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Tuesday, January 19, 2021

Highsulphur Fuel Oil News

Source: BIMCO, Clarksons

BIMCO Tanker Rate Analysis: Reality Kicks In, Rates Fall

Tanker shipping: sky high freight rates replaced by reality of falling global oil demandGeopolitical tensions have now eased, leaving freight rates to feel the full effects of the weak underlying market and falling demand. Tanker shipping looks set to be under pressure for the rest of the year.Demand drivers and freight ratesThe tanker shipping industry was once again caught in a whirlwind, as freight rates skyrocketed with little regard to the poor market fundamentals before the latter once again caught up with rates.

© Igor Yu. Groshev / Adobe Stock

Low-sulphur Fuel Oil Prices Drop

Prices for very low sulphur fuel oil (VLSFO) in ports around the world have fallen within the first month since the International Maritime Organization's (IMO) new regulation for a 0.50% global sulphur cap for marine fuels has taken effect.Singapore has seen one of the largest drops in the price of VLSFO, which peaked on January 7, 2020 at $740 per metric ton (MT) and dropped $99 to $641 per MT on January 22, BIMCO points out.Prices rose in December as shipowners transitioned…

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Low-sulphur Fuel Sales Surge

The final quarter of 2019 marked a massive decline of high-sulphur fuel oil (HSFO) sales, as the industry transitioned into compliance of the International Maritime Organization's (IMO) 2020 Sulphur Cap (IMO 2020). In Singapore, the world’s largest bunkering hub, the bunker sale landscape saw significant change as the sale of high-sulphur fuel oil dropped tremendously in a matter of months. In contrast, the sale of low-sulphur fuels skyrocketed in the final quarter.The first wave…

AdobeStock / © 14KT Gold

Fuel Market Calm ahead of IMO Changeover

Fears about a shortage of diesel and other middle distillates stemming from new marine pollution regulations have receded, with distillate premiums falling to some of the lowest levels for two years.From the start of 2020, ocean-going ships will be required to use low-sulphur fuels or employ exhaust gas cleaning systems, known has scrubbers, under pollution control rules approved by the International Maritime Organization (IMO).Fuel traders and shipowners have warned for several…

Richard Greiner (Photo: BDO)

Shipping Confidence Dips as Trade War Worries Weigh

Confidence in the shipping industry fell in the past three months to its lowest level for two and half years, according to the latest Shipping Confidence Survey from leading shipping adviser and accountant BDO. Yet owners, charterers and managers were more confident than they were at the time of the previous survey in May 2019.The average confidence level recorded by the survey in the three months to end-August 2019 was 5.8 out of a possible maximum of 10.0. This compares to the…

Image Credit: AdobeStock/ © 14KTGold

Singapore's Ocean Tankers tests IMO-2020 Compliant Fuel

Off the coast of Singapore, the world's largest ship refuelling centre, a bunker barge sidled next to the supertanker Pu Tuo San to fill the giant vessel with a new type of fuel that will meet global standards that start up in January.With a little over five months left until stricter marine fuel rules come into effect, shippers such as Singapore's Ocean Tankers that own the very large crude carrier (VLCC) Pu Tuo San have started testing out lower sulphur fuel to prepare their…

File Image: AdobeStock / © Seafarer81

War Risk Costs Impact UAE Bunkers, Singapore benefits

Shippers trying to minimise time in the Middle East after oil tanker attacks pushed up insurance costs are scaling back purchases of marine fuels from the United Arab Emirates' (UAE) Fujairah oil hub, trade sources said.Instead, they are turning primarily to Singapore, the world's top refuelling hub, to buy marine fuels, also known as bunkers, with some diverting to smaller bunkering ports, including in India and Sri Lanka, the sources said.A tonne of 380-centistoke (cst) high…

© stockphoto mania/AdobeStock

Ship Fuel: Singapore Bunker Volumes Dip, 2019 Uncertain

Sales of marine fuels in Singapore, the world's biggest ship fueling port by volume, totaled 49.8 million tonnes in 2018, down 2 percentfrom a record the year before, the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) said on Monday.December sales volumes of marine fuels, also known as bunkers, reached an 11-month high of 4.308 million tonnes, up 10 percent from November and the second-highest for the year, the data showed.The strong month helped lift Singapore's 2018 marine fuel sales figures to the second highest on record…

Moore Stephens: Shipping Confidence Dips

Shipping confidence dipped slightly in the three months to end-November 2018, according to the latest Confidence Survey from international accountant and shipping adviser Moore Stephens.The average confidence level expressed by respondents fell to 6.0 out of a maximum  score of 10.0, compared to the 6.3 recorded in August 2018.Confidence on the part of all main categories of respondent was down, with the exception of brokers, where the rating increased from 4.9 to 5.2. Owners’ confidence fell to 6.4 from 6.8…

File Image / CREDIT AdobeStock / © Seafarer81

Singapore Marine Fuel Sales at 5-month High

Singapore marine fuel sales in October climbed 3 percent on year to a five-month high of 4.125 million tonnes, according to data released by the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) on Tuesday.The latest sales volumes were 0.3 percent higher compared to September, it showed. The higher October sales volumes reflect a slight increase in the number of ships coming to Singapore for refuelling, or bunkering, amid buoyant freight trade and easing concerns of contaminated fuels…

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How Refiners Plan to Grapple With Fuel Oil Output After 2020

High-sulphur fuel oil (HSFO), essentially the leftovers of an oil refiner's output, will still flow from refineries around the world even after new rules start up in 2020 curtailing its use in the global shipping fleet, a Reuters survey showed.Sixty percent of the 33 refineries contacted by Reuters in a global survey will still produce HSFO in 2020 although the supply will tighten as 70 percent of these refiners plan to reduce their output.Starting that year, ships will have to use marine fuel…

El Coquí, one of the world’s first ConRos powered by LNG (Photo: Crowley)

New Fuel Rules Push Shipowners to Go Green with LNG

Tough new rules on marine fuel are forcing shipowners to explore liquefied natural gas as a cleaner alternative and ports such as Gibraltar are preparing to offer upgraded refueling facilities in the shipping industry's biggest shake-up in decades.From 2020, International Maritime Organization rules will ban ships from using fuels with a sulphur content above 0.5 percent, compared with 3.5 percent now, unless they are equipped to clean up sulphur emissions. This will be enforced…

© Stockninja / Adobe Stock

More Ships Adding Scrubbers ahead of 2020

An increase in the number of ships adding cleaning systems to their smokestacks will mean vessels will continue to burn a sizable amount of fuel oil once new sulphur regulations for the fuel go into effect, Vienna-based consultancy JBC Energy said on Tuesday.Ships installed with exhaust gas cleaning systems, known as scrubbers, are expected to burn 600,000 barrels per day (bpd) of high-sulphur fuel oil (HSFO) in 2020 when the new rules from the International Maritime Organization (IMO) start…

Oil Markets Adjust to Japan’s Disaster

Singapore, 16 March  — The 11 March earthquake and tsunami in Japan, and the continuing nuclear crisis that they triggered, will have significant repercussions in global energy markets, according to international energy price reporting agency Argus. Japan will rely more on oil for power generation at least until the end of this year, altering regional balances for some grades of crude and providing a large boost in demand for low-sulphur fuel oil (LSFO). And it will seek additional LNG supplies.

Air Emissions Regs Under OMB Review

The draft final rule of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for control of air emissions from new marine compression-ignition engines at or above 30 liters per cylinder is under review by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The proposed rule was published in the Federal Register on August 28, 2009. While the proposal largely followed the IMO standards for emission control areas (ECAs), it was somewhat controversial because it proposed banning the sale of high-sulphur fuel oil in the United States, even to ships with technology to scrub the emissions.