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Tuesday, August 14, 2018

DHS Jones Act Waiver: Addressing the Unknown

Posted to Maritime Law (by J. Michael Cavanaugh) on September 14, 2017

By J. Michael Cavanaugh and Eric LeeActing Secretary of Homeland Security Elaine Duke has issued an extension of the original September 8 Jones Act waiver to September 22. The extended waiver, dated September 11, 2017, but only recently posted by the U.S.

Security and the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach

Posted to Port Security (by Kelly Hicks) on September 14, 2017

Living near the Pacific Ocean provides numerous benefits to the people of Southern California. Not only do we enjoy the beauty and peacefulness of the water, but we also benefit by the economic wanderlust it provides. The Port of Los Angeles is one of the world's largest trade gateways.

The Experience of Hiring

Posted to The Hiring Process (by Thomas Montgomery) on September 7, 2017

One of the things companies struggle with in hiring is deciding to hire experienced versus inexperienced people. It’s a legitimate concern, particularly if experience is important in a job. For example, if you need a doctor to operate on you…

Not Quite Eclipsed

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on September 1, 2017

Charlotte, NC: On August 21, the so-called ‘Path of Totality’ for a rare but much ballyhooed Solar Eclipse missed my hometown by a whisker, leaving us with a 98% eclipse.Just a 90-mile drive to the south, in Columbia, SC, tens of thousands of people flocked to see the real deal.

Autonomous Shipping: Don’t Miss the Boat

Posted to Accelerating Innovation (by Mare Straetmans) on August 30, 2017

The Norwegian company Yara is currently building a full-electrical containership fitted with an autonomous control system: the Yara Birkeland. During a recent visit to a major maritime conference, imagine my surprise when most attendees – some…

The Regulatory Hammer Pounds the Waterfront

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on August 17, 2017

You may have missed the memorandum, but it turns out that the maritime industry – you know, the one which moves 95% of what you use on a daily basis? – is bad for the environment. Very bad. I didn’t actually know this until I read a recent article that asked…

Discussing LNG as a Marine Fuel in Port Canaveral, Fla.

Posted to From the desk of FMC Commissioner Doyle (by William P. Doyle) on August 15, 2017

On August 9, 2017, I had the opportunity to visit and tour Port Canaveral, Fla. and discuss liquefied natural gas (LNG) as a marine fuel. Attendees at the discussion included Port Canaveral leadership, staff, port partners and tenants, representatives of the U.S.

Putting Scale in Perspective

Posted to Dejan Radosavljevic's Blog (by Dejan Radosavljevic) on August 3, 2017

At any marine conference or workshop, you will hear many topics being debated: validation and accuracy of CFD predictions, best practices in simulation, the latest industry regulations affecting ship design and many more. One topic that always…

Sourcing Candidates: Quality from the Start

Posted to The Hiring Process (by Thomas Montgomery) on July 21, 2017

By Vicki Morgan and Thomas MontgomeryWhat do you do? Crew Dispatch is screaming they can’t crew their boats because HR won’t hire any people. Operations Managers and Port Captains complain that the people you hire don’t know anything, so why can’t HR hire more experienced people?

Marine Safety: Unfinished (but everyone’s) Business

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on July 19, 2017

Contemplating Competence, Commerce, Collisions & Casualties.The dog days of summer are here. That means just about everyone (except, perhaps, yours truly) is on some sort of vacation or another. Many of these people are headed for the beach…

The Panama Canal Expansion Proves Real and Dredging Must Continue

Posted to From the desk of FMC Commissioner Doyle (by William P. Doyle) on July 17, 2017

By Owen Braley and William P. DoyleOn June 26, 2017, Panama celebrated the one-year anniversary of the opening of the expanded Panama Canal. On the inaugural day, the first post-Panamax vessel to transit the expanded canal was the 9,400-plus TEU containership COSCO Shipping Panama.

5 Types of Container Weighing Systems for Ports and Terminals

Posted to Kevin Hill's Blog (by Kevin HIll) on July 17, 2017

Every port and terminal facility needs weighing systems for containers. Weighing is critical in several processes in ports where accurate readings are paramount. To achieve this, the following weighing solutions can be incorporated. 1. WeighbridgesWeighbridges…

An Inside Look at Ballast Water Testing

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on June 21, 2017

Seattle, Washington: Last week’s visit to the Pacific Northwest and its impressive waterfront maritime cluster was highlighted by a visit to the Golden Bear, the training ship of the California Maritime Academy. Now on its annual training cruise…

Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel and IMO - MARPOL’s Annex VI

Posted to From the desk of FMC Commissioner Doyle (by William P. Doyle) on June 6, 2017

The International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) will meet July 3-7, 2017, in London, where the January 1, 2020 implementation of the .50 percent m/m (mass by mass) global sulfur content limit for shipboard fuel oil will be discussed.

Where Do Ports Fit in California's Environmental Regulatory Vision?

Posted to U.S. West Coast Trade (by John McLaurin) on June 1, 2017

California is a state with a long history of dancing to its own tune.We are innovators in culture, fashion, entertainment, business, technology and government regulation.Today, California has an environmental regulatory vision. And at times…

Piloting Choppy Waters

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on May 30, 2017

Uncharted hazards roil the waters for established pilot organizations across the fruited plain. These days, there is never a dull moment for this uniquely American system of piloting deep draft tonnage to and from the ports dotting our 95,000+ miles of coastline.The U.S.

Electrocuted!

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on May 5, 2017

Reluctantly touching the third rail of the American waterfront.I looked up the common idiom of ‘touching the third’ rail this week.Yourdictionary.com explains it like this: The electrified rail that runs besides, or between train tracks to power electric trains.

Constitutional Collision Course

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on April 28, 2017

The Galveston-Texas City Pilots act to head off local federal pilots who want to compete for business in a previously closed space. Their motion in Galveston County District Court may instead force the State to rule on a matter that may or may have not had legs to begin with.

A Tale of Three Ports

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on March 31, 2017

On three coasts, three pilot disputes – like a bad penny that keeps turning up – refuse to go away. Domestic and international stakeholders from sea-to-shining-sea are watching very carefully from the cheap seats.The U.S. system of marine pilot oversight is a familiar one to most of us.

The New Generation of Alliances Set

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on March 21, 2017

On April 1, 2017 a new generation of ocean carrier alliances will become operational. We caught up with Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) Commissioner William P. Doyle after his return from an industry conference earlier this month in Long Beach, Calif.