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Tuesday, July 14, 2020

Another News

Image: Moore Stephens UK

Ship Operating Costs to Increase for 2017 and 2018

Vessel operating costs are expected to rise in both 2017 and 2018, according to Moore Stephens' survey. Repairs & maintenance and spares are the cost categories which are likely to increase most significantly in each of the two years. The survey is based on responses from key players in the international shipping industry, predominantly shipowners and managers in Europe and Asia. Those responses revealed that vessel operating costs are likely to rise by 2.1% in 2017 and by 2.4% in 2018.

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Vessel Operating Costs on the Rise -Moore Stephens

Vessel operating costs are expected to rise in both 2017 and 2018, according to the latest survey by international account and shipping consultant Moore Stephens. Repairs and maintenance and spares are the cost categories which are likely to increase most significantly in each of the two years. The survey is based on responses from key players in the international shipping industry, predominantly shipowners and managers in Europe and Asia. Those responses revealed that vessel operating costs are likely to rise by 2.1 percent in 2017 and by 2.4 percent in 2018.

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Shipping Confidence Continues to Climb -Report

A recent survey found that shipping confidence reached its highest rating in the past three years in the three months to end-August 2017. According to the latest Shipping Confidence Survey from international accountant and shipping adviser Moore Stephens, the average confidence level expressed by respondents to the survey was up slightly from the 6.1 out of 10 recorded in the previous survey in May 2017 to a three-year high of 6.2. The improved rating was attributable mainly to increased confidence on the part of owners, up from 6.1 to 6.5.

Richard Greiner (Photo: Moore Stephens)

Shipping Confidence is Low -Moore Stephens

Overall confidence levels in the shipping industry fell to a record low in the three months to February 2016, according to the latest Shipping Confidence Survey from international accountant and shipping adviser Moore Stephens. The average confidence level expressed by respondents in the markets in which they operate was 5.0 on a scale of 1 (low) to 10 (high). This compares to the 5.6 recorded in November 2015, and is the lowest rating in the life of the survey, which was launched in May 2008 with a confidence rating of 6.8.

File photo: Aurelie Moulin

Shippers’ Confidence Dips Slightly -Moore Stephens

Overall confidence levels in the shipping industry fell in the three months to November 2015, according to the latest Shipping Confidence Survey from international accountant and shipping adviser Moore Stephens. The average confidence level expressed by respondents in the markets in which they operate was 5.6 on a scale of 1 (low) to 10 (high). This compares to the 5.9 recorded in August 2015. The survey was launched in May 2008 with a confidence rating of 6.8. All main categories of respondent recorded a fall in confidence this time, most notably charterers (down from 6.5 to 5.5).

File photo

Shipping Confidence at 7-year Low -Survey

Overall confidence levels in the shipping industry fell during the three months to May 2015 to a level equal to the lowest rating recorded in the past seven years, according to the latest Shipping Confidence Survey from international accountant and shipping adviser Moore Stephens. Respondents complained predominantly about low freight rates and overtonnaging, while some expressed continuing doubts about private equity funding. In May 2015, the average confidence level expressed by respondents in the markets in which they operate was 5.3 on a scale of 1 (low) to 10 (high)…

Richard Greiner

Overtonnage, Regulations Bruise Shippers' Confidence

Overall confidence levels in the shipping industry fell during the three months to November 2014 to their lowest level for two years, according to the latest Shipping Confidence Survey from international accountant and shipping adviser Moore Stephens. The survey revealed increasing concern about the high cost of achieving compliance with new regulations, and ongoing doubts about overtonnaging. But it was not all bad news, with charterers, managers and brokers all more confident than they were three months previously of making a new investment over the coming year.

Richard Greiner

Charterers Remain Optimistic Despite Small Downturn

Overall confidence levels in the shipping industry fell slightly during the three months to August 2014, according to the latest Shipping Confidence Survey from international accountant and shipping adviser Moore Stephens. They are, however, still higher than at the corresponding period twelve months ago, and confidence among charterers actually reached a six-year high. The amount of anticipated significant new investment over the next twelve months was down over the three-month period…

Image courtesy of Moore Stephens

Scottish Independence Would Hurt Maritime Sector

A vote for independence from the U.K. would have a negative effect on the Scottish shipping and offshore maritime sector, according to a survey by leading international accountant and shipping adviser Moore Stephens. The survey elicited the views of leading members of the international shipping community on the predicted impact on Scotland’s shipping and offshore maritime industry of the country voting for independence on September 18 2014. More than half the number of respondents to the survey felt that a vote for independence would have a negative effect.

Shipping Confidence Infographic (Credit Moore Stephen)

Survey Finds Decrease in Shipping Confidence

Overall confidence levels in the shipping industry fell slightly during the time span between March and May. Though, they remain at their second-highest level over the past six years, according to the latest Shipping Confidence Survey provided by Moore Stephens. Expectations of new investment were maintained over the three-month period, but the prospect for higher freight rates softened in the tanker and dry bulk sectors. Uncertainty over the likely effect of an increase in private equity funding…

Richard Greiner

Shipping Confidence at Highest Level Since 2008

Overall confidence levels in the shipping industry rose to their highest level for almost six years in the three-month period to February 2014, according to the latest Shipping Confidence Survey from international accountant and shipping adviser Moore Stephens. Freight rates look set to improve or maintain existing levels over the next twelve months, while an increase in private equity funding is expected to have a major impact on the industry. In February 2014, the average confidence…

Richard Greiner

Survey: Shipping Confidence at Three-Year High

Overall confidence levels in the shipping industry rose to their highest level for more than three years over the three-month period to November 2013, according to the latest Shipping Confidence Survey from international accountant and shipping adviser Moore Stephens. There was encouraging news on freight rates and evidence of an increased willingness to invest. But concern persists on overtonnaging, operating costs and the cost of regulation. In November 2013, the average confidence level expressed by respondents in the markets in which they operate was 6.1 on a scale of 1 (low) to 10 (high)…

Shipping Confidence Holds Firm

Overall confidence levels in the shipping industry held firm over the three-month period to August 2013, maintaining the highest level reached since November 2010, according to the latest Shipping Confidence Survey from international accountant and shipping adviser Moore Stephens. Doubts persist, however, over the level of excess tonnage and the resultant effect on freight rates, while there is growing concern over the increasing cost of regulation. In August 2013, the average…

U.K. Shipping Sector More Confident, Survey Finds

The survey indicates freight-rate improvements and greater likelihood of new investment in the next 12 months. Overall confidence levels in the international shipping industry recovered to their highest level for two years in the three months ending February 2013, while U.K.-based manufacturers expect output to accelerate sharply in the next three months. The latest Shipping Confidence Survey from Moore Stephens says there was improved expectation of freight rate increases over the next 12 months, particularly in the dry bulk sector, and greater likelihood of new investment in the industry.

Survey: Shipping Confidence Reaches Highest Level for Two Years

Overall confidence levels in the shipping industry recovered to their highest level for two years in the three months ended February 2013, according to the latest Shipping Confidence Survey from international accountant and shipping adviser Moore Stephens. There was improved expectation of freight rate increases over the next twelve months, particularly in the dry bulk sector, and greater likelihood of new investment in the industry. In February 2013, the average confidence level expressed by respondents in the markets in which they operate was 5.8 on a scale of 1 (low) to 10 (high)…

Moore Stephens shipping partner, Richard Greiner

Shipping Confidence Builds Despite Eurozone Fears

Overall confidence levels and the likelihood of major new investments in the shipping industry in the next 12 months picked up marginally in the quarter ended November 2011, according to the latest Shipping Confidence Survey from leading accountant and shipping adviser Moore Stephens. This was tempered by an expectation of a rise in finance costs. Respondents also continued to exhibit a high level of concern about the negative impact of overtonnaging on the market amid continuing fears about the global economic climate, and the eurozone crisis in particular.

Shipping Confidence on the Rise in 2013

Overall confidence levels in the shipping industry recovered slightly from their lowest level for over four years in the three months ended November 2012, according to the latest Shipping Confidence Survey from international accountant and shipping adviser Moore Stephens. The small uptick in confidence appears to be related, among other things, to an increase in scrapping and to the start of a gradual improvement in the overtonnaging crisis which has dogged the industry for several years. Improved confidence is also reflected in a marginal increase in planned investments over the coming year.