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Tuesday, November 19, 2019

Imo Maritime Safety Committee News

Australia, Japan Enact Rules for Shipping Liquid Hydrogen

Australia and Japan signed a memorandum at the headquarters of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) in Canberra which will allow liquid hydrogen to be shipped in bulk for the first time. Ship containment systems are being developed in Japan that will be capable of safely transporting liquid hydrogen in bulk from Australia to Japan as part of a pilot project scheduled to commence in 2020. Bulk gas cargoes are carried under the International Code for the Construction…

Photo Danish Maritime Authority

International Standards for Carriage of Offshore Technicians

On Friday, the IMO Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) took one important step forward in its work to develop international standards for the carriage of offshore technicians, for example in connection with activities within the field of offshore wind energy. More specifically, the Committee adopted interim recommendations on safe carriage of offshore technicians. In addition, the Committee agreed on a definition of these technicians – so-called industrial personnel – which inter alia covers wind turbine technicians.

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ClassNK Sets up Industry's first Digital Archive Center

ClassNK has established ClassNK Archive Center (NKAC), the maritime industry’s first onshore digital archive center that fully complies with IMO Goal-based ship construction standards (GBS) and the Industry Standard, which begin to apply from today. IMO GBS are broad, over-arching safety and environmental standards that ships are required to meet during their operational lifetime. The new SOLAS regulation II-1/3-10 made GBS applicable to bulk carriers and oil tankers of 150m in length and above for which the building contract is placed on or after 1 July 2016.

Photo: United Arab Shipping Company

UASC Fully Compliant VGM Lift Now

United Arab Shipping Company (UASC) announced today the conclusion of a 100% compliant Verified Gross Mass (VGM) lift of 159 UASC containers on board CSCL’s Saturn. This achievement comes ahead of the VGM requirement deadline of July 1st, 2016 making container weight verification a condition for vessel loading. The VGM requirement is an industry wide initiative that was kicked-started by the IMO Maritime Safety Committee’s recently approved changes to the SOLAS convention. UASC…

ClassNK Amends IGC Code Rules and Guidance

Classification society ClassNK has amended its Rules and Guidance for the Survey and Construction of Steel Ships in response to the latest industry developments, including amendments made to the International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk (IGC Code). IMO decided to carry out the first full review of the IGC Code to reflect the latest technological advancements and increasing ship size. Amendments to the Code were adopted as resolution MSC.370 (93) at the 93rd session of the IMO Maritime Safety Committee (MSC 93) held in May 2014.

Pic: IUMI

Industry Unprepared for New Container Weighing Rules, says IUMI

Helle Hammer, Managing Director Cefor & Chair of the International Union of Marine Insurance (IUMI) Political Forum discuss about Container Weighing Rules. As of 1 July 2016, only containers with a verified gross mass will be allowed to be loaded on board a vessel (although IMO is allowing a grace period of three months). Although the new SOLAS requirement was adopted in 2014, many shippers and forwarders are still unprepared, and masters will have little choice but to refuse unverified containers. In the short term, non-compliance is likely to affect the cargo insurance sector.

Image:  World Shipping Council

Container Weight Regulations

Starting July 1, 2016, the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) Maritime Safety Committee approved amendments to The International Convention for the Safety of Life at Seas’ (SOLAS), will require that shippers verify gross container weight prior to shipping. But now, according to a report in the WSJ, IMO says ‘practical and pragmatic’ three-month grace period would calm exporter fears of widespread backups. The top global shipping regulator, trying to quiet industry alarms over impending rules that exporters fear will trigger widespread backups at ports…

Image courtesy IMO

IMO to Prevent Cyber-attacks

At a meeting of the IMO's Maritime Safety Committee (MSC), it was recognised that ships may also be exposed to so-called cyber-attacks. Now, the IMO wants to prevent hostile attempts to interfere with electronic systems in the maritime industry and it has therefore drawn up interim Guidelines on risk management. An important point of the guidelines is that potential attacks will not be aimed merely at traditional computer systems, but will also to a high degree focus on control and steering systems for, for example, navigation, machinery, communication, etc.

Photo:  Cox & Kings

Turkmenistan to Roll out International Transit Transport Corridors

AzerNews says that Turkmenistan publicized its plans on creating international transit transport corridors within the framework of the 96th meeting of the International Maritime Organization's (IMO) Maritime Safety Committee, ongoing from May 11 to 20, 2016. The heads of the railway and maritime agencies of Turkmenistan, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Iran and Georgia recently held a five-sided meeting at the National Tourist Zone "Avaza" on the Caspian Sea coast. The meeting was also attended by representatives of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Turkmenistan.

Amendments to the IMSBC Code schedules. Table: North of England P&I Club

New cargoes added to the IMSBC Code

In June 2015 the IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee adopted Resolution MSC.393(95) and amendments to the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code. Administrations may choose to apply the amendments on a voluntary basis from 1 January 2016. However, the amendments will only become mandatory from 1 January 2017. A brief summary of the major changes to the Code can be found here. The cargo entry of “Wood Pellets” is deleted from this Amendment. 1. Bulk Cargo Shipping Names (BCSN) has been listed in three languages (English, Spanish and French).

Emblem: Russian Maritime Register of Shipping

New amendments to the IMDG Code become mandatory

Russian Maritime Register of Shipping (RS) brings to notice that the new amendments to the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code will become mandatory on 1 January 2016. The amendments to the IMDG Code contained in Resolution MSC.372(93) Amendments were adopted in May 2014, at IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee 93-rd session, as RS timely informed all the interested parties. The Resolution introduced into the code the Rules 1 and 2 Appendix I to the International CSC Convention concerning the labelling upon safety, maintenance and inspection conditions approval.

The IGF Code, which will become mandatory under amendments to SOLAS, aims to minimize the risk to the ship, its crew and the environment, having regard to the nature of the fuels involved. (Photo:: FJORD LINE ESPEN GEES)

IMO Adopts Gas and Low-flashpoint Fuels Code

The new mandatory code for ships fuelled by gases or other low-flashpoint fuels was adopted by IMO's Maritime Safety Committee (MSC), when it met at the Organization's London headquarters for its 95th session from June 3-12, 2015. The Committee also placed unsafe mixed migration by sea on its agenda and considered cyber security matters and passenger ship safety. It adopted new ships’ routing measures and approved a number of circulars arising from items put forward by the subcommittees.

The Australian Maritime Safety Authority’s (AMSA) Navigation Safety and International Relations General Manager Brad Groves

AMSA GM Elected Chairman of IMO's Safety Committee

The Australian Maritime Safety Authority’s (AMSA) Navigation Safety and International Relations General Manager Brad Groves has been elected as Chairman of the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) Maritime Safety Committee for 2016. The election was conducted on 11 June, 2015 during the 95th session of MSC at the IMO’s headquarters in London. The Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) is the International Maritime Organisation’s (IMO) senior technical body on safety-related matters, and the appointment is a major achievement in the maritime industry.

Image: ICS

ICS Publishes Annual Review

The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) has published its Annual Review of maritime policy developments in advance of its Annual General Meeting and to coincide with this week’s meeting of the IMO Maritime Safety Committee. Key issues covered in this year’s ICS Annual Review include the impact of the rescue at sea crisis in the Mediterranean on the shipping industry; the status of IMO environmental regulations on low sulphur fuel and ballast water management; the shipping industry’s efforts to deliver further CO2 emissions reductions…

IMSO Starts the Evaluation of Iridium

On February 4, 2014, the IMSO Director General launched an Consultancy Program inviting appropriate experts to assist in the evaluation of mobile satellite communications systems for the GMDSS. The IMO Maritime Safety Committee, at its 94th session in November 2014, agreed that IMSO should undertake the technical and operational evaluation of the Iridium mobile satellite system to assess compliance with the relevant criteria for recognition as GMDSS satellite provider, noting that IMSO would convene a Group of Experts from the abovementioned Consultancy Program.

Containers to be wieghed before transport by ship

Containers Must be Weighed Before Shipping

United Nations’ International Maritime Organization (IMO) has decided to make it mandatory to weigh loaded containers before they are transported by sea. This will enhance safety and prevent pollution of the marine environment. In the future, loaded containers must not be taken on board a ship until their weight has been determined. This was decided by the IMO Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) at last week’s meeting. The correct weight – the so-called verified weight – can be determined in two ways.

MSC Approves SOLAS Amendments

The International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) Maritime Safety Committee (MSC), which met at the Organization's London headquarters for its 94th session, from November 17-21, 2014, approved draft SOLAS amendments to make mandatory the International Code of Safety for Ships using Gases or other Low- flashpoint Fuels (IGF Code); adopted other SOLAS amendments; continued its work on its action plan on passenger ship safety; and approved and adopted a number of items put forward by the subcommittees.

IMO adopts a new set of regulations on navigation in polar waters now in force

IMO Steps Up Safety in Polar Waters

United Nations’ International Maritime Organization (IMO) has adopted global, binding regulations to enhance safety of navigation in polar waters. After several years’ intense negotiations, the IMO Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) has today adopted a new set of regulations on navigation in polar waters, including the waters around Greenland. The IMO hereby takes a great step towards making the Polar Code in its entirety internationally binding. The Polar Code covers all aspects of navigation in polar areas – from the construction of ships…

Photo: IMO

MEPC Approves Draft Polar Code

A key step on the way to a mandatory Polar Code for ships operating in Arctic and Antarctic waters has been reached with the approval by the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) of the environmental provisions in the draft International Code for Ships Operating in Polar Waters (the Polar Code), together with associated draft amendments to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL), to make the Code mandatory.

Britannia Seaways

Danish DFDS Crew Receives IMO Bravery Award

The crew of the DFDS ship Britannia Seaways receives the award for the courage displayed in a vehement fire on board in 2013. On Thursday, the IMO Council agreed to present the internal Award for Exceptional Bravery at Sea to the Captain and crew on board the DFDS ship Britannia Seaways. Thus, the IMO Council agreed with the decision of the Assessment Panel to present the award to the Danish crew. The award is awarded by United Nations’ International Maritime Organization (IMO).

File photo

Container Weighing a Task for Shippers Not Terminals: ESPO

European Sea Ports Organisation (ESPO) says it welcomes the recent decision of IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) that containers must be weighed before being stowed on board ship; however it  stresses that the weighing of containers should not burden port handling activities. ESPO explains that the verification of a containers’ weight can indeed play an important role in enhancing safety in maritime transport and the whole transport chain. Ports confirm that misdeclarations of container weight do occur and cause safety risks.

Milestone for Enhanced Safety in Arctic Regions

United Nations’ International Maritime Organization (IMO) has just approved global binding regulations intending to enhance safety of navigation in polar areas. This means, inter alia, new requirements for passenger ships. Following several years of intense negotiations, the IMO Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) has today approved a new set of regulations on navigation in Arctic waters. Thus, the IMO has today taken a decisive step towards making the so-called Polar Code internationally binding.

Arctic Navigation: Image DMA

IMO Approve New Safety Regulations for Polar Navigation

The Danish Maritime Authority (DMA) informs that the United Nations’ International Maritime Organization (IMO) has approved global binding regulations intending to enhance safety of navigation in polar areas. This means, inter alia, new requirements for passenger ships. The IMO Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) has approved a new set of regulations on navigation in Arctic waters. Thus, the IMO has today taken a decisive step towards making the so-called Polar Code internationally binding.

Goal-Based Standards Verification Process Underway

IMO audit teams will shortly be established to verify construction rules for bulk carriers and oil tankers of classification societies which act as recognized organizations (ROs), following the receipt of requests for verification by the December 31, 2013 deadline. A new SOLAS regulation II-1/3-10 on Goal-based ship construction standards (GBS) for bulk carriers and oil tankers was adopted by IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee (MSC), at its eighty-seventh session in May 2010, by resolution MSC.290(87).

Jeff Lantz

SNAME to Host Energy Efficiency Workshop

The Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME) will host a workshop on Marine Energy Efficiency for ships, tugs, ferries and OSVs at the Maritime Institute of Technology and Graduate Studies (MITAGS) in Linthicum Heights, Maryland, March 11-12. With a focus on the theoretical and practical aspects of reducing vessel fuel consumption, the two-day workshop will feature technical discussions from a Webb Institute Professor of Ship Design and a representative of the Danish Shipowners Association…

Bulk carrier file photo CCL

Alert: New Iron Ore Cargo Shipment Rules Introduced Early in Brazil, Australia

Mutual insurers Steamship Insurance Management advises that a new iron ore fines (IOF) Schedule to the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code governing the carriage of IOF by sea, and an amended iron ore Schedule, are being given early effect in loading ports both in Australia and Brazil. A new iron ore fines (IOF) Schedule to the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code governing the carriage of IOF by sea, and an amended iron ore Schedule, were agreed at the IMO DSC 18 meeting in September 2013…