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Saturday, February 27, 2021

Bar Code News

Image credit: Port of Los Angeles - Liquid Terminals

Today’s Maritime Security: Is the Industry Prepared?

In late June of 2017, AP Moeller-Maersk shut down its container operations at the Port of Los Angeles. It wasn’t due to labor relations problems, equipment malfunction or other reasons that have been known to thwart port operations. It was a cyber-attack. In today’s climate of information technology, there’s no telling where hackers lurk or a cyber security compromises may occur. For the maritime industry and its extended supply chains, the threat is real and looming. “At the local Maersk facility in L.A.…

GAC, Hemas team on Sri Lanka Logistics Facility

GAC Sri Lanka has partnered with Hemas Transportation to build an integrated logistics facility in Muthurajawela Industrial Zone in the western part of Sri Lanka. It will comprise a state-of-the-art distribution center, a container yard and a 15-acre warehouse. A groundbreaking ceremony, graced by the Prime Minister of Sri Lanka, the Honorable Ranil Wickramasinghe, was held. The facility is expected to be operational by early June 2017 and the distribution center by February 2018.

Photo: Gladding Hearn

US Boatbuilding: Exports Buoy Bottom Lines

Market conditions dampen some future prospects, but domestic yards have proven that they can compete overseas, and will do so again when the time is right. These are ‘interesting’ times for U.S. shipbuilders. The tail end of one of the biggest boom cycles seen in the last 50 years also finds some builders at the pointy end of once-fat backorder books and searching for new sources of business. This point in the cycle, however, also provides ample proof that U.S. yards can do more than produce expensive blue water Jones Act hulls for the domestic markets.

Image: © SOCP Information Systems Security Awareness CBT. To obtain your free copy of the ISSA CBT, please contact the SOCP at programadmin@socp.us

Cyber Security: Wake Up Call

Before any vessel gets ready to head out to sea, shore-based personnel and onboard crew run down a lengthy list of safety, compliance and regulatory checks, all part of a standard risk management exercise. What’s often not on that list is an invisible, but looming risk that if ignored, could leave ships off course, off schedule or even dead in the water, thanks to infected computer systems, phony or corrupted charts and blocked communications signals. Cyber crime has come of age in the maritime sector.

Paper Chartwork: File picture

Admiralty Paper Charts: Added QR Codes Bring Digital Benefits

In an initiative to deliver the benefits of digital solutions to users of paper navigational charts, the United Kingdom Hydrographic Office (UKHO) says it has introduced QR codes to its portfolio of Standard Nautical Charts. All newly printed versions of 3,371 Standard Nautical Charts and Mariners’ Routeing Guides, including Print-On- Demand charts, now feature a unique QR code. By scanning the QR code, the user will be taken directly to the relevant page for the scanned chart on the UKHO’s searchable Notes to Mariners database…

'Pst... Wanna Buy a Cheap Chart?'

The UK Hydrographic Office (UKHO) sees an increase in the number of counterfeit versions of its Admiralty charts & publications. Counterfeit documents do not satisfy SOLAS carriage requirements, as they have not been issued by an officially approved government body or authorised hydrographic office. They may also fall foul of Flag State Authorities and Port State Control rules, as well as increasing the safety risk for vessels, crews and cargoes. UKHO's John Dawson said: ‘We urge purchasers, users, inspectors and regulators to be vigilant for counterfeit Admiralty charts and publications.

Q4 2019  - Short Sea Shipping Ports