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Monday, December 9, 2019

3D Printing News

Photo: Wilhelmsen Ships Service

Wilhelmsen Launches 3D Printed Spares EAP

Wilhelmsen has launched an early adopter program for 3D printed marine spare parts. A strategic move by the six early adopters, Carnival Maritime, Thome Ship Management, OSM Maritime Group, Berge Bulk, Executive Ship Management and Wilhelmsen Ship Management have all signed up with Wilhelmsen’s Marine Products division to begin utilizing on-demand additive manufacturing.Wilhelmsen, in cooperation with Ivaldi Group, will provide spare parts on demand to the selected six customers’ vessels around the globe.

Pic: A probehead for taking gas samples in hot gas atmosphere, produced at the thyssenkrupp TechCenter Additive Manufacturing. It is additive manufactured from austenitic heat resistant steel, and has a longer service life due to integrated cooling channels. Image courtesy of thyssenkrupp

Thyssenkrupp Wins 3D Printing Approval

The international accredited registrar and classification society DNV GL has awarded thyssenkrupp, German multinational conglomerate, first additive manufacturing  approval of manufacturer certificateThe shipping industry is looking to take advantage of additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D printing, to print spare parts, thereby reducing lead times, costs, stock requirements, and environmental impacts. Certification ensures that AM part users can have the same confidence…

Using Technology to Streamline Operations in Container Shipping

That ‘Cloud’ on the horizon is closer than it looks.The container shipping industry faces many challenges, particularly when it comes to increasing uncertainty in the global political and economic environment. The issues between the US and China over trade relations and Brexit in Europe are testing the industry, plus increased regulations and market fluctuations are having a big impact.How container shipping companies operate now and in the future is changing and staying ahead of the curve is crucial for survival.

Photo: Wilhelmsen Ships Service

First Commercial Drone Ship Delivery

Launching this week in partnership with Airbus, Wilhelmsen’s shore-to-ship Singapore pilot project, marks the first deployment of drone technology in real-time port conditions, delivering a variety of small, time-critical items to working vessels at anchorage.Lifting off from Marina South Pier in Singapore with 3D printed consumables from Wilhelmsen’s onshore 3D printing micro-factory, the Airbus Skyways drone navigated autonomously along pre-determined ‘aerial-corridors’ in its 1.5km flight to Eastern Working Anchorage.

File Image: CREDIT GPA

Fitch: Port Growth to Level Off

Volume growth will continue for ports throughout the world but at a more modest pace over the next 10 years, according to Fitch Ratings in a new report. Global port throughput has shown resilience over the last 10 years with throughput growth outpacing economic growth rates despite volatility through the last recession. Containerization of cargo and increasing vessel sizes coupled with supporting infrastructure at ports have all contributed to these throughput trends. However…

From left: Mr Lim Siang Yong, Chief Operating Officer of 3D MetalForge, Mr Ong Kim Pong, Regional CEO (South East Asia) from PSA, Dr Ho Chaw Sing from NAMIC and Mr Andrew Tan, Chief Executive of MPA. Witnessing the signing ceremony are Dr Lam Pin Min, Senior Minister of State, Ministry of Transport and Ministry of Health, and Ms Choy Sauw Kook, Assistant Chief Executive and Director-General, Quality and Excellence, Enterprise Singapore. Photo: MPA

Singapore Pact for 3D Printing in Maritime Sector

The Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) signed two Memoranda of Understanding (MoU) for Additive Manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D printing.The two MoUs are: a) An MoU with PSA Corporation Limited (PSA), the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Cluster (NAMIC) and 3D MetalForge Pte Ltd (3D MetalForge) to establish the world’s first on-site AM production facility for port applications; and b) An MoU with NAMIC and the Singapore Shipping Association (SSA) to…

3D printing to cause turmoil in the ship building industry until 2050 Photo Shipbuilder Software

3D Printing: A Game Changer for Shipbuilders

3D printing will cause so much change in the shipbuilding and shipping sector that the industry must completely alter its approach toward designing and building ships. This is the conclusion of NISS (National Institute for Shipping and Shipbuilding), that has developed a blueprint for the maritime sector until 2050. Geert Schouten, director at Shipbuilder, was part of the team responsible for this blueprint. “3D printing is moving at a rapid pace. It is now possible to, wherever a product is required, to print it on site. Even ships will be partly 3D printed in the future,” Schouten said.

Photo Barcelona Port

Port Challenge Barcelona, committed to innovation and entrepreneurship

Innovation and technology use have become a competitive factor for the transport and logistics sector. The Port has launched Port Challenge Barcelona, a programme to support the creation of new technology-based businesses to improve the efficiency and competitiveness of the Port Logistics Community. This initiative aims to attract entrepreneurs and to create the conditions for developing innovative projects to help modernise the sector. Port Challenge Barcelona will provide the…

Photo: Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore

MPA to Enhance Collaboration with Rotterdam Port

Chief Executive of the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA), Andrew Tan, attended the second Port Authorities Roundtable (PAR) in Rotterdam. Hosted by the Port of Rotterdam Authority (PoR), the closed-door roundtable event brought together port authorities from major ports in Asia, Europe and US to network, exchange views and explore areas of collaboration. Participants included port authorities which attended the inaugural PAR in Singapore such as Ningbo Municipal Port Administration Bureau…

DNV GL's Examines the next Decade's Tech Outlook

Every five years, DNV GL publishes a Technology Outlook report providing insights into the technology landscape of the next decade. Its latest report focuses extensively on top tech trends and the future outlook for maritime, oil and gas, energy, and life sciences. The DNV GL Technology Outlook 2025 identifies four dominant catalysts driving technology innovation globally, namely digitalization, climate change, politics and regulation, and sustainable resource consumption. The digitalization of information flows will spur the automation of existing processes and functions…

Tony Baker, Loss Prevention Director

BIG DATA & Maritime: The Downside

There is no question that the era of "Big Data" -- and all that those two words encompass -- will be transformational in the maritime market for the coming generation. There is no stopping the data trend, and today's generation demands it from a social aspect and needs it to be efficient in business operation. While the upside to big data has been recorded often, the North P&I Club has warned its members that despite the enormous benefits of digital technology on and around ships, there may also be some downsides.

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Europort’s Masterclasses in Leadership

Recognising that effective leadership and collaboration are fundamental elements in the future success of the maritime industry, Europort 2015 will feature a series of masterclasses as part of this year’s conference programme. Each masterclass will address the leadership challenges currently facing the industry across the areas of design, technology, efficiency and human capital. Domino’s recently made headlines with pizzas being delivered to doorsteps by drones. Google describes their self-driving car as ‘the realization of a science fiction dream’.

The first results and the 3D-printed spare parts will be presented at the

3D Printing in Rotterdam Port

Is 3D printing just a hype? Or is it really possible to print spare parts for ships that can actually withstand the requirements set for the often "rough" working practice? This question is to be answered by the project "3D printing of maritime spare parts". "27 marine related companies have formed a consortium initiated by InnovationQuarters in close cooperation with Havenbedrijf Rotterdam and RDM Makerspace. AEGIR-Marine is one of the participants. Today, the consortium agreement has been signed by all participating companies. Will 3D printing give us solutions that we can use and apply?

3-D Printer Model USNS Comfort: Photo credit NSWC

First 3-D Printer Ship Model

Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Carderock complete a fabricated model of the hospital ship 'USNS Comfort'. The state-of-the-art 3-D printer, which is one of four in the United States, provides Carderock with the capability to deliver large, complex ship models. Additionally, the ship models require less assembly time and can be fabricated unattended, 24 hours a day. "3D printing technology is currently being used in industry to produce parts, structures and models for various applications," said NSWC Carderock engineer Francisco "Paco" Rodriguez.