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Tuesday, July 16, 2019

National Hurricane Center News

File Image: A containership transits the Port of New Orleans on a better day. Image CREDIT: Port NOLA

New Orleans Braces for TS Barry

Some residents and visitors prepared to flee New Orleans on Thursday as Tropical Storm Barry closed in and city officials warned of severe flooding if it makes landfall by early Saturday as the first Atlantic hurricane of the 2019 season.The storm had maximum sustained winds of 40 miles per hour (64 kph) as of 10 a.m. CDT (1500 GMT) on Thursday, the National Weather Service said.Forecasters issued a storm-surge warning for a stretch of Louisiana coastline south of already-sodden New Orleans stretching from the mouth of the Atchafalaya River to Shell Beach.

File Image: AdobeStock / © mode list

National Hurricane Center Miami Issues Hurricane Watch

A Storm Surge Watch is in effect for: Mouth of the Pearl River to Intracoastal City. A Hurricane Watch is in effect for: Mouth of the Mississippi River to Cameron. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for: Mouth of the Mississippi River northward to the Mouth of the Pearl River.A Storm Surge Watch means there is a possibility of life-threatening inundation from rising water moving inland from the coastline in the indicated locations during the next 48 hours. For a depiction of areas at risk please see the National Weather Service Storm Surge Watch/Warning Graphic available at hurricanes.gov.

The latest storm track for Michael. (CREDIT NHC)

Hurricane Michael Races Northeast, Leaving Devastation in Florida

Hurricane Michael, the third most powerful storm ever to strike the U.S. mainland, headed northeast on Thursday, weakened but still set to soak Georgia and the Carolinas after devastating the Florida Panhandle.By 6 AM on Thursday, heavy rain and wind had reached as far north as Charlotte, North Carolina and the Western North Carolina mountains. The center of the storm was located over Augusta, Georgia, moving north rapidly at more than 20 MPH in a north / northeast heading. Charlotte…

NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite VIIRS instrument captured this thermal image on Sept. 20, 2017, at 2:12 a.m. EDT (0612 UTC). At the time, Maria’s eye was just east of the American Virgin Islands, and its northwestern quadrant stretched over Puerto Rico. (Credit: NASA Goddard Rapid Response Team)

Weakened Maria Could Regain Major Hurricane Status -NHC

Maria, which weakened into a Category 2 hurricane on Wednesday, could regain major hurricane status by Thursday, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said in its latest advisory. Catastrophic flash flooding was occurring over portions of Puerto Rico with conditions now deteriorating over the eastern Dominican Republic, the NHC said. The hurricane was about 25 miles (45 km) north northwest of Aguadilla, Puerto Rico with maximum sustained winds of 110 miles per hour (175 km per hour), the Miami-based NHC said. Any hurricane with top sustained winds of at least 111 is classified as major.

Commercial Ports along Florida's West Coast Reopened

The U.S. Coast Guard said it had reopened all commercial ports along Florida's west coast on Friday, while hurricane Matthew continued to lash the northeast coast of the state. Matthew was located about 60 miles (95 kilometers) southeast of Jacksonville Beach in Florida with maximum sustained winds of 115 mph (185 km/h), according to the latest advisory from the National Hurricane Center. The hurricane was forecast to move near or over the coast of northeast Florida and Georgia through Friday night, and near or over the coast of South Carolina on Saturday.

El Faro (File photo: TOTE)

Collision Course with a Hurricane: How Doomed US Ship Met its End

The ill-fated U.S.-flagged El Faro cargo ship sunk by Hurricane Joaquin was sailing at near full speed into the center of the storm before it lost propulsion amid mountainous waves and brutal winds, according to ship tracking data. The data on Thomson Reuters Eikon raises questions about the ship owner's assertion that the vessel's captain had chosen a "sound plan" to pass around Joaquin "with a margin of comfort" but was then thwarted by engineering problems. It shows that even…

Images of HURRICANE JOAQUIN

USCG Urge Caution Ahead of Hurricane Joaquin

The Coast Guard urges the public Thursday to use extreme caution and to prepare for the onset of heavy weather, extreme sea conditions, storm surge and high surf throughout the Mid Atlantic region as Hurricane Joaquin approaches the coast. Stay informed: The public should monitor the progress and strength of Hurricane Joaquin through local television, radio and internet. Information can also be obtained on small craft advisories and warnings on VHF radio channel 16. The National Weather Service predicts off shore conditions to include waves reaching up to 53 feet in height.

Hurricane Gonzalo Knocks out Bermuda Power

Power was knocked out to 80 percent of Bermuda's electricity grid due to Hurricane Gonzalo, the island's only power company, Bermuda Electric Light Co., said on Friday evening.   The company reported that about 29,000 customers were without electricity, out of 36,000 metered connections. The eyewall of Hurricane Gonzalo made a direct hit on Bermuda on Friday evening, becoming the strongest storm to hit the tiny Atlantic island chain in a decade, according to the U.S. National Hurricane Center. (Writing by David Adams; Editing by Ken Wills)

Infrared satellite image

Hurricane Ana Heads towards Hawaii

Tropical Storm Ana strengthened into a hurricane on Friday and was moving in the direction of Hawaii but was not expected to make a direct hit on the islands, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said. It said Ana had maximum sustained winds of 75 miles per hour (120 kph) and was located 230 miles (365 km) south of Hilo on the Big Island. The center's storm tracking map showed Ana passing south of the Hawaiian islands. No hurricane has landed a direct hit on Hawaii since Iniki, a Category 4 storm that struck in September of 1992, killing six people and causing damages estimated at $2.4 billion.

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Mariners Urged to Prepare for Storm ANA

The public is advised to use extreme caution and prepare for the onset of heavy weather expected to generate extreme sea conditions, storm surge and high surf throughout the Main Hawaiian Islands prior to the arrival of Troppical Storm Ana. Mariners should secure their boats and boating equipment. Owners of large boats are urged to move their vessels to protected marinas where they will be less likely to break free of their moorings or to be otherwise damaged. It may be advisable for smaller boats to be pulled from the water and stored in a place that is not prone to flooding and is protected.

Storm Fay Heads for Bermuda

Subtropical Storm Fay formed in the Atlantic Ocean on Friday and was headed in the direction of Bermuda, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said. The storm, which had maximum sustained winds of 40 miles per hour (65 kph), was located 525 miles (845 km) south of Bermuda and was expected to reach the British territory on Sunday morning, the Miami-based center said. (Reporting by Sandra Maler in Washington; Editing by Will Dunham)

Tropical Storm Polo Threatens Battered Mexican Resort of Los Cabos

Tropical storm Polo barreled nearer on Friday to the Mexican Pacific resort of Los Cabos where thousands of troops were restoring order following widespread chaos caused by Hurricane Odile at the start of the week. Odile plowed into the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula on Sunday as a category 3 hurricane, causing major damage to beach resorts and sparking widespread looting. The U.S. National Hurricane Center said a tropical storm warning was in effect from Santa Fe to La Paz on the normally arid peninsula…

(Credit: NOAA)

NOAA to Use New Hurricane Wind Scale

NOAA's National Weather Service will use a new hurricane scale this season called the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. The scale keeps the same wind speed ranges as the original Saffir-Simpson Scale for each of the five hurricane categories, but no longer ties specific storm surge and flooding effects to each category. Herbert Saffir, a consulting engineer, and Robert Simpson, who was director of the National Hurricane Center from 1967 through 1973, developed the original scale which was a useful tool to convey the threats of tropical cyclones.

Crowley Get NOAA Award: Photo credit Crowley

NOAA Recognises Crowley Vessels with VOS Award

Crowley Maritime Corporation has been selected as a 2011 Company Award winner for the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)'s Voluntary Observing Ship (VOS) program. The selection was based on Crowley's 48 vessels providing 204,430 highly accurate and timely weather observations for the U.S. VOS program in 2011. Particularly impressive was Crowley's St. Louis Express, a cargo vessel contributing 4,926 observations in 2011, ranking her the second-highest reporting vessel in the entire U.S. program.

U.S. Navy Pursues Better Weather Forecasting

Navy Researchers Seek to Improve Weather Prediction for Global Operations. With the Atlantic hurricane season officially beginning this month, the Office of Naval Research (ONR) is pursuing a number of projects to help Navy forecasters and meteorologists around the world predict storms better. ONR's efforts in funding ocean research are yielding enhanced weather and ocean prediction models-highlighted in a new video-that help Navy leaders understand how to route ships around the globe to avoid storms, reduce fuel consumption, avoid Arctic ice flows and promote safety at sea.

Edouard to be First Major 2014 Atlantic Hurricane

Edouard, a Category 2 hurricane, may become the first major hurricane of the 2014 Atlantic season by Monday night although it poses no threat to land, the National Hurricane Center said. The fourth hurricane and fifth named storm of the season had top sustained winds of nearly 105 mph (165 km/hr) as of 0900 GMT on Monday with higher gusts, and was forecast to strengthen further as it headed northwestwards over the central Atlantic. The center of the storm was about 720 miles east-southeast of Bermuda…