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Saturday, October 24, 2020

John Maggs News

John Maggs. Photo: Seas at Risk

Massive Benefits in Reducing Ship Speeds

Cutting the speed of ships has huge benefits for humans, nature and the climate, according to a new report, a new report published by Seas at Risk and Transport & Environment (T&E) has highlighted.A 20% reduction would cut greenhouse gases but also curb pollutants that damage human health such as black carbon and nitrogen oxides, according to the two Brussels-based environmental NGOs."The large positive effect that reduced speeds can have on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is well known.

Photo:  International Maritime Organization (IMO)

Fast, Quick Action Needed to Meet Paris Climate Goals: CAN

The International Maritime Organisation (IMO) has agreed on an initial strategy to decarbonise international shipping and reduce emissions from ships by at least 50% by 2050. While this agreement falls short of the 70 to 100% reductions by 2050 that the Pacific Islands, the EU and others were calling for ahead of the meeting, it keeps a window open to meet the Paris climate goals and is undeniably a game changer for the shipping sector. This plan serves as a welcome first step to phase out emissions from the sector…

Photo: Seas At Risk

The Efficiency of New Ships is Falling: CE Delft Study

Recent improvements in the design efficiency of new ships went into reverse last year, a new independent study has found. According to the CE Delft study the average design efficiency of new bulk carriers, oil tankers and gas carriers was worse in 2016 than in 2015. The share of new ships complying with future efficiency standards also decreased in 2016. The design efficiency of containerships and general cargo ships appears to be stagnating after a period of improvement. The…

Photo: CMA CGM

Experts Say Shipping Emissions Must Peak Soon to Achieve Paris Goals

International shipping and aviation will have to cap their greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) soon for the world to meet the ambitious goals laid down in the Paris Climate Change Agreement, participants at a side event at the Bonn climate change conference heard today. Emissions of carbon dioxide from aviation and shipping are growing at a combined rate of 3-5 percent annually. Efforts by the United Nations bodies overseeing these sectors to agree and adopt strategies to address climate change have moved forward but critical action areas remain to be fully addressed, panelists in the session said.

File photo: Alex Sergienko

Study: Ship Efficiency Standards Too Weak to Drive Improvements

Shipping’s only legally binding climate measure is not stimulating the uptake of new technologies or driving efficiency improvements, according to a new independent study. Since 2013 newly-built ships subject to the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) design fuel efficiency standard – known as the EEDI – have performed much the same as those not covered, the report for NGOs Seas At Risk (SAR) and Transport & Environment (T&E) finds. According to the study, at least two-thirds of containerships…

Photo: The Institution of Engineering and Technology

Excluding Shipping Emissions from COP Deal Makes 2°C Limit Close to Impossible

The dropping of international aviation and shipping emissions from the draft Paris climate agreement published this afternoon has fatally undermined the prospects of keeping global warming below 2°C, green NGOs Seas At Risk and Transport & Environment (T&E) have said. As their emissions uniquely fall outside national reduction targets, they require an explicit reference in the agreement. If treated as countries, global aviation and shipping would both make the list of top 10 emitters.

IMO Urged to Provide Access to Efficiency Data

Shipping Fuel Transparency Will Lower Emissions and Cut Costs. NGOs call on shipping industry regulator to drive down costs, trigger improved fuel efficiency and reduce ship GHG emissions through efficiency data transparency. Transport & Environment, Seas at Risk and Carbon War Room are urging the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) not to withhold data on ship efficiency and fuel consumption. The call for action follows moves by some industry groups to undermine initiatives…

NGO's Condemn IMO Environmental Implementation Delays

The International Maritime Organisation (IMO) today decided to postpone the entry into force of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions limits for ship engines from 2016 to 2021. Environmental NGOs Transport & Environment (T&E) and Seas at Risk, founding members of the IMO observer organisation Clean Shipping Coalition, condemn IMO’s decision and now call on the EU to adopt its own NOx limits for cleaner air. The decision taken at a meeting in London of the IMO working group reviewing MARPOL Annex VI [1]…