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Tuesday, October 27, 2020

Ana Mano News

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Paranaguá Port Resumes Grain Loading After Fire

The Port of Paranaguá, Brazil's second busiest for soybean and sugar cargoes, is gradually resuming grain export operations after a fire that affected conveyor belts at two terminals, according to a statement from the port authority on Wednesday.Operations remain halted at the two affected terminals, connected to berths 212, 213 and 214, which form part of an export corridor comprising 11 terminals, the authority said.The belts at the two terminals struck by the fire were idle at the time it broke out…

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Brazil on a Grain Exporting Spree

Brazil is expected to export 11.9 million tonnes of soybeans in June, a 37% rise from the same month last year, as Chinese demand remains strong and ports operate normally amid the COVID-19 pandemic, industry group Anec said on Tuesday.Exports of corn from Brazil are seen at 774,850 tonnes in the month based on shipping data, Anec said in a report.Anec also raised its annual export projection for 2020 to 78 million tonnes of soybeans, up from a prediction of 73 million tonnes in April.Brazil’s July soy exports are predicted to be 7.25 million tonnes while corn sales abroad are estimated at 3.9

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Brazil Maritime Trade Surplus Widens

Brazil recorded a $19.7 billion maritime trade surplus in the first four months of the year as imports by value fell as the real currency weakened and exports of agriculture goods remained strong, a port operators group said on Monday.The surplus is 14.56% wider than in the same period of 2019 despite the crisis caused by the novel coronavirus, which has disrupted transport systems worldwide, said ATP, which represents Brazilian private-sector terminal operators including miner…

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Brazil's Itaqui Port Open Despite Lockdown, Grain Shipments Up

Brazil's Itaqui port, from where more than 10% of the country's soybeans were exported in 2019, has not been affected by lockdown measures imposed this week in Maranhão state, said Ted Lago, the port's president, on Thursday.Port activity is considered exempt from the order and personnel, rail services and trucks continue to have normal access, Lago said, adding that grain export volume is set to rise thanks to the resilience of the domestic farm sector. (Reporting by Ana Mano Editing by Chizu Nomiyama)

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Brazil Soybean Exports Hit Record in April

Brazilian soybean exports in April reached 16.3 million tonnes, an all-time record for a single month and an increase from 9.4 million tonnes in same month last year, according to average daily export data released on Monday by the government.The previous record was 12.35 million tonnes, set in May 2018. Brazil, the world’s largest exporter of soybeans, had shipped 11.64 million tonnes of soybeans in March, according to government data, as local farmers finish collecting yet another bumper crop.(Reporting by Roberto Samora Ana Mano)

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Coronavirus Slows Brazil's Tropical Fruit Exports to EU

Brazilian producers of tropical fruits including mangoes and papayas have been hit by falling European demand amid coronavirus and feel burnt after excessively relying on EU sales, lobby group Abrafrutas told Reuters on Monday.Europe was the second major hot-spot for the COVID-19 epidemic that began in China and orders from the continent began to fall as a result of lockdowns to contain the virus, Jorge de Souza, manager for projects and international promotion at Abrafrutas, said in an interview.While most domestic fruit production can be redirected to the Brazilian market…

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Coronavirus Upends Global Food Supply Chains

In the fertile Satara district in western India, farmers are putting their cattle on an unorthodox diet: Some feed iceberg lettuce to buffalo. Others feed strawberries to cows.It’s not a treat. They can either feed their crops to animals or let them spoil. And other farmers are doing just that - dumping truck loads of fresh grapes to rot on compost heaps.The farmers cannot get their produce to consumers because of lockdowns that aim to stop the spread of coronavirus. In India…

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Brazil Blocks Costa Cruise Crew from Coming Ashore Due to Coronavirus

A Brazilian court has barred crew members from disembarking from the Costa Fascinosa cruise ship anchored with no passengers at the port of Santos after some of their mates developed coronavirus symptoms, city authorities said on Monday.All passengers on the ship, which has a capacity for 3,800 passengers and crew, were disembarked on March 17 at Santos and only the crew remained in quarantined.Santos is Latin America's largest port and where most of Brazil's agriculture commodities are exported.Last week…

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Meatpacker JBS Flags Export Logistics Issues Amid Coronavirus

Brazil's JBS SA, the world's largest meatpacker, has identified potential logistics issues amid the coronavirus crisis including container shortages and port disruptions, according to executives discussing earnings results on Thursday.JBS executives said in a call on fourth-quarter earnings results that its export operations had not been hit by any disruptions, such as those that have affected frozen container cargos arriving in China in recent weeks. They said the company is banking on its long-term relationships with shipping providers to keep exports flowing.

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Dock Workers at Brazil's Santos Port Call off Strike Vote

A union representing the on-demand dock workers has called off a vote that had been scheduled for Monday on whether to hold a strike at Latin America's largest port over concerns about risks from the coronavirus outbreak.In a statement on Sunday, the union - which said it represents about 5,000 people - said the cancellation of the vote was due to a request from government officials.

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Santos Port Operating Normally Amid Coronavirus

Latin America's largest port in Santos in Brazil will maintain regular operations, port operators said after meeting with dock workers and authorities on Wednesday to discuss measures to deal with the coronavirus outbreak.In a statement sent to Reuters, Regis Prunzel, president of operators group Sopesp, said a crisis committee was created with representatives from all stakeholders at the port, where most of Brazil's coffee, sugar, soybeans, corn and cotton are exported to the world.One of the measures agreed on Wednesday will reduce large group gatherings on port premises…

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Rumo Says No Impact from Coronavirus on Soy Freight

An executive at Brazil's largest railway operator Rumo said soy crushing in China is returning to normal levels after an extended halt, a good sign for logistics operators involved in moving the oilseeds from Brazil's fields to the world's top importing country.Speaking at an event on Monday, Rumo's Chief Executive João Alberto Abreu said ship line-up data for soy vessels at Brazil's biggest port of Santos is robust, adding the company has not yet seen any fallout from the novel coronavirus outbreak on freight activity.

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Brazil Transport Agency to Revise Govt-set Freight Prices

National transport agency ANTT will revise Brazil's minimum truck freight prices, the regulator said in a statement late on Saturday, without providing details or a time-frame for an announcement of new government-set values.ANTT said on its website it would "promote the necessary adjustments" after "variations in the price of diesel fuel."On Friday, state-run oil company Petroleo Brasileiro SA lifted diesel prices by 13 percent at the refinery gate after oil regulator ANP disclosed…

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Brazil Freight Policy Signed into Law

Brazil's President Michel Temer signed into law a bill authorizing the government to set minimum truck freight prices, drawing criticism from farm groups who said the measures would drive up costs for food.According to a decision published in the official gazette on Thursday, Temer only vetoed one provision that would have pardoned truckers from paying fines for their role in staging an 11-day strike in May. The stoppage crippled Brazil's roads, hampering deliveries of everything from fuel to grains.The new law requires truck freight prices to be equal to…

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COFCO Says Brazil Needs More Logistics Investments

Brazil could compete better in global agriculture markets if it increased infrastructure investment and diversified its transport network, an executive at COFCO International, the Chinese commodities trader, said on Monday.Eduardo Gradiz Filho, head of grains and oilseeds for COFCO in the country, said at an agribusiness conference that Brazil's port infrastructure is adequate but the country still relies too much on trucks to ship farm products, which is inefficient.Solving what he called "logistical bottlenecks" is Brazil's greatest challenge over the next few years to leverage its competiti

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Brazil May Import U.S. Soybeans due to U.S.-China Trade Spat

Brazil, the world's largest soybean exporter, may have to import the oilseed from the United States this year to satisfy demand from local processors, an executive of exporters association Anec said on Thursday. If China's demand for Brazilian soy rises due to a trade war with the United States, local processors may have to resort to importing 500,000 to 1 million tonnes from the United States, Luis Barbieri told an event in Sao Paulo. China has announced 25 percent tariffs on a range of U.S. products scheduled to take effect from July 6.

Brazil Beef Exports Hit Bottom

A truckers' strike in May that crippled traffic on Brazil's main roads and trade bans on the country's beef caused exports in June to fall to their lowest level for the month in 15 years, consultancy INTL FCStone said.Citing data from the government, the consultancy also said Brazilian exports in June had their worst monthly performance since January 2011.Brazilian beef exports totaled 54,390 tons last month, 45.4% below the same month in 2017. This compared with about 100,000 tons for June last year…

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Brazil Freight Impasse Lingers

A Brazilian Supreme Court hearing ended with no consensus on the adoption of minimum freight prices and whether such prices should be dictated by the government, Justice Luiz Fux said on Wednesday.Minimum freight prices, introduced by decree after an 11-day truckers' strike last month that snarled the country's roads, was imposed by the government as one of the measures to end the stoppage.Users of freight services fretted over the government's intervention, denouncing the measure as expensive and a threat to free markets.A flurry of lawsuits ensued, and the Supreme Court is now expected to ho

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Sugar Stocks at Brazilian Ports 'Near Zero'

Sugar stocks at the main exporting ports in Brazil, the world's largest producer and exporter of the sweetener, are "near zero" due to truckers' protests in the country, industry group Unica said on Thursday.In a statement, Unica said that if protests do not end, sugar and ethanol shipments will be suspended soon.

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Weak Currency, Global Trade Jitters Bolster Brazil Soy Exports

Brazil's soybean exports hit record volumes last month, grain exporter association Anec said on Thursday, citing a weak domestic currency and trade tensions between the United States and China for bolstering business for local farmers.Brazil's April soybean exports reached 11.63 million tonnes, about 1 million tonnes more than the same month last year, Anec said in a report."Evidently, with the strength of the dollar, the producer will free up more beans for export," Sérgio Mendes, head of Anec, said in a telephone interview.

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Brazil Logistics Worry Soy Farmers, Exporters as Harvest Starts

As Brazil's soy farmers begin harvesting, problems on a road connecting the country's agricultural heartland to northern ports provide new evidence the world's largest exporter of the oilseeds is far from solving its logistical bottlenecks. Over the last few days, soy truckers posted numerous videos, including footage shot from drones, on social media showing they were unable to move on an unpaved stretch of the BR-163 federal highway in Pará state. The most affected area was around the district of Moraes Almeida…

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Santos Port to Suspend Shipments of Live Animals

The company that operates Latin America’s largest port in the Brazilian city of Santos said on Friday it will suspend shipments of live animals. The company detailed its decision in a letter seen by Reuters that was sent by state-run Companhia Docas do Estado de São Paulo to a congressman. A press officer at Codesp, as the state-run operator is known, said the letter was authentic. Later, the company sent a statement confirming the suspension. The statement said that kind of operation…

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Grain Trade Boosts Brazil's Itaqui Port

Brazil's Itaqui port, the country's closest deepwater gateway to the Panama Canal, has projected a rise in 2017 shipping volumes thanks to a record grain harvest and development of a new northern farming frontier. Most of Itaqui's export cargo arrives by train instead of roads. It is the deepest public port in Brazil, and its travel time to Europe and North America is seven days shorter than from rivals in the South. Itaqui can handle minerals, grains, fertilizers, fuel and woodpulp consignments.

Brazil Soy Exports Hit All-time High in August

Brazilian soy exports hit an all-time high for the month of August, an industry association said, as many farmers resumed sales after delaying shipments in hopes of securing better prices amid a bumper 2016/17 crop. According to cereals exporter association Anec, Brazil shipped 5.7 million tonnes of the oilseeds last month, about 500,000 tonnes above August 2015, which until now had seen the highest volume for the month yet. Brazil has so far this year exported 57.6 million tonnes of the grain.

ADM Brazil Unit Invests $85 Mln in Santos Port

The Brazilian unit of Archer Daniels Midland Co on Friday said it had completed a 33 percent expansion in its Santos port terminal's export capacity to 8 million tonnes of grains per year. The company invested 280 million reais ($85.19 million) in the project, which comes two years after Brazil extended ADM's license to move grains including soybeans and corns at the terminal for 20 years through 2037. The investment underscores the company’s commitment to retaining a leading position in Brazil, whose agricultural heartland is seen as critical to supplying expanding world food markets.

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Brazil Mulls Longer, Flexible Port Licenses to Draw Investment

Brazil may revise public port regulations to lengthen operators' contracts and encourage improvements, officials told Reuters, in an effort to attract more private investment in infrastructure that is crucial to the country's powerhouse farm sector. Building on the success of recent airport and power line auctions , President Michel Temer's government is hoping to add capacity at ports exporting commodities from sugar and coffee to soy at some of the world's lowest prices. Samuel Cavalcanti…