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Sunday, July 12, 2020

Guy Platten News

Governments Pledge Crew Change Action

A dozen countries have have committed to facilitate crew changes and achieve key worker designation for seafarers, following a virtual ministerial summit hosted by the U.K. government on Thursday, marking progress to help resolve a growing crisis facing the maritime industry, and enable hundreds of thousands of stranded seafarers to go home or join ships.“The inability of ship operators worldwide to conduct ship’s crew changes is the single most pressing maritime operational challenge to the safe and efficient movement of global trade…

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UK Plans Summit to Address Crew Change Crisis

The U.K. government announced Thursday it will host an international summit next month to address crew change challenges caused by the COVID-19 health crisis.Led by U.K. Maritime Minister Kelly Tolhurst, the virtual event will bring together UN, political and business leaders from across the globe to reflect on the impact of the pandemic on the global shipping industry, and what governments and industry must do to protect the welfare of crew workers around the world. Secretary…

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Weary Sailors Pose Risk to World Merchant Fleet -Kitack Lim

Hundreds of thousands of weary seafarers stuck on ships for many months and unable to go home due to the coronavirus pose a risk to the safe operation of the world’s merchant fleet, the UN’s shipping chief said on Tuesday.About 90% of world trade is transported by sea and continued complications with changing over ship crews due to restrictions in some jurisdictions is still affecting supply chains despite an easing of lockdown in many parts of the world.Kitack Lim, Secretary-General of the UN’s International Maritime Organization…

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IMO Endorses Shipping Industry's 12-step Plan for Crew Changes

The need for ships to change crews and for the world's 1.2 million seafarers to be able to fly home at the end of their periods of service have emerged as two of the biggest challenges facing the shipping industry as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.To help governments put in place coordinated procedures to facilitate the safe movement of seafarers, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) issued a 12-step plan to 174 member states, providing them with a roadmap to free…

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ICS Issues Guidance on Managing Ship and Seafarer Certificates Amid COVID-19

The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) has issued new guidance to support the shipping industry in its essential role of ensuring essential goods and commodities, such as energy, food and medical supplies, can be carried to the world during the coronavirus pandemic.The guidance, available on the ICS website, provides information for shipowners and operators on managing ship and seafarer certificates required by international regulations. It also highlights the unique compliance…

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Shipping Industry Urges Free Movement of Crews to Keep Trade Moving

Ships must be allowed to change over overworked and exhausted crews to help to keep trade flowing as coronavirus lockdowns shut many transit points across the globe, shipping industry officials said on Tuesday.About 90% of world trade is transported by sea but a deepening lockdown in many countries and suspended air travel have disrupted supply chains, especially for ship owners who rely on the free movement of crews to keep ships moving.The International Chamber of Shipping association (ICS)…

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Shipping Industry Urges G20 to Keep Freight Flowing

Ships and their crews must be able to trade freely with minimal port restrictions to ensure supply lines don't freeze up while the coronavirus shuts down much of the globe, shipping and port officials said on Tuesday.After draconian steps to stop the spread of the virus, China's economy is slowly coming back online but logistics chains are backing up in other parts of the world.This has been compounded by ships being quarantined for up to two weeks and seafarers held up as countries impose lockdowns to stop the spread of the virus.The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) association…

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Intermodal Supply Chains Strain Under the Weight of Coronovirus Lockdowns

LONDON/MADRID/LOS ANGELES, March 23 - Freight carriers are struggling to deliver goods by land, sea or air as the coronavirus pandemic forces Western governments to impose lockdowns, threatening supplies of vital products including medicines into the most affected areas, such as Italy.While China's draconian steps to stop the spread of the virus are now allowing its economy slowly to come back online, supply chains are backing up in other parts of the world.Problems ranging from…

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Western Supply Chains Buckle as Coronavirus Lockdowns Spread

Freight carriers are struggling to deliver goods by land, sea or air as the coronavirus pandemic forces Western governments to impose lockdowns, threatening supplies of vital products including medicines into the most affected areas, such as Italy.While China's draconian steps to stop the spread of the virus are now allowing its economy slowly to come back online, supply chains are backing up in other parts of the world.Problems ranging from finding enough truck drivers to restrictions on seafarers and a lack of air freight are hitting the smooth flow of goods…

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ICS Issues Coronavirus Guidance

The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) has issued new guidance for the global shipping industry to help combat the spread of the Coronavirus (COVID-19). The comprehensive 22-page document has been produced in collaboration with prominent international bodies including:•    The World Health Organization (WHO)•    The International Maritime Organization (IMO)•    The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC)•    The International Maritime Health Association…

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Shipping Industry Faces $370 mln Hit From New Panama Canal Charge

A new "freshwater" charge that came in this month to help the Panama Canal cope with climate change will cost the shipping industry up to $370 million a year, marking another blow for maritime companies already hit by fallout from the coronavirus.The Panama Canal, one of world's busiest shipping routes, which handled nearly 14,000 transits last year, said last month it would introduce a charge from Feb. 15 of $10,000 for any vessel more than 125 feet long.The canal, which relies on water from nearby Gatun Lake, has been hit by drought which affects water levels in the chokepoint.

Image: Panama Canal Authority.

Ships to Face 30% Higher Costs at Panama

The Panama Canal will begin collecting a freshwater surcharge from ships using the waterway from 15th February, as part of actions to address a scarcity of rainfall after the surrounding area recorded its fifth driest year of the last seven decades in 2019.The charge will be set at $10,000 for any vessel over 125 feet long. There will also be a variable surcharge based on the level of the Gatun Lake at the time of transit.The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) calculate this move will increase costs to ships passing through the Panama Canal by up to 15%.

Image: International Chamber of Shipping

Ship Industry Proposes $5B R&D Fund to Cut Emission

Shipping associations have proposed creating a research fund with $5 billion raised by the industry to develop technology to help the sector meet U.N. targets on cutting emissions."The global maritime transport industry has submitted a proposal to form the world’s first collaborative shipping R&D program to help eliminate CO2 emissions from international shipping," said a press note from International Chamber of Shipping (ICS).The proposal include a new non-governmental Research & Development organisation to pave the way for decarbonization of shipping.

A large bulker awats cargo at an African port (Credit: Joe Keefe)

Tramp Shippers Challenged by IMO 2020

Shipping companies running itinerant merchant vessels known as tramps are concerned about sourcing fuel to comply with one of the biggest ever shake-ups of the industry next year, the head of the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) said.The International Maritime Organization (IMO) has banned the use of fuel with a sulphur content exceeding 0.5% from the beginning of January 2020, down from a maximum of 3.5% now, unless it is to power a ship equipped with a "scrubber" to clean the pollutant from exhaust emissions."We believe the (fuel) supplies will inevitably be patchy outside the main bu

Pics: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

Do Ports Need Global Regulation?

Ports are essential for the global supply chain - but do they need more international regulation?High-level speakers engaged in a lively debate at a joint Hutchison Ports, International Maritime Organization (IMO) and IMO International Maritime Law Institute (IMLI) seminar (9 September), to address the question: "Do ports need international regulation?"IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim reminded the audience that the IMO Convention does give the Organization a mandate to regulate…

Interferry CEO Mike Corrigan explains why the global trade association is poised to take its work to the next level.

Interferry Charts a Course for Growth

Interferry CEO Mike Corrigan explains why the global trade association is poised to take its work to the next level.While I respect the mantra of cautious optimism, I can’t help feeling genuinely excited that 2019 could prove to be a milestone year in the continuing growth of Interferry’s influence as the global voice of the ferry industry. We’ve come a long way since our US origins in 1976 as what was essentially a networking movement, but developments in recent months already suggest we are on course for yet more enhancement of our present-day worldwide networking and lobbying relationships.

Guy Platten, Secretary General. Photo: International Chamber of Shipping

ICS Concern Over Strait of Hormuz Crisis

The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) is receiving reports that a British registered vessel - Stena Impero - has been diverted from its original course in the Strait of Hormuz while sailing in international waters.Guy Platten, Secretary General of the International Chamber of Shipping said: “We are extremely concerned about this latest development in the Strait of Hormuz, particularly in respect of the safety of seafarers. We call on all authorities to work together to seek…

Pic: International Chamber of Shipping

6 Months' Countdown to Global Sulfur Cap

The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) has issued updated guidance to help shipowners comply with new UN International Maritime Organization (IMO) regulations, with just six months to go until the implementation of the ‘Global Sulphur Cap’ICS said that taking full effect on 1 January 2020 the legal framework will require merchant ships worldwide to use fuel with a sulphur content of less than 0.50 percent or use alternative mitigation technologies.“These new regulations are good for human health and good for the environment.

Pic: International Chamber of Shipping (ICS)

Shipping to Halve Carbon Footprint by 2050

The world's principal shipping organisation, representing around 80% of the world’s merchant tonnage, International Chamber of Shipping (ICS)  remains confident that shipping will improve its carbon efficiency by at least 40% by 2030 compared to 2008, in line with the UN International Maritime Organization (IMO) targets to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This follows important decisions made by the IMO Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 74) which met in London this week…

Pic: International Chamber of Shipping

Industry Calls for Block Exemption Regulation Extension

Four trade associations representing the international liner shipping industry submitted comments to the European Commission supporting extension of the EU consortia block exemption regulation (BER) for an additional five years beyond its current 2020 expiration date.The papers were submitted in the public consultation being held by the Commission’s Directorate-General for Competition (DG COMP) by the World Shipping Council (WSC), the European Community Shipowners’ Associations (ECSA), the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS), and the Asian Shipowners’ Association (ASA).

Photo: ICS

New Guidelines on Welfare Aspects of the ILO MLC

The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) and the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) have jointly released new ‘Guidelines for implementing the Welfare aspects of the Maritime Labor Convention (MLC)’.Adopted by the International Labor Organization in 2006, the MLC aims to ensure comprehensive worldwide protection and enforcement of the rights of seafarers, and to establish a level playing field for ILO Member States and shipowners committed to providing decent…

Bob Sanguinetti  Photo: UK Chamber of Shipping

Bob Sanguinetti New CEO of the UK Chamber of Shipping

Bob Sanguinetti has been appointed as the Chief Executive of the UK Chamber of Shipping. Sanguinetti was recently CEO of the Gibraltar Port Authority, where he was credited with delivering significant growth in vessel traffic following a series of wide-reaching initiatives. Previously he served as Commodore in the Royal Navy. Sanguinetti said: “I am delighted to be appointed to this prestigious role at a time when shipping is so central to the political agenda. The UK Chamber team deserve great credit for their work in recent years…

Guy Platten. Photo: Official Twitter Page of ICS

Guy Platten New Secretary-General of ICS

The Board of the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) announced the appointment of Guy Platten to the role of Secretary General, after almost five years in the UK Chamber of Shipping. "Following an extensive and rigorous selection procedure, the Board of ICS is delighted to announce the appointment of Guy Platten to the role of Secretary General," said a press release. Esben Poulsson, ICS Chairman said: “This proved a difficult decision for us, as we interviewed several strong candidates. However, the decision to appoint Guy was taken unanimously by the Board.

Nusrat Ghani (Photo: Maritime UK)

Women in Maritime: New UK Taskforce Established

Setting out to increase fairness, equality and inclusion within the maritime sector, Maritime UK has established a Women in Maritime Taskforce, a move welcomed by the U.K.’s new Maritime Minister, Nusrat Ghani MP. “I am delighted to see Maritime UK taking action to attract more women into our maritime industries, and I welcome this taskforce as an important first step,” said Ghani, who is only the second woman to hold the Department for Transport portfolio for the U.K.’s £40 billion maritime sector.

Photo: UK Chamber of Shipping

UK Chamber CEO Hails Shipping's Role in Globalisation

Capitalism, globalisation and international collaboration spread prosperity and growth - and shipping has a vital role to play in this process, Guy Platten, CEO,  UK Chamber of Shipping said in his address to the annual Scottish Shipping Benevolent Association (SSBA) dinner in Glasgow last night. A press release from UK Chamber quoted Guy Platten as saying: "Even though the world has never traded more, it seems like once again we have to defend trade, free markets and capitalism itself from those who would seek to tear them down," the UK Chamber CEO said.

Pic: UK Chamber of Shipping

UK Chamber of Shipping Warns EU Ports on Brexit

The EU is ignoring the risk of Brexit to European ports, the UK Chamber of Shipping has said. Hard border controls will lead to increased bureaucracy and will threaten prosperity. The Chamber warns that the return of border controls would lead to increased bureaucracy, “guaranteed” lorry gridlock and threats to the prosperity of both EU member states and the UK. It also says that the dangers to major EU ports has been understated. Chief executive of the Chamber, Guy Platten said: “The EU sells £240bn of goods to the UK each year, most of which travels through ports.