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Wednesday, August 21, 2019

Integrated Power System News

Photo courtesy of Rolls-Royce

Successful MTG Light Off for USS Zumwalt

The future USS Zumwalt, the first ship of the DDG 1000 multimission destroyer class, performed a successful Generator Light-Off of its first Main Turbine Generator Set (MTG) this week, Rolls-Royce announced. The ship is now power self-sufficient enabling follow-on systems testing and trials. Neil Pickard, Rolls-Royce, Program Executive said, “On behalf of the entire DDG 1000 program team, I am very pleased to confirm the successful Light-Off of the first Rolls-Royce MT30 Main Turbine Generator Set this week.

DDG 1000 Zumwalt-class Destroyer: Image credit USN

Zumwalt-Class Destroyer Capabilities

Capt. Jim Downey, DDG-1000 program manager at Naval Sea Systems Command, explains. DDG-1000 is a multi-mission destroyer. It covers surface, sub-surface, as well as air warfare areas. Its real focus is in the littorals, providing volume fire support in the littorals, as well as support to special operations areas. Volume fire support comes from significant gun systems on the ship to provide support right to ground forces and precise targets ashore to help the Navy and those ground forces in that type of combat area.

Maine shipyard workers guide one of four "Ultra Units" for DDG 1000, the lead ship of the Zumwalt-class of guided missile destroyers. Work on DDG 1000 is now over 50% complete.

$1.8B Contract for Two Zumwalt-class DDG-1000 Destroyers

The U. S. Navy has awarded General Dynamics Bath Iron Works, a subsidiary of General Dynamics (NYSE: GD), a $1.8 billion contract for the construction of DDG 1001 and DDG 1002, the next two ships in the Zumwalt-class program. DDG 1001 is scheduled to be delivered in December 2015 and DDG 1002 is scheduled to be delivered in February 2018. "This contract enables us to maintain a strong base of quality shipbuilding jobs in Maine and continue our contributions to sustaining the U.S. Navy fleet," said Jeff Geiger, president of Bath Iron Works.

BIW welder, Carl Pepin, second from left, with members of the Zumwalt family including Ann Phillips, left, James G. Zumwalt and Mouzetta Zumwalt-Weathers, at the keel laying for DDG-1000, the first ship in the planned three-ship Zumwalt class of guided-missile destroyers.

Bath Iron Works Lays Keel of DDG 1000

On November 17, 2011, General Dynamics Bath Iron Works celebrated the keel laying of Zumwalt (DDG 1000), the first ship in the planned three-ship Zumwalt class of guided-missile destroyers. The keel unit is the 4,000-ton, heavily outfitted mid-forebody section of the ship, which was moved from the shipyard’s Ultra Hall construction facility onto the building ways in late October. The ship is named for ADM Elmo Zumwalt (1920-2000), regarded as the father of the modern Navy. He…

Jonathan Graves (sitting, left) and John Fillmore (sitting, right) sign the delivery documents: Photo credit HII

Ingalls Delivers 'Zumwalt' Core-Composite Deckhouse Module

Huntington Ingalls Industries Shipbuilding delivers the 900-ton deckhouse structure to house the ship's bridge, radars, antennas & intake/exhaust systems. The deckhouse is designed to provide a significantly smaller radar cross-section than any other ship in today's fleet. Ingalls is building the composite deckhouse and hangar for the DDG 1000 class at the company's Composite Center of Excellence in Gulfport. Made almost exclusively using cored composite construction processes, the deckhouse and hangar take full advantage of the properties of carbon fiber materials and balsa wood cores.

DDG 1000 Zumwalt-class Destroyer: Image credit USN

Raytheon Zumwalt-class Destroyer Software Development Program

Raytheon Company deliver more than 6-million lines of software to the U.S. Navy for the DDG 1000 Zumwalt-class destroyer program. Part of the Total Ship Computing Environment (TSCE) -- the integrated mission system for the DDG 1000 class -- the software delivery supports ship activation and combat system testing, set to commence this year. The magnitude of this software development program is recognized as one of the most complex in the history of the U.S. Navy. TSCE continues to achieve all critical readiness milestones on schedule…

DDG 1000: Milestone at U.S. Navy Test SIte

Converteam in partnership with the U.S. Navy have successfully tested the DDG 1000’s high voltage Integrated Power System (IPS)(1) to full power at the Land Based Test Site located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. DDG 1000 is the first U.S. Navy surface combatant to leverage this technology—an all-electric architecture providing electric power for both propulsion and ship services. As the integrated power systems provider, Converteam is responsible for the entire program’s high voltage system design, commissioning and testing at the land based test site.

New Navy Contracts

DRS C3 System, Inc., Stevensville, Md., is being awarded a $7,935,427 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for research and development activities associated with integrated power system (IPS) advanced modules and IPS ship design tools. This effort supports the research and development of various alternative technologies associated with advanced power systems and development of ship design tools that support the design development of advanced IPS ship concepts and that quantifies technical risks associated with the integrated technology.