28671 members and growing – the largest networking group in the maritime industry!

LoginJoin

Monday, July 22, 2019

James River News

John F. Reinhart, CEO and executive director of the Virginia Port Authority (VPA).

INSIGHTS: John F. Reinhart, CEO, Virginia Port Authority (VPA)

John F. Reinhart is the CEO and executive director of the Virginia Port Authority (VPA). He is responsible for the broad programmatic areas of business development and growth, strategic marketing, finance, and operations of Virginia’s marine terminal facilities: Virginia International Gateway, Newport News Marine Terminal, Norfolk International Terminals, Portsmouth Marine Terminal, Richmond Marine Terminal and the Virginia Inland Port.Under his leadership, the goal has been to…

the Baton Rouge-NOLA container on barge service / CREDIT: Port of New Orleans

SHORTSEA SHIPPING: All the Right Moves (Finally)

Marine Highways Gain Traction in the Intermodal Supply Chain.In the United States, landside infrastructure is at a crisis point. Congestion at the big hub ports, exacerbated by imperfect intermodal interfaces with surface transport serving cargo hinterlands is at the heart of the matter. As politicians bicker over a possible infrastructure package, the Highway Trust Fund, funded by taxes on gasoline and diesel fuel, has continued its downward journey towards further deficits (now $144 billion). And, where countless U.S.

Container on Barge (Photo: PortNOLA)

MARAD Awards $6.7m in Marine Highway Grants

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration (MARAD) has announced $6,790,000 in grants to three Marine Highway projects. The funding, provided by MARAD’s Marine Highway Program, will go towards enhancing existing services in Louisiana and Virginia as well as supporting the development of a new project in New York.“These grants will expand the use of our country’s waterways, which are essential to our economic growth and vitality,” said U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine L. Chao.

An unmanned rigid-hull inflatable boat operates autonomously during an Office of Naval Research (ONR)-sponsored demonstration of swarmboat technology held at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story. During the demonstration four boats, using an ONR-sponsored system called CARACaS (Control Architecture for Robotic Agent Command Sensing), operated autonomously during various scenarios designed to identify, trail or track a target of interest. (U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams)

Video: US Navy Tests Autonomous Swarmboats

The U.S. Navy is examining new possibilities for autonomy in future naval missions, putting autonomous unmanned vessels to the test in a recent demonstration in the lower Chesapeake Bay. Officials from the Office of Naval Research (ONR), together with partners from industry, academia and other government organizations, leveraged a combination of high-tech software, radar and other sensors to get a “swarm” of rigid hull inflatable boats (RHIBs) and other small vessels – “swarmboats” – to collectively perform autonomous patrol missions with only remote human supervision.

US Awards $4.85 Mln for Waterways Projects

U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx today announced $4.85 million in grants to six Marine Highway projects along the waterways of 17 states and the District of Columbia. The goal of the Maritime Administration’s Marine Highway Program is to expand the use of U.S. navigable waterways to relieve landside congestion, reduce air emissions and generate other public benefits by increasing the efficiency of the surface transportation system. “These grants will help us take advantage…

The sun rises over Pre-Commissioning Unit Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), marking the beginning of the second day of Fast Cruise. Ford is conducting a three-day Fast Cruise to familiarize the crew with the ship's systems for an extended period of time. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Ryan CarterReleased)

Ford Achieves Important Milestone

Pre-Commissioning Unit Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) completed its turn ship evolution June 11. This is a major milestone that brings the country's newest nuclear powered aircraft carrier another step closer to delivery and commissioning later this year. "Turning the ship is an opportunity for the crew to demonstrate for the first time all the procedures required to get the ship underway safely," said Commanding Officer Capt. Richard McCormack. This operation marks the first time Ford has moved from its pier since coming out of dry dock in November 2013. The ship's stern now faces the James River.

Photo: CMA CGM

Richmond Now Destination for CMA CGM

CMA CGM has signed an agreement with the Port of Virginia to add the Port of Richmond as a destination for shippers booking cargo on its ships. The Port Virginia announced a cooperative effort with ocean carrier CMA CGM that will greatly enhance service at the Port of Richmond, an upriver barge terminal located on Interstate 95 that extends the port’s inland reach by 90 miles. The growing, world-wide ocean carrier is offering a Richmond bill of lading to the shipping public, both importers and exporters.

The aircraft carrier Pre-Commissioning Unit Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) transits the James River during the ship's launch and transit to Newport News Shipyard pier three for the final stages of construction and testing.

USN Successfully Tests Electromagnetic Catapult on CVN 78

The Navy conducted the first-ever, shipboard, full-speed catapult shots using the Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) aboard the aircraft carrier Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), Naval Sea Systems Command announced May 15. EMALS is a carrier-based launch system designed to expand the operational capability of the Navy's future carriers to include all current and future planned carrier aircraft. The recent test shots, known as "no-loads" because no aircraft or other loads were attached to the launching shuttle…

Photo: Norwegian Cruise Line

Madsen to Head Norwegian Cruise Line

Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd. announced today that Drew Madsen has joined the company as president and chief operating officer of Norwegian Cruise Line. Madsen brings more than 30 years of leadership experience in the hospitality and consumer products industry, most recently as president and chief operating officer at Darden Restaurants, Inc. Prior to Darden, Drew held leadership and marketing positions at James River Corporation and General Mills, among others. "Having delivered exceptional results during his tenure at Darden…

Newport News Fosters Home-grown Talent

Newport News’ Apprentice School seeks to go beyond training workers; it seeks to build leaders. The Apprentice School at Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Newport News Shipbuilding division offers an invaluable educational and career opportunity for those seeking a profession in shipbuilding, but the school’s benefits extend much further than that. Within the HII business, the company uses the program to groom its apprentices for leadership roles within its managerial and corporate ladder.

VP Biden speaks at the Port of Virginia (DOT photo)

Biden Champions Maritime at Port of Virginia

Carrying 95 percent of U.S. foreign trade, our maritime transportation system, which includes America’s ports, is a crucial component of our nation’s economy. And with our growing population—and the associated need to increase the amount of freight our transportation network carries—maritime’s value will only grow in the future. This point is not lost on the Obama Administration, and it’s the reason why Vice President Joe Biden joined U.S. Senator Mark Warner (D-Va.), U.S. Rep.

Car-plunge Ferry Sets Off Coast Guard Investigation

The Coast Guard is investigating an incident that happened aboard the Jamestown-Scotland Ferry which resulted in an intending passenger's car tumbling into the James River. 4. whether the incident should be further investigated. "The Coast Guard is taking this incident very seriously," said Capt. John Little, the commander of Coast Guard Sector Hampton Roads.

Battleship Wisconsin: Photo credit Wiki CCL

Volunteer Surveyors Check Battleship 'Wisconsin'

Inspectors from the Navy's Board of Inspection & Survey (INSURV) conduct a survey aboard the floating museum ship. After a storied history beginning in World War II, the battleship received its last official INSURV inspection in 1992, before becoming a floating museum on the James River. John Elliker, Battleship Wisconsin project manager, said the city of Norfolk initially contacted INSURV to ask them about surveying the ship. The conversation progressed into the INSURV team volunteering…

'Minnesota' Heads for NNS' Submarine Pier: Photo credit HII

NNS Launch US Submarine 'Minnesota'

Huntington Ingalls Industries' Newport News Shipbuilding Division launches Virginia-class submarine Minnesota (SSN 783). To achieve her latest milestone, the 7,800-ton Minnesota was moved out of a construction facility into a floating dry dock using a transfer car system. The floating dry dock was submerged, and Minnesota was launched into the James River. Once in the water, tugboats moved the submarine to NNS' submarine pier, where final outfitting and testing will take place. As many as 1,000 shipbuilders have worked on Minnesota, the 10th Virginia-class submarine.

Obsolete US Ship Recycling Target Surpassed

U.S. Transportation Secretary visits Suisun Bay in Northern California to celebrate surpassing administration's goal for recycling. Ray LaHood, US Transportation Secretary visited Shuisun Bay for the occasion. In 2010, the Department’s Maritime Administration (MARAD) committed to removing 28 ships from the fleet by September 30, 2012. To date, MARAD has removed 36 ships, with three more vessels scheduled for removal by the end of the year. “Three years ago, the Department of Transportation promised to get rid of the ships that posed a threat to the environment…

Sean Connaughton, Secretary of Transportation for the Commonwealth of Virginia.

INSIGHTS: Sean T. Connaughton

Sean Connaughton, Secretary of Transportation for the Commonwealth of Virginia, oversees seven state agencies with more than 9,700 employees and combined annual budgets of $5 billion. But this transportation professional is perhaps best known to MarineNews readers as the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administrator during the second Bush Administration. As U.S. Maritime Administrator, he was responsible for the daily management of that agency and its promotional programs for the marine transportation industry.

Atlas Copco Taps James River Equipment

Atlas Copco welcomes its newest drilling equipment distributor, James River Equipment. The company, well-known as a heavy equipment supplier, will represent Atlas Copco in the Carolinas for blasthole rigs, other surface drilling rigs and equipment, and Secoroc rock drilling tools. In North Carolina, James River Equipment will also distribute Atlas Copco’s Dynapac compaction and paving equipment. Equipment covered by this new relationship includes surface crawlers such as Atlas Copco’s SmartROC, FlexiROC, and PowerROC surface rigs, the ROC L8 and the SmartRig F9C.

U.S. DOT Recycles Two More JRRF Ships

The U. S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration has awarded contracts to recycle two more of the obsolete government-owned ships, which are currently moored in the James River Reserve Fleet (JRRF) in Virginia. The two ships being recycled are the Escape and the Cape Cod. These two vessels will be the 83rd and 84th ships to leave the JRRF since 2001. The Escape (ARS-6) was built as a Navy rescue ship in 1942 by Basalt Rock Co. in Napa, Calif. The vessel supported the nation's "Mercury" manned spaceflight program in the early 1960s.

Wrongful Death Lawsuit Against Tug Operator, Navy

After a four-day trial, a federal judge ruled on Dec. 18 in favor of the family of Freddie Porter, Jr., a 19-year-old U.S. Navy enlisted seaman from New Jersey who in 2007 was killed when the small craft carrying him was overrun by a tugboat pushing a large flotilla on Virginia's James River. The tug, owned and operated by Vulcan Materials Company, collided with the Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat (RHIB) carrying Porter as he engaged in nighttime military training exercises. The court found the United States Navy 80 percent responsible for Porter's death and Vulcan 20 percent responsible…

Photo courtesy TITAN Salvage

TITAN to Handle Decommissioned Monongahela

TITAN Salvage has been retained to handle salvage of the Monongahela, a decommissioned tanker ship that broke loose from its moorings on the night of Nov. 12. The tanker ship, which is part of the James River Reserve Fleet (JRRF), was affected by a severe storm and unusually high water surges in the James River and nearby vicinity when it was wind driven aground on soft soil, approximately one-half mile downstream of the JRRF near the western bank of the river. TITAN has completed hydrographic surveys for use in the finite salvage calculations required for a salvage plan.

Monongahela Successfully Refloated

Acting Maritime Administrator David Matsuda announced that the Monongahela, one of the government-owned obsolete ships stored at the James River Fleet, was successfully refloated this morning after being aground since Nov. 13. The ship was refloated during high tide at 11:00 a.m. this morning. The Monongahela ran aground after a three day storm with hurricane force winds caused the vessel to break free of its mooring and drift into shallow water. “The Maritime Administration took extraordinary and careful measures to free this ship,” said Administrator Matsuda.

Photo courtesy Titan

Titan Refloats the Monongahela

Leveraging the strength of Titan's 300-metric ton linear hydraulic pullers, Titan safely refloated the Monongahela, a decommissioned tanker ship on the James River in Virginia last week. The salvage team, led by Capt. Guy Wood, executed several test pulls on the tanker before last week's successful refloating to verify the holding power of the anchors being used and to help with the determination of refloating calculations. The three pullers were secured to the Monongahela's flight deck with 1…

Removal of Obsolete Ships from Suisun Bay

The federal government announced that it would remove the remaining 52 ships that are currently moored in the Suisun Bay as part of an agreement with environmental groups that was filed in federal court in Sacramento, Calif., the Department of Justice and Department of Transportation announced March 31. The Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration (MARAD) has already begun removing obsolete ships from Suisun Bay for recycling, including four ships that have been removed since November 2009 and a fifth that was removed March 31.