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Wednesday, February 19, 2020

Battle of Actium

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 23, 2015

After the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 B.C., the Roman Republic was led by the Second Triumvirate, which consisted of Octavian (the adopted son of Julius Caesar), Mark Antony (the magister equitum of Caesar’s army), and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus (a political ally of Julius Caesar).

Vaquita porpoise

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 20, 2015

The vaquita porpoise is small by cetacean standards, averaging just over four feet in length. Identified as a separate species only in 1958, it is found exclusively at the northern end of the Gulf of California. The name is Spanish for “little cow”.

SS City of Rio de Janeiro

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 16, 2015

The steamship City of Rio de Janeiro, which sported a barquentine rig, was built in Chester, Pennsylvania in 1878 to serve the United States & Brazil Mail Steamship Company carrying mail, cargo, and some passengers between the United States and Brazil.

Politics and Religion: on the water

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on January 15, 2015

At about the same time that the U.S. Coast Guard, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and a few dozen other flag states were hashing out the so-called Manila Amendments to the Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW) Code, I had a conversation with the U.S.

Clipper Ship RAINBOW

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 13, 2015

Clipper ships, as a recognized type of vessel, originated with small, fast ships operating out of Baltimore during the War of 1812. Their sharp lines and deeper than usual keels allowed them to sail closer to the wind. They were able to outrun ships of the Royal Navy blockade…

Is it a near miss? Or was it an unsafe act?

Posted to Madden Maritime (by Richard Madden) on January 11, 2015

Is it a near miss? Or was it an unsafe act? Maybe just an unsafe condition. What’s the difference and how do you explain it to your crew when introducing them to your safety management system? Check out nearmiss.dk for more cartoons like the one below.

Ship Scrapping Scandal Simmering?

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on January 9, 2015

It came to my attention just this week that MARAD had recently (October 2014) awarded a ship recycling contract to a Texas company that bid $400,000 less than a Louisiana company for the exact same vessel and contract. For its part, MARAD says…

HMS Terror

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 9, 2015

HMS Terror was a bomb ship constructed by the Royal Navy in 1813. Intended specifically for carrying and firing large mortars (the shells were 10 and 13 inches in diameter), the hull was heavily reinforced. It first saw action in the bombardment of Stonington, Connecticut on 9-12 August 1814.

New Siberian Islands

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 6, 2015

The archipelago called the New Siberian Islands is not new, having existed for eons and containing fossils from the Late Pleistocene (over 100,000 years ago) and probably earlier. Bedrock on the islands is significantly older. The archipelago is comprised of three groups of islands.

Anglerfish

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 2, 2015

Anglerfish belong to the bony fish order Lophiliformes. They range in size from about six inches to more than four feet in length and are generally found in deep pelagic waters or continental shelf waters, often on or near the sea floor. The…

Fatal Ferry Follies

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on December 31, 2014

As the clock ticks down on yet another year, I couldn’t help but take note of the new cruise ship passenger drill requirements, effective from 1 January. These rules involve heightened requirements for mustering of newly embarked passengers prior to or immediately upon departure.

Diomede Islands

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 30, 2014

The Diomedes are two tuya-type islands located in the Bering Strait between Alaska and Siberia. A tuya-type island is a distinctive flat-topped island with steep sides. It is formed when lava from an erupting volcano comes to the surface through a thick glacier or ice sheet.

Iles Eparses

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 26, 2014

Iles Eparses (the Scattered Islands) are an administrative group of uninhabited islands around the coast of Madagascar administered by France. They are combined with certain other French-administered locations into the Terres australes et antarctiques…

Chouest, Bordelon Acquire Bollinger Shipyard Group

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on December 23, 2014

LOCKPORT, La., based Bollinger Shipyards also announced that Ben Bordelon will assume the duties of Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of the company. Ben Bordelon, along with the Chouest family from Galliano, LA, has acquired all assets and stock of Bollinger Shipyards, Inc.

Prirazlomnaya offshore oil platform

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 23, 2014

The Prirazlomnaya offshore oil platform is located in the Pechora Sea (the eastern portion of the Barents Sea) south of Novaya Zemlya and bordered on the east by the Kara Strait. It is the world’s first Arctic-class ice-resistant offshore oil platform in the world.

Mixing Oil & Water

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on December 22, 2014

The resurgence in the U.S. maritime industry and its current robust condition is, in the opinion of many analysts, largely a function of the so-called domestic ‘energy boom.’ That boom, which has catapulted the U.S. into a position of being one of the world’s largest producers…

Battle of Rio de Janeiro

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 19, 2014

French colonialists initially settled in Rio de Janeiro and the adjacent island of Serigipe in 1555. The Portuguese pushed them out in 1567 and expanded their hold on much of present-day Brazil. During the War of the Spanish Succession (1701-1714)…

Great Lakes Maritime Academy

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 16, 2014

Established in 1969, the Great Lakes Maritime Academy in Traverse City, Michigan, is the youngest of the six state maritime academies in the United States. Like the others, it educates and trains individuals for careers as officers in the US Merchant Marine.

California Maritime Academy

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 12, 2014

In 1929, the California Legislature adopted legislation authorizing establishment of the California Nautical School for the purpose of “providing practical and theoretical instruction in navigation, seamanship, steam engines, gas engines, and…

Cargo Moment : Twin 20' Lift Gone Bad

Posted to Madden Maritime (by Richard Madden) on December 10, 2014

The introduction of the standardized cargo freight container changed the shipping industry forever. From literally weeks to discharge and load a ship, cargo operations are now measured in hours. Moving tens of tons of cargo at a time is not without its hazards and drawbacks, however.