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Sunday, December 16, 2018

Northwest Seaport Alliance News

An aerial view of the NWSA Seattle docks (CREDIT: NWSA)

NWSA's Terminal 18 Breaks Records with 2018 Volume

SSA Marine’s Terminal 18 surpassed 1 million twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs) in yearly container volume last week, marking the first time in Washington state history that a single marine terminal handled a million TEUs in a year.Located in the North Harbor of The Northwest Seaport Alliance, the terminal is on track to top 1.1 million TEUs by the end of 2018. “We are proud to announce that Terminal 18 has handled over 1 million TEUs so far this year,” said Courtney Gregoire, Port of Seattle commission president and co-chair of the NWSA.

(Photo: The Northwest Seaport Alliance)

Seattle/Tacoma Box Volumes Rise in July

The marine cargo operating partnership of the ports of Seattle and Tacoma recorded its best July import volumes since 2010 at 139,567 twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs), an 18.3 percent increase compared to the same month a year ago.At 122,571 TEUs, The Northwest Seaport Alliance’s export volumes also reached their highest level since 2005 and were up 11 percent from the prior year volumes.Total international container volumes at increased 14.8 percent year over year at 262,139 TEUs.July volumes validated the strong peak season forecasted by importers.

Photo, NWSA imports

NWSA Import Volumes Rise in May 2018

May imports at the Northwest Seaport Alliance of Seattle and Tacoma reached their highest level since 2010 this year.At 131,067 TEUs (20-foot equivalent units), import volumes were 0.7 percent above last May's total.Export volumes of 114,227 TEUs marked a 11.2 percent decrease from the prior year, but were still above the five-year average.At 245,294 TEUs, the total international container volumes decreased 5.2 percent over the year, with the May 2017 volumes having been inflated during the launch of the new carrier alliances.

© Cliff / Adobe Stock

NWSA’s Export Volumes Grew in April

April exports at the ports of Seattle and Tacoma were up 3.3 percent at 112,645 TEUs (20-foot equivalent units) amid rising trade tensions. At 111,858 TEUs, import volumes through the ports, which together comprise the Northwest Seaport Alliance, were down 5.2 percent from the prior year volumes.Total international container volumes, at 224,503 TEUs, decreased 1.1 percent from April 2017. Total container volumes declined 1.1 percent in April 2018 compared to April 2017 for a total of 279…

Mediterranean Shipping Company’s Laurence, which arrived Thursday, is the largest container ship to call at The Northwest Seaport Alliance’s Terminal 46 in Seattle. Photo NWSA

Largest Containership Visits NWSA’s Terminal

Mediterranean Shipping Company’s Laurence, which arrived Thursday, is the largest container ship to call at The Northwest Seaport Alliance’s Terminal 46 in Seattle. The Laurence has capacity for almost 13,000 20-foot equivalent container units (TEUs). If laid end-to-end, the 13,000 TEUs would stretch to the top of Mount Rainier 18 times, a distance of almost 50 miles. At 1,200 feet long and 159 feet wide, the Laurence is about as long as two Space Needles laid end to end. Larger…

(Photo: Northwest Seaport Alliance)

NWSA Box Volumes Grew 6% in February

The Northwest Seaport Alliance said a late Lunar New Year positively impacted its February volumes as shippers moved cargo in advance of the holiday. Total container volumes grew 6 percent in February 2018 compared to February 2017 for a total of 279,488 TEUs. Total international container volume, at 233,643 TEUs, increased 7.4 percent from February 2017. At 125,005 TEUs, import volumes were up 13.4 percent from the prior year volumes. Meanwhile exports were up 1.3 percent at 108,638 TEUs. Total domestic volumes in February decreased 0.7 percent to 45,845 TEUs compared to February 2017.

File Image (CREDIT: AdobeStock / (c) Jim Giddin)

Ending Inefficient Container Shipping Practices

E*DRAY is a Digital Port Logistics Platform dedicated to Transforming Inefficient Container Shipping Industry Practices. E*DRAY, the container shipping industry's first collaborative port logistics technology platform, delivers a new coordinated standard for drayage operations at terminals and container yards. E*DRAY standardizes and scales the block stow, flow stack, and export street turn processes for the import and export community nationwide. By creating this industry standard, cargo owners and drayage companies of all sizes can benefit from the process and platform.

The 761-foot-long heavy-lift ship Zhen Hua 28 transports the first four of Tacoma's eight new super-post-Panamax cranes (Photo: The Northwest Seaport Alliance)

Tacoma’s Giant Container Cranes to Arrive this Week

A heavy-lift ship carrying four of the U.S. West Coast’s largest container cranes is scheduled to travel through Puget Sound on February 23. Puget Sound Pilots are scheduled to board the Zhen Hua 28, a 761-foot-long heavy-lift ship, early Friday morning in Port Angeles and begin the journey to Tacoma. The ship will sit at anchor in Commencement Bay for a day or two before delivering the cranes to Husky Terminal at the northwest end of the Blair Waterway. The Northwest Seaport Alliance ordered eight new super-post-Panamax cranes from Shanghai Zhenhua Heavy Industries Co.

Mario Cordero

West Coast Intermodal Update: Mario Cordero

POLB Executive Director Mario Cordero weighs in from his new West Coast chair, on the most pressing issues of the day. Arguably the industry authority from both the regulatory and commercial sides of the equation, his opinion carries weight and, sometimes, surprises. It has been a busy year at the port of Long Beach, Calif. Lou Anne Bynum, Harbor Commission President at the Port of Long Beach, declared in early October, “Simply put, we are having the best trade months in port history.” Indeed, the port moved more containers last month than in any September in its history.

(Photo: NWSA)

Northwest Seaport Alliance: Innovative, Ideally Located and Together as One

Located in the Pacific Northwest in Washington State, The Northwest Seaport Alliance joining the deep draft ports of Seattle and Tacoma offers shorter U.S.-to-Asia transits, as well as a deep connection to Alaska. And, a lot more. In an era where the fiercely competitive business of global trade is changing in ways that could not have been imagined just one decade ago, ports, terminals and their collective stakeholders are rethinking how to also remain relevant. Shifting liner alliances…

John Wolfe (Photo: The Northwest Seaport Alliance)

Northwest Seaport Alliance CEO Wolfe Receives 2017 Connie Award

John Wolfe, CEO of The Northwest Seaport Alliance, received the 2017 Connie Award presented by the Containerization & Intermodal Institute in Long Beach, Calif., on Tuesday, September 19. Since the formation of the NWSA in August 2015, Wolfe has led the marine cargo operating partnership of the ports of Seattle and Tacoma. “This is an incredible honor for John and The Northwest Seaport Alliance,” said Tom Albro, Port of Seattle commission president and co-chair of The Northwest Seaport Alliance. “John leads through hard work and a well-grounded vision.

(Photo: The Northwest Seaport Alliance)

Tacoma to Add Four More Container Cranes

The Northwest Seaport Alliance to purchase four more container cranes, invest additional $2.9 million in Seattle and Tacoma, Wash. Managing members of the Northwest Seaport Alliance have approved a $52 million purchase of four more container cranes to join four others already on order for Husky Terminal in the South Harbor in Tacoma. They also approved an additional $2.9 million in improvements at Seattle’s Terminal 18 in the North Harbor and Tacoma’s West Hylebos Log Yard and Pierce County Terminal in the South Harbor.

Glovis Composer (Photo: Northwest Seaport Alliance)

Tacoma Preparing for Its Largest Ever Auto Import

A roll-on/roll-off (ro-ro) vessel carrying a shipment of more than 4,800 vehicles from South Korea is scheduled to arrive January 9 at Tacoma’s Terminal 7, marking the single-largest auto discharge in Port of Tacoma history. At 656 feet long and 106 feet wide, the ship Glovis Composer has a total capacity to transport 6,400 vehicles. During this call, the South Harbor will receive six high and heavy cargoes in addition to 4,818 vehicles to be transported throughout the country as far east as Ohio, according to the Northwest Seaport Alliance.

Photo: Northwest Seaport Alliance

Seattle/Tacoma Container Volumes Up 8% for 2017

The Northwest Seaport Alliance, consisting of the ports of Seattle and Tacoma, has recorded an 8 percent year-to-date increase in container cargo through February. International container volumes for the month of February remained steady with a 9.1 percent year-to-date increase despite fewer sailings. Compared to same time last year, full export loads saw a 4 percent increase, and import loads were up more than 7 percent for the year. As anticipated, we saw fewer vessel arrivals and amended service schedules by ocean carriers in February due to the Lunar New Year holiday…

Photo: Northwest Seaport Alliance

Northwest Seaport Alliance Joins Green Marine

The Northwest Seaport Alliance has signed on to participate in Green Marine, North America’s largest voluntary environmental certification program for the maritime industry. Green Marine encourages its participants—ship owners, ports and terminals—to reduce their environmental footprint related to air quality, greenhouse gases, spill prevention, stormwater treatment, noise and other community impacts and environmental leadership. More than 50 environmental groups and government departments/agencies support and help shape the Green Marine environmental program…

Northwest Seaport Alliance Adds Two New Leaders

Zachary Thomas has joined the Northwest Seaport Alliance (NWSA) to lead the Operations Service Center (OSC), and Bob Meyer has been promoted to lead port operations and manage safety. In his new position, Thomas leads efforts to partner with stakeholders from across the supply chain to improve the efficiency and cost-competitiveness of the Puget Sound gateway. The Operations Service Center, the headquarters for the NWSA’s customer success initiatives, is guided by a group of industry representatives called the Executive Advisory Council.

Image:  Port of Seattle

Seattle and Tacoma Ports Cement Alliance

The port commissions of Seattle and Tacoma voted unanimously to form the Northwest Seaport Alliance, unifying the longtime rivals’ marine cargo divisions. The alliance aimed at helping the former rivals stave off growing competition, and regain market share. "The Seaport Alliance is an effort for the ports to keep their operations competitive," say local media. Facing increased competition from Port Metro Vancouver and Prince Rupert, the Northwest Seaport Alliance will allow Seattle and Tacoma to work together as the third-largest U.S. container gateway.

Photo: Don Wilson / Port of Seattle

Northwest Seaport Alliance Extends Peak Season Gate Hours

The Northwest Seaport Alliance said it will reimburse up to $2 million to extend gate hours at its international container terminals during peak season. With a 3 to 5 percent increase in cargo volume forecasted during peak season, which will start in late August and continue through early November, the alliance proposes to help the marine terminal operators avoid congestion on surface streets in the port industrial area and keep import and export cargo flowing efficiently. This program will reimburse terminal operators for some of the costs to operate flexed gates from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m.

Photo: Northwest Seaport Alliance

Seattle’s Terminal 5 Closer to Becoming ‘Big Ship Ready’

The Port of Seattle has completed the environmental analysis of Terminal 5 and has prepared the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) on the project to modernize the cargo-handling facility in order to serve larger cargo vessels. The proposed upgrades to Terminal 5 are wharf rehabilitation, berth deepening, electrical service and improvements to the upland portions of the property. “Based on public comment we are including a number of improvements, such as shore power for vessels…

Image: Northwest Seaport Alliance

New Apps Aim to Save Fuel, Accelerate Cargo Flow

The Northwest Seaport Alliance said it is set to launch two new mobile applications in early November aiming to help speed the flow of containers through port facilities and along local freight corridors, reduce idling-related air emissions and save fuel at the Port of Seattle and Port of Tacoma. DrayQ aims to give truck drivers real-time information about wait times in and around marine cargo terminals, and DrayLink will interconnect the drayage community to better dispatch, track and record container moves from pickup to delivery.

Port of Seattle image by Don Wilson

Seattle and Tacoma Report Strong October Box Volumes

The ports of Seattle and Tacoma reported October full load import and export volumes that were the strongest for the month since 2012. Year to date, imports and exports for October continue to support a strong peak season for the Northwest Seaport Alliance (NWSA), with an 11 percent increase and 16 percent increase, respectively. To support this peak shipping season’s strong agricultural exports, the NWSA has lengthened the extended gates program through December 2. The main commodities moving through our gateway are hay, forest products, and fruits and vegetables.

Photo: The Northwest Seaport Alliance

World's Largest Single-deck Log Ship Calls Tacoma

The world’s largest single-deck bulk/log carrier, Olive Bay, arrived Thursday at The Northwest Seaport Alliance’s West Hylebos log terminal in Tacoma. The terminal, operated by Seattle-based Merrill & Ring Forest Products, welcomed Pacific Basin Shipping’s Olive Bay, the largest ship in the Chinese log business to call the West Coast. Built in 2015 specifically to carry logs, the ship is 190 meters long and 32 meters wide. It can hold up to 8 million board-feet of logs, which is significantly more than the 5 million-board-foot capacity of most log ships to call Tacoma.