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Monday, October 26, 2020

Cruise Lines International Association News

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Cruises from US Ports Suspended Through Mid-September

A number of ocean-going cruise lines said they will voluntarily suspend cruise operations from U.S. ports until September 15 due to COVID-19, industry body Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) announced Friday.The extended operational pause goes well beyond the current no sail order issued by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) set to expire on July 24.“Although we had hoped that cruise activity could resume as soon as possible after that date, it is increasingly clear that more time will be needed to resolve barriers to resumption in the United States…

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US CDC Extends 'No Sail Order' for All Cruise Ships

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention extended its “no sail order” for all cruise ships, as it looks to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus pandemic.The new CDC order says that cruise ships have to cease operations for up to 100 days, or the expiration of the Secretary of Health and Human Services' declaration that COVID-19 constitutes a public health emergency, or if the CDC Director rescinds or modifies the order.The order, dated April 9, comes as the cruise industry takes a hit from the novel coronavirus outbreak…

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USCG Advises on Minimizing Novel Coronavirus at Sea

The Coast Guard Assistant Commandant for Prevention Policy has published an update March 16, 2020 to MSIB: Novel Coronavirus – Update (Change 2)An outbreak of respiratory illness caused by a novel coronavirus (COVID-19) may affect mariners and maritime commerce. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has updated their Interim Guidance for Ships on Managing Suspected Coronavirus Disease 2019 (see https://go.usa.gov/xdfyG) and Cruise Ship Travel (see https://go.usa.gov/xdfVP).Illness…

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CLIA: Any Action to Limit Cruising is Unwarranted

A cruise industry trade association has hit back at reports speculating that the U.S. government may move to discourage some travelers from taking cruises as part of a broader Trump administration effort to limit the spread of coronavirus."Any action to restrict cruising is unwarranted, and at odds with the World Health Organization which 'continues to advise against the application of travel or trade restrictions to countries experiencing COVID-19 outbreaks'," the Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) said in a statement on Friday.U.S.

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US Considers Discouraging Cruise Travel

The United States is considering ways to discourage U.S. travelers from taking cruises as part of a broader Trump administration effort to limit the spread of coronavirus, according to four officials familiar with the situation.The officials, who asked to remain anonymous, said no decision had been made. The discussions were taking place ahead of a meeting this weekend between Vice President Mike Pence, who is in charge of leading the U.S. response to the coronavirus, and the cruise industry.The administration could advise some or all U.S.

Adam Goldstein (Photo: Royal Caribbean Cruises)

Adam Goldstein Leaves Royal Caribbean

Longtime cruise industry executive Adam Goldstein has left Royal Caribbean Cruises after more than 30 years with the company.Goldstein was most recenlty Vice Chairman of RCL from 2018. From 2014 to 2018, he served as President & COO and from 2007 to 2014, he was President & CEO of the Royal Caribbean International brand. Goldstein has been with RCL since 1988.Goldstein will continue to serve as Chair of the trade group Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA).

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France's Cannes to Ban Polluting Cruise Ships

Mediterranean resort town Cannes, France's fourth-biggest cruise ship port, will ban the most polluting cruise ships from next year in a bid to boost air quality in the city.The ban will target ships that do not respect a 0.1% cap on sulphur in their fuel and could stop some passengers from disembarking in the city famous for its film festival."It's not about being against cruise ships. It's about being against pollution," Cannes Mayor David Lisnard told Reuters Television in an interview.Under the European Union's clean air policy…

Image: CLIA

Cruise Lines Invests $22 Bln in Clean Fuel Tech

Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) said that its Cruise Lines have invested more than $22 billion in ships with new, energy-efficient technologies and cleaner fuels and achieved substantial progress.“While cruise ships comprise far less than 1% of the global maritime community, cruise lines are at the forefront in developing responsible tourism practices and innovative technologies. Our industry leads in environmental stewardship,” said Michael Thamm, Chairman of CLIA…

Graphics: Cruise Lines International Association

CLIA: 28.5 Million Cruised in 2018

The global cruise passenger continues at a paced growth around the world with an almost seven percent increase from 2017 to 2018, totaling 28.5 million passengers.According to Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA)'s latest global cruise passenger statistics, the average age for a cruise passenger is 47 years.Research also shows North American travelers continue to embrace cruising with an annual passenger increase of nine percent (14.2 million passengers) in 2018.While the cruise sector represents two percent of the overall global travel industry…

Adam Goldstein (Photo: CLIA)

Global Cruise Industry Out in Front on Sustainability

The Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) has underscored the global cruise industry’s commitment to sustainability work in keynote speeches delivered by CLIA Chair Adam Goldstein to The Economist’s 2019 World Ocean Summit in Abu Dhabi, and in Berlin at ITB, a leading travel trade show.In his remarks, Goldstein highlighted the importance marrying growth opportunities with sustainability: “The water around and below us, the air above us, the communities around us, the people who work for us…

Edie Rodriguez, Ponant

Cruising: Small is Beautiful

Cruise shipping, at the intersection of maritime and hospitality industries, continues to be vibrant. The Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA), the industry’s major trade association, forecasts that the ocean cruise segment will draw 30 million passengers in 2019, up from 28.2 million in 2018. At the start of the decade, in 2010, the comparable count was 19.1 million passengers. CLIA members will have 272 vessels operating in 2019- with 18 ocean going vessels set to begin service.

Ocean Cay (Artist's rendering of the MSC custom built island, the Ocean Cay MSC Marine Reserve.)

Cruise Building: Growing, Cleaner and Not Always Bigger

2019 will be the biggest year ever for new ship introductions.The ships are coming. Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) suggests that in the coming year 18 new ships are on order for CLIA cruise lines. The next few years will see the arrival of new cruise giants at PortMiami and Port Canaveral. But first they will need giant terminals.The Global Impact of Cruise LinesCLIA estimates 30 million travelers will cruise next year, up six percent from 28.2 million in 2018;…

Micky Arison, chairman of Carnival Corporation & plc  (Photo courtesy of FCCA)

Arison Take the Helm for FCCA

The Florida-Caribbean Cruise Association (FCCA), the trade association that represents the mutual interests between destinations and stakeholders in the Caribbean and Latin America and FCCA Member Lines, which operate 95 percent of the global cruising capacity, has announced that Micky Arison, chairman of Carnival Corporation & plc, will become chairman of the FCCA Executive Committee and Albino Supino Di Lorenzo, vice president of cruise operations for MSC Cruises USA, will become chairman of the FCCA Operations Committee…

Image: CLIA

Cruise Industry to Cut Carbon Emissions 40%

The Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) announced an industry commitment to reduce the rate of the global fleet's carbon emissions 40% by 2030, from a 2008 baseline."We aspire to the International Maritime Organization’s vision of a carbon-free shipping industry by the end of the century," said Arnold Donald, global CLIA chairman and president and CEO, Carnival Corp. & plc. "Our commitment to a 40 percent reduction in the rate of emissions by 2030 is a strong first step…

Kelly Craighead (Photo: CLIA)

Craighead Appointed as CLIA President and CEO

Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) has announced that its Global Executive Committee has appointed Kelly Craighead as President and Chief Executive Officer effective January 1, 2019. Craighead will be taking over the role currently held by Cindy D'Aoust, who in July of this year announced her intent to leave her position by year’s end.Craighead has spent over 15 years in the public and private sectors, recently serving as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Travel and Tourism in the U.S.

Kierstin M Lachtman (Photo: LSC)

Lachtman to Succeed Ludwiczak as Head of LSC

Kierstin M Lachtman is to take over as General Secretary of the Liberian Shipowners’ Council Ltd (LSC) in February 2019 from Joseph E Ludwiczak, who is retiring after 17 years at the helm.Kierstin, who will operate from the LSC offices in Dulles, Virginia, is currently Manager, Maritime Policy for Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) in Washington DC. There, her responsibilities include developing maritime policy in concert with shipowner members, determining and co-ordinating shipping industry positions on safety…

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Asian Cruise Market Growth Continues -Report

Cruise vacations are growing increasingly popular in Asian markets, according to the latest report from trade association Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA).Asian-sourced ocean cruise passenger numbers hit another record high in 2017 with more than 4 million taking an ocean cruise (up 20.6 percent), CLIA’s 2018 Asia Cruise Trends report revealed.Asia accounted for about 15 percent of total global ocean passenger volume in 2017 as mainland China maintained its dominance as a key source market…

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CLIA Scouting for New President, CEO

Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) said that Cindy D’Aoust, president and CEO, will be step down at the end of the year to focus on family priorities. D’Aoust will remain in her role until a successor is identified and will help oversee the transition of a new leader. CLIA’s Global Executive Committee are developing a transition plan that will include a search for a new president and CEO.CLIA has retained the services of executive search firm Russell Reynolds Associates to lead the search for a new president and CEO.

Photo:  Freeport of Riga

Freeport of Riga Joins Cruise Lines International Association

Continuing its active work on attracting more cruise ships and, respectively, more cruise passengers to Riga, the Freeport of Riga Authority has become a member of CLIA (Cruise Lines International Association), the world’s largest cruise industry association, said a press release. Membership in this organisation will open a path for closer cooperation between the Freeport of Riga Authority and the world’s largest cruise line operators, thus facilitating the development of the cruise sector in the Port of Riga.

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Cruise Industry Beat 2017 Passenger Projections

The ocean cruise ship industry surpassed 2017 passenger projections, reaching 26.7 million cruise passengers globally up from a projection of 25.8 million, according to the Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA).For 2018, based on the new vessel launch schedule and expected regional deployment, CLIA is projecting another positive year-over-year growth for the industry with a passenger forecast of 28 million.“Once again, the cruise industry has raised the bar and exceeded projections and expectations…

Photo:  International Maritime Organization (IMO)

Maritime Pilots Recognized with IMO Bravery Accolade

Two maritime pilots who defied fire to bring a burning ship to safety, averting a major maritime catastrophe, received the 2017 IMO Award for Exceptional Bravery at Sea during the 2017 IMO awards ceremony, held on Monday (27 November). Pilots Captain Michael G. McGee and Captain Michael C. Phillips, from Houston, United States, were recognized for their role in averting a major tragedy in September 2016. The ship they were piloting, the 247 meters-long tanker Aframax River, broke…

(Photo: MSC Cruises)

Cruise Sector on Track for Growth in 2018 -CLIA

The cruise industry is expected to stay on course for further growth in 2018, according to the latest State of the Cruise Industry Outlook report from trade association Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA). “It is without question that the cruise industry continues on a growth trajectory, gaining in consumer interest and creating a positive impact on the global economy,” said Cindy D’Aoust, president and CEO, CLIA. CLIA said current data shows cruise travel is steadily on the rise with a projected 27.2 million passengers expected to set sail in 2018.

Photo: International Maritime Organization - IMO Official FB Page

Call for Carriage Ban on Non-Compliant Fuel

A group of leading environmental and maritime shipping organizations have called for the prohibition of transporting non-compliant marine fuels once the global 0.5 percent sulfur cap takes effect in 2020. The United Nation's International Maritime Organization (IMO) has agreed that from 1st January 2020 the maximum permitted sulphur content of marine fuel (outside Emission Control Areas) will reduce from 3.5% to 0.5%. Unless a ship is using an approved equivalent compliance method, there should be no reason for it to be carrying non-compliant fuels for combustion on board.

(Image: Damen)

Shipbuilding: Damen's New Journey

The cruise market is experiencing a period of success. The segment has been growing by around 6.7 percent annually for some time now and with strong growth for seen in some markets – notably China – the potential for the industry is considerable. In 2017 alone, some 26 million people embarked on a cruise vacation. Industry trade group Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) says that this trend is likely to continue, well into the future. There is rising demand for expedition cruise vessels…

(Credit: South Carolina Port Authority)

The Cruise Industry Business Model Evolves

Shifting populations, desirable destinations and yes – economics – drive the cruise industry of tomorrow. Unlike the cargo side of shipping, the cruise business has seen a steadily upward trajectory, with steady growth over decades. The 2018 annual “State of the Cruise Industry” report from Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) was projecting a count of 27.2 million passengers for 2018, showing a steady rise from the 19.1 million, the figure for the beginning of the decade, and a substantial increase from 25.8 million in 2017.

The MSC Seaside, first of the MSC Seaside class to sail from PortMiami. (Credit: MSC)

New Ships, Passenger Records Pace Global Growth

The relentless increases in luxury ocean and river travel that has propelled the cruise industry in 2017 to new passenger records is a clear indication that 2018 and the next five years will see a new era in global travel. Even as the Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) counted up the record number of global cruise passengers in 2017, CLIA member cruise lines are scheduled to debut 27 new ocean, river and specialty expedition ships this coming year. Among the most interesting of those ships are the two new Ponant ships…