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Thursday, November 26, 2020

National Energy Board News

A crude oil train segment rumbles alongside a U.S. inland waterway. CREDIT: Dagmar Etkin

Canadian Natural Resources eyes Rail Contracts

Canadian Natural Resources, the country's biggest oil and gas producer, is looking at taking on the Alberta provincial government's contracts to move crude by rail, a senior company executive said on Thursday.Shipping more crude by rail is seen as critical for Canadian oil producers due to congested pipelines that forced Alberta to order mandatory oil curtailments this year.Alberta's United Conservative Party government said in June that it would divest rail contracts amounting to 120,000 barrels of crude per day (bpd) to the private sector this fall.

Photo courtesy of U.S. Department of Transportation

Canada Should Bring in Stronger Rail Cars for Crude Before 2025 - official

Canada ought to require stronger tank cars for transporting flammable liquids sooner than the current deadline in 2025, Transportation Safety Board Chair Kathy Fox said on Thursday, noting that crude-by-rail shipments are expected to rise in the country."We understand that it can't happen all at once. But we'd like to see it sooner," Fox said in an interview, without giving a specific alternative date. "We do have an ongoing concern that flammable liquids be transported in the…

© Charlie Bird / Adobe Stock

Rail Shipments of Canadian Oil to US Seen Rising over 60%

Canadian crude shipments to the United States by rail could rise more than 60 percent this year on demand by Gulf Coast refiners for the heavy crudes and the wide differential between Canadian grades and the U.S. benchmark. The rail shipments could reach as much as 350,000 barrels per day (bpd) by year end and average some 400,000 bpd in 2019, estimated analysts at Tudor, Pickering, Holt & Co. Last year, the shipments averaged 130,000 bpd, according to U.S. government data. Canadian crudes have been replacing heavy oil from Venezuela and Mexico at the Gulf Coast…

Exxon, BP Defer Canadian Arctic Drilling

As Imperial Oil, as senior partner in the northern venture with ExxonMobil and BP, told Canada’s National Energy Board (NEB) that the exploration program has been deferred, the plan to revive arctic gas and oil drilling in deep Canadian waters of the Beaufort Sea ground to a halt. The slow pace of regulatory review has left too little time to finish the approval process and does the work before the group's drilling leases expire, Imperial said in a filing at the board. The partners – Calgary-based Imperial…

LNG export terminal by 2018: AltaGas

AltaGas says it is on track to build a liquefied natural gas plant in British Columbia by 2018. The Canadian Press is reporting this morning comments made by AltaGas CEO refuting a recent International Energy Agency report saying LNG will be a slow industry to take off, with no facility built in the country by 2020. “We think we’ll prove them wrong in this decade,” David Cornhill told the Canadian Press in an interview. The proposed project is headed by the Douglas Channel LNG Consortium…

Regulatory Profile: William P. Doyle, Commissioner of the Federal Maritime Commission

If the Federal Maritime Commission remains somewhat of an enigma to domestic maritime stakeholders, perhaps that’s because its scope of oversight reaches many sectors of maritime business; some more obscure than others. In February, we caught up with FMC commissioner William P. Doyle, who provided the perfect primer on this important agency. What does it take to become a Federal Maritime Commissioner? Doyle was sworn in on January 10, 2013 as Commissioner of the Federal Maritime Commission.

Canada Announces Arctic Offshore Drilling Rules

The National Energy Board (NEB or the Board) released filing requirements today for future applications to drill in the Canadian Arctic Offshore. The Filing Requirements, a companion document to The Past is Always Present, Review of Offshore Drilling in the Canadian Arctic, Preparing for the Future, follows several months of extensive consultation carried out across the North during the NEB’s Arctic Review. During the Arctic Review, many Northern residents stated that if drilling is to be authorized in the unique Arctic environment, it must be done right.