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Sunday, April 21, 2019

China National Offshore Oil Corp News

Pic: Phoenix Petroleum

Phoenix Petroleum to Build Philippines First LNG Terminal

Philippines fuel retailing firm Phoenix Petroleum said it won government approval to build the country’s first liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal in partnership with China National Offshore Oil Corp (CNOOC).The Department of Energy (DOE) has granted notice to proceed (NTP) to their joint venture firm Tanglawan Philippines LNG Inc. to build an LNG terminal in Batangas.Phoenix Petroleum said in a stock exchange annoucement that it plans to break ground on the facility within the year.

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Philippines Short-lists Three Groups for LNG Terminal Project

The Philippines has short-listed three different groups to build and operate its first liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal and hopes to nominate one by November, its energy minister said on Tuesday.Short-listed companies were chosen from 18 groups that submitted proposals for the project, Alfonso Cusi told Reuters on the sidelines of the Singapore International Energy Week.They include state-owned Philippines National Oil Company (PNOC), which is seeking a partner for the project…

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Phoenix Petroleum, CNOOC Partner for LNG Terminal

Philippine fuel retailer Phoenix Petroleum said it had agreed to partner with a subsidiary of state-owned China National Offshore Oil Corp (CNOOC) to explore building a receiving terminal for liquefied natural gas in the country.The Philippines is seeking investors to build a storage and distribution facility for imported LNG as it moves to replace its Malampaya gas reserves, expected to be depleted by 2024.Phoenix Petroleum, owned by a local businessman who helped bankroll President Rodrigo Duterte's 2016 election campaign…

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Top LNG Buyers Form Alliance to Push for Flexible Contracts

The world's biggest liquefied natural gas (LNG) buyers are clubbing together to secure more flexible supply contracts in a move that further shifts power to buyers rather than producers. Japan, China and South Korea are the world's biggest LNG importers, accounting for about 55 percent of global purchases, according to data from energy consultancy Wood Mackenzie. The countries' biggest respective buyers are joining together to extract concessions from producers that would give them supply flexibility such as having the right to re-sell imports to third parties…