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Tuesday, March 26, 2019

International Transport Workers Federation News

Vivian Maia (Photo: OSM)

OSM CEO to Build Opportunities for Female Seafarers

In his first week in the new role of OSM Maritime CEO, Bjørn Tore Larsen has outlined his vision for greater female participation in the maritime industry, particularly with regards to vessel crews.Larsen, the founder and Chairman of the global ship management company, believes a healthier gender balance will help shipping in the quest for long-term success and commercial sustainability.OSM is a leader in the ship management segment, with over 500 vessels in the fleet, approximately 30 office locations and some 11,000 expert seafarers.

Pic: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

IMO Emphasizes Seafarer Training

The  International Maritime Organization (IMO) Secretary-General Kitack Lim has highlighted the need to consider seafarer training and standards as shipping evolves, with increasing levels of technology and automation.Speaking at IMO Headquarters (15 January) at the launch of a new report “Transport 2040: Automation, Technology and Employment - the Future of Work”, Secretary-General Lim set out key questions that will require focus from all stakeholders:  “How will the seafarer…

Image: International Transport Workers' Federation

ITF Warns on Tug Captains Fatigue at Panama

The International Transport Workers' Federation (ITF) warns that a major accident on the Panama Canal could be imminent, highlighting the serious health and safety concerns related to the fatigue of tugboat captains.The new report  takes the Panama Canal Authority (PCA) to task with tiredness, rather than the protocols in place for the physical transfer of vessels as was the case previously.Fatigue of Panama Canal tugboat poses a major threat to safety in the operation of the canal’s Neopanamax locks…

New Agreement on Minimum Wage for Seafarers

The social partners, namely the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) and the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS), convened in Geneva at the Joint Maritime Commission (JMC) subcommittee on seafarers wages to review the International Labor Organization (ILO) Minimum Wage for an Able Seafarer (AB) provided for in Code B of the Maritime Labor Convention, 2006 (as amended).The decision, following two days of negotiations, was to update the minimum wage for an able seafarer by $27 over the next three years.

Photo: ICS

New Guidelines on Welfare Aspects of the ILO MLC

The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) and the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) have jointly released new ‘Guidelines for implementing the Welfare aspects of the Maritime Labor Convention (MLC)’.Adopted by the International Labor Organization in 2006, the MLC aims to ensure comprehensive worldwide protection and enforcement of the rights of seafarers, and to establish a level playing field for ILO Member States and shipowners committed to providing decent…

Graph: Drewry Shipping Consultants Limited

Manning Costs in Shipping Rises: Drewry

Cost growth returned to seafaring in 2018 and is projected to accelerate moderately on recovering vessel earnings and continued shortfall in officer numbers, according to the latest Manning Annual Review and Forecast report published by global shipping consultancy Drewry. Manning costs have risen moderately in 2018 following several years of stagnation as a recovery in most cargo shipping markets has taken some pressure off vessel operators, enabling employers to lift wage levels, particularly amongst the market-related officer ranks.

(Photo: Wavelink)

Seafaring Cadets Upskilled the ‘Singapore Way’

In its 36th run, The CadetsPlus program has benefitted close to 3,000 cadets across 15 cities in six countries.A historical training collaboration between the Singapore Maritime Officers’ Union (SMOU), the Thai Seafarers’ Association (TSFA) and various shipping companies in Thailand, upskilled close to 90 Thai cadets who are ready to be deployed onboard Singapore’s shipping fleet having completed a two-week CadetsPlus pre-sea preparatory program developed by Singapore’s Wavelink Maritime Institute (WMI).In conjunction with SMOU’s first Bangkok Nite for its Thai union members…

Courtesy ITF

IBF secures the rights of dockers to do lashing

The International Transport Workers’ Federation's (ITF) expanded Fair Practices Committee Steering Group (FPC SG) met and approved the terms of the new International Bargaining Forum (IBF) on 23 February 2018 Agreement. In this it highlighted the new terms agreed in Article 4, Non-Seafarers Work or the “Dockers’ Clause”, as it is often referred to, as a significant development in securing work for dockers. The revised clause and the new implementation procedure clarifies the dockers’ right to carry out lashing and other cargo handling services in ports.

Photo:  International Maritime Organization (IMO)

Maritime Pilots Recognized with IMO Bravery Accolade

Two maritime pilots who defied fire to bring a burning ship to safety, averting a major maritime catastrophe, received the 2017 IMO Award for Exceptional Bravery at Sea during the 2017 IMO awards ceremony, held on Monday (27 November). Pilots Captain Michael G. McGee and Captain Michael C. Phillips, from Houston, United States, were recognized for their role in averting a major tragedy in September 2016. The ship they were piloting, the 247 meters-long tanker Aframax River, broke…

Image: © Binkski / Adobe Stock

Port Worker Crushed to Death in Jakarta

According to an announcement from the International Transport Workers’ Federation, an Indonesian worker who was killed on the job at the International Container Terminal Services Inc (ICTSI) facility in Jakarta overnight. According to the ITWF report, Local unions say the 40-year-old man was fatally crushed at 22.10 local time when a refrigerated container was dropped onto his truck, crushing the cabin and killing the driver, the second workplace fatality at the Port of Jakarta in three weeks.

Australia Bans Bulker for Underpaying Crew

A Panama flagged bulk carrier, DL Carnation, has been banned from entering Australian ports for a period of 12 months after authorities uncovered a scheme which saw the vessel’s crew being intentionally underpaid. The Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) said it received a complaint on Friday, September 8 via the International Transport Workers’ Federation alleging discrepancies in the payment of wages for the crew of the DL Carnation. An AMSA surveyor attended the vessel…

Graph: Drewry Shipping Consultants Limited

Shipping’s Recovery May Not Lift Seafarer Wage Costs

Despite a recovery in cargo shipping markets, ship manning costs will remain suppressed as shipowners and operators continue to be financially challenged and the officer shortfall recedes, according to the latest Manning report published by global shipping consultancy Drewry. The lack of confidence in the industry has seen wage increases almost at a standstill since 2009, and over the past year average officer rates have slid into reverse. While there remains an overall shortfall in officer numbers…

Martek Bucks the Trend on Gender Divide

Historically marine industries have been significantly male dominated but one business in Rotherham is bucking the trend. Martek Marine, who employ more than 60 staff, now boast a leadership team which is made up of 75% women. The business, which launched in 1999, serves 80 different countries and women currently make up 45% of their entire workforce. During 2016 both the BBC and BHP Billiton took steps to ensure that moving forward women make up 50% of their workforce. While…

Hanjin Containership Set to Dock in Vancouver

A container vessel that spent months sitting off Canada's west coast due to the collapse of a major South Korea shipping company is set to dock in Vancouver on Thursday, port and union officials said. The Hanjin Scarlet, with nearly 800 containers on board, has been sitting some 45 km (28 miles) outside of Prince Rupert for several months, said Peter Lahay, an inspector and coordinator with the International Transport Workers Federation. Emily Hamer, a spokeswoman at the Port of Vancouver, confirmed that the vessel would be arriving at the port.

Image: Panama Canal authority

Ship Hits Panama Canal

The Panama Canal authority  (ACP) says a Chinese container ship’s damaging scrape with the canal’s new wider locks was caused by bad weather, Reuter quotes  ACP's  administrator, Jorge Quijano. He said that the only problem in the last month involved a China Shipping Container Lines ship, the Xin Fei Zhou, and it was due to intense rainfall and wind and the vessel not lining up correctly. Quijano says it was the only such incident in the widened canal’s first month of operation. He says unfortunately these things happen in their business.

Dockers are under attack! Fight back by taking action on 7 July Photo ITF

7th July, Dockers to Take Action Globally

The International Dockworkers’ Council (IDC), International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) and European Transport Workers’ Federation (ETF) are calling on dockers’ unions around the world to organise an hour of activities on International dockers’ action day next Thursday, 7 July. The aim of the day is to raise awareness with the public about the vital contribution dockworkers make to the world economy, the risks they face at work every day and to highlight the growing attacks on working conditions in ports. A tribute to fallen and injured comrades will be included.

Image:  Brazil’s Fundação Homem de Mar (FHM)

Panama Canal Dismisses ITF Claims

The Panama Canal has dismisses claims by the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) that questions industry standards and the operation of the Expanded Panama Canal’s new locks. Claims made by ITF that new locks built for the Panama Canal expansion will be unsafe in operation have been strongly rejected by the Panama Canal Authority (ACP) as lacking scientific accuracy and credibility. Following the publication of an ITF-commissioned study, Peter Pusztai Panama, Canal Pilot Training Coordinator, said: “The ITF’s claims are unproven and contain many errors.

Kongsberg full mission engine room simulator, National University ‘Odessa Maritime Academy’ (Photo: ITF)

IMEC, ITF Invest $3 Mln in Ukraine Maritime Training

The International Maritime Employers’ Council (IMEC) and the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) have agreed to invest $3 million in Ukrainian marine training. The donation is being made from the Seafarers’ Employment Promotion Fund (SEPF), a unique training fund sourced from collective bargaining agreements negotiated by the two organizations. IMEC and the ITF work together as social partners to administer the SEPF. The funds will support the work of the Kherson State Maritime Academy (KSMA) and the National University ‘Odessa Maritime Academy’ (NU-OMA).

Photo:  International Chamber of Shipping

ILO Minimum Wage for Seafarers to Stay at $614

The recommended International Labour Organization (ILO) Minimum Wage for Able Seafarers will remain at its current level of US$ 614 basic pay per month until at least 2018. This follows an ILO Joint Maritime Commission (JMC) meeting held in Geneva last week, comprising representatives of maritime employers co-ordinated by the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) and seafarers’ unions co-ordinated by the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF). ICS, in its role as an official ILO social partner…

ILO Minimum Wage for Seafarers to Stay at $614

The recommended International Labor Organization (ILO) Minimum Wage for Able Seafarers will remain at its current level of $ 614 basic pay per month until at least 2018. This follows an ILO Joint Maritime Commission (JMC) meeting held in Geneva last week, comprising representatives of maritime employers co-ordinated by the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) and seafarers’ unions co-ordinated by the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF). ICS, in its role as an official ILO social partner…

Flag of Convenience Hearings Raise ‘Shocking Concerns’

The International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) maritime coordinator Jacqueline Smith today described the Australian senate hearings into flag of convenience (FOC) shipping taking place in Canberra as raising “shocking concerns”. According to the ITF, the fact that the captain of the ‘death ship’ Sage Sagittarius – on which three people have died in suspicious circumstances – was allowed to work off the Australian coast for eight months, despite claims of involvement in potential firearms offences, is the latest revelation to emerge at the hearings.

Photo courtesy of ICS

Shippers Urged to Use Transitional Measures for Ship Recycling

Shipping companies are being strongly encouraged to use new ‘Transitional Measures for Shipowners Selling Ships for Recycling’ launched by a coalition of international shipping industry organizations. The purpose of the new ‘Transitional Measures’ – developed by an inter-industry working group led by the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) – is to help shipowners ensure to the greatest extent possible that their end of life ships will be recycled at facilities that are compliant with the standards enshrined in the IMO Hong Kong Convention…

Seminar this time was held in Bangalore, India Photo Courtesy NUSI

Seafarers' Unions Hold International Cruise Seminar in India

NUSI alongwith Norwegian Seafarers Union (NSU), FIT-CISL and International Transport Workers Federation (ITF) together organized the Fifth International Cruise Seminar in India. This time the seminar was organized in Bangalore from January 19th -23rd, 2016. Around 75 seafarers from various cruise lines such as NCL, RCCL, Silverseas, P&O, Louis Cruise Lines and others participated in the seminar. The participants held all types of positions onboard, varying from Deck & Engine, HR and both higher and lower ranking positions in the Hotel/Catering Departments.

Maritime Piracy Program Moves to ISWAN

The boards of the International Seafarers Welfare and Assistance Network (ISWAN) and the Maritime Piracy Humanitarian Response Program (MPHRP) have informed about the moving of the activities of the MPHRP into ISWAN. A transfer agreement was signed by both parties on August 3, 2015. ISWAN will now be responsible for all the activities of the highly respected MPHRP. The move to ISWAN will enable the program to develop under the auspices of a well-established international seafarers’ welfare organization that is registered as a charity.

Drewry - total operating cost index (2000=100)(Photo: Drewry Maritime Research)

Ship Operating Costs to Rise Over Next Two Years

The cost of operating cargo ships is forecast to rise over the next two years after falling in 2015, according to the latest Ship Operating Costs Annual Review and Forecast 2015/16 report published by global shipping consultancy Drewry. The average decline in ship operating costs across the sectors covered in the report in 2015 was one percent, but for ships that are big consumers of lube oils, the decline in overall costs was closer to two percent. Weak freight markets have forced ship owners to trim costs…

Photo: Maritime Union of New Zealand

Maritime Worries Over Ship Inspections

The Maritime Union of New Zealand is concerned about the reduction in monitoring of international shipping by Maritime New Zealand, the Government agency responsible for ensuring a “safe, secure and clean” maritime environment. Less than half of “Priority 1” vessels (49%) coming into New Zealand were inspected in the 2014/2015 year, according to Maritime New Zealand’s annual report. That is well beneath the target of 70% inspections for the year, and the 82% of inspections achieved in the 2013/2014 year.