survey Ship

NOAA commissions high-tech coastal mapping 'Ferdinand R. Hassler' in Norfolk, Va. The new ship’s primary mission will be to detect and monitor changes to the sea floor. Data collected by the ship will be used to update nautical charts, detect potential hazards to navigation, and enhance our understanding of the ever-changing marine environment. “With the growth in the size of commercial vessels and the importance of waterborne commerce to our economic security, there is a critical need for accurate information about our coastal waterways…

NOAA View of Delgada Canyon: Photo credit NOAA

Ocean Deep Viewing Online Courtesy of NOAA

NOAA has made sea floor maps and other data on the world’s coasts, continental shelves and deep ocean available for easy viewing online. Anyone with Internet access can now explore undersea features and obtain detailed depictions of the sea floor and coasts, including deep canyons, ripples, landslides and likely fish habitat. The new online data viewer compiles sea floor data from the near shore to the deep blue, including the latest high-resolution bathymetric (sea bottom) data collected by NOAA's Office of Coast Survey primarily to support nautical charting.

NOAA Ship Rainier Returns to Alaska for Sea Floor Surveys

NOAA Ship Rainier returns to Alaska to conduct sea floor surveys in support of safe navigation. NOAA Ship Rainier has begun a month long survey of the sea floor near Alaska’s Prince of Wales Island as part of a multi-year effort to update nautical charts for the area. In addition to supporting marine navigation, data acquired by the 231-foot hydrographic survey vessel will also support marine ecosystem studies and improve inundation models for areas vulnerable to tsunamis. “We are pleased to return to Alaska to continue these important surveys…

Hydrographic Services Review Panel Meeting, Oct 26-27

Notice of Open Meeting: The Hydrographic Services Review Panel (HSRP) is a Federal Advisory Committee established to advise the Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere on matters related to the responsibilities and authorities set forth in section 303 of the Hydrographic Services Improvement Act of 1998, its amendments, and such other appropriate matters that the Under Secretary refers to the Panel for review and advice. The public meeting will be held on October 26-27, 2011. October 26 from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; October 27 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

NOAA’s New Chart Supports Puerto Rico Maritime Economy

The Port of San Juan, which is experiencing a tremendous growth of maritime traffic and planning for more, received an additional economic boost today when NOAA debuted a new nautical chart that will make ocean-going vessel traffic safer and more efficient through San Juan Bay and the port area. “There is not only more traffic, but larger vessels are making San Juan their port call,” said Capt. John Lowell, director of NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey. “Mariners asked for NOAA’s help when they started finding themselves too far right of the port entrance,” Lowell said.

NOAA’s Newest Chart to Support Puerto Rico Maritime Economy

The Port of San Juan, which is experiencing a tremendous growth of maritime traffic and planning for more, received an additional economic boost today when NOAA debuted a new nautical chart that will make ocean-going vessel traffic safer and more efficient through San Juan Bay and the port area. “There is not only more traffic, but larger vessels are making San Juan their port call,” said Capt. John Lowell, director of NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey. “Mariners asked for NOAA’s help when they started finding themselves too far right of the port entrance,” Lowell said.

NOAA Begins Production With Esri

GIS Creates Integrated Data Workflow for More Efficient Chart Production. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has implemented a new nautical charting system based on Esri GIS technology to produce more navigational products than ever before without increasing its budget or personnel needs. The new system, NCS II, is based on Esri Nautical Solution, and it allows NOAA to centralize the management of hydrographic data for US coastal waters. Since accepting Esri Nautical Solution as part of its production system in 2009…

New Edition of U.S. Chart No. 1 Available

U.S. Chart No.1, Nautical Chart Symbols, Abbreviations and Terms, is an essential aid for new chart users and a useful reference for all mariners. The latest version, Edition 11, is now available for free download from the web. The new edition updates the descriptions and depictions of the basic nautical chart elements and symbols used on nautical charts produced by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA).

Sea Floor Surveys Support Texas Maritime Trade

This winter, NOAA will begin a year-long survey of the sea floor in the Port of Houston and Galveston Bay navigational areas, to aid efforts to bring more trade, more cargo, more jobs, and more economic benefits to the Houston area. The navigation survey team arrived in Galveston this week, to begin pre-survey preparations with mariners and federal partners. "With bigger ships, crowded sea lanes, and more uses of ocean areas, shipping today is increasingly a task of precision and accuracy," explained NOAA Corps Cmdr. Todd Haupt, chief of the Office of Coast Survey's Navigation Response Branch.