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Friday, September 20, 2019

HMS Endeavour

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 2, 2014

The bark HMS Endeavour was built in 1764 as the collier Earl of Pembroke. A type known locally as a Whitby Cat, it had a broad, flat bow, a square stern, a long box-like body with a deep hold, and a flat bottom. Originally ship-rigged, it was…

Cape Cod Canal

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 15, 2014

The Cape Cod Canal is a seven-mile long sea level canal connecting Cape Cod Bay to the north with Buzzards Bay to the south. Maintained by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), it has a minimum channel width of 480 feet and an authorized depth of 32 feet at mean low water.

Dirty shipping business takes place prior to recycling

Posted to Dirty shipping business takes place prior to recycling (by Joseph Fonseca) on September 4, 2013

The hue and cry about casualties taking place at ship breaking yards may have died down after intense hostile protests by Greenpeace and other NGOs against the methods employed in ship breaking yards. They may have got measures in place to curb…

Prison Ship Martyrs’ Monument

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on September 3, 2013

During the American Revolutionary War, British forces captured thousands of “rebels”. Those in uniform were accorded treatment somewhat akin to prisoner of war status. Those not in uniform, particularly the maritime privateers, were subjected to harsher conditions.

Size counts on weak Asia-Europe routes

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on June 19, 2013

The mega vessel sharing agreement between the world’s three biggest container lines is going to completely dominate Asia-Europe trade with ships from Maersk, MSC and CMA CGM having a good 40 percent share of the market. The P3 Network, as it is called…

Port strike not doing Hong Kong any favours

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on April 3, 2013

A port strike is not something normally associated with Hong Kong, but the biggest terminal operator in the city has been crippled for six days now, with no sign of a resolution. Hongkong International Terminals, or HIT, says the strike is costing it more than US$600…

Albatross

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 14, 2012

The albatross is the largest of all birds in terms of wingspan (up to 12 feet). It can be found soaring above all ocean waters of the Southern Hemisphere and above the North Pacific. It is largely absent from the North Atlantic, probably due to loss of habitat.

The Government is Here (to Help)

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on July 11, 2012

Those of you struggling to balance the books at any business on the waterfront know that it just isn’t getting any easier. Dousing the flames by putting the proverbial hose on the problem is complicated enough without the federal and state governments actually adding fuel to fire.

Great Offshore becomes India’s first full member of International Salvage Union

Posted to Great Offshore becomes India’s first full member of International Salvage Union (by Joseph Fonseca) on June 6, 2012

India has finally got their own internationally recognized and fully established salvage company which can now operate beyond the country’s borders and bid for major contracts all over the world that are open only to members of International Salvage Union.

Alfred Thayer Mahan

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on September 16, 2011

Alfred Thayer Mahan (1840-1914) was born at West Point, where his father was an instructor. After graduating with distinction from the US Naval Academy in 1859, he served blockade duty on a number of warships during the Civil War. Mahan was promoted at…

USCG Waives Maritime Security Regulations for Some Facilities

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on July 26, 2011

The US Coast has just issued MTSA Policy Advisory Council Decision 02-11 (PAC 02-11), “Waiving Facilities that Transfer Certain Low Risk Commodities.”  Owners/operators of MTSA-regulated facilities that transfer or store bulk commodities that are listed in the Decision as being low risk can…

Law to curtail Shipping Trade Malpractices

Posted to Law to curtail Shipping Trade Malpractices (by Joseph Fonseca) on March 14, 2011

An Act to facilitate swift and efficient movement of goods in India in relation to export/ import or coastal cargo is set to be enacted soon. It promises to bring transparency in trade practices by publishing of tariff by shipping transport…

Maritime Legislative Report Card:

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on January 19, 2011

It wasn’t too long ago that a former key official in the previous administration advised me that the problem with today’s version of the federal government and legislative arms isn’t the lack of passion to get the job done right. Instead, I was told…

Perihelion

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 4, 2011

The whoosh you experienced at about 1900 UTC on Monday, January 3, 2011 was the sun passing by on its closest approach to the Earth – a mere 91,402,505 miles away. This recurs every year, often at night when it can’t be observed. The date and…

APU / Maritime Reporter WEBCAST Series Kicks off in February

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on December 22, 2010

Maritime stakeholders continue to face complex challenges. Maintaining a healthy bottom line in the face of a myriad of regulatory, environmental and operational risks, therefore, has become Job 1. Preventing the loss of vessel and crew from acts of piracy…

Carriers warn Vale's big bulkers will dampen rates

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on December 9, 2010

The dry bulk shipping business is going through a tough time. It is an incredible 80 percent down on the market peak in May 2008, and rates have led carrier operators on a wild and volatile ride ever since. The industry is currently oversupplied with bulk carriers…

Vizhinjam to become major transshipment port in S. India

Posted to Vizhinjam to become major transshipment port in S. India (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 29, 2010

Vizhinjam, a port located near the Southern tip of India and close to the international shipping route is being developed into a major transshipment port. Once completed it is expected to attract annually over 10,000 ships that is half the number that pass through the Suez Canal.

Back from the (almost) dead

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 5, 2010

The requirement for scanning of 100% of maritime shipping containers in overseas ports prior to loading on a ship bound for the United States was enacted into federal law (with various caveats) by the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007.

Petrobras Expands CENPES Research Center

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on October 12, 2010

With the expansion the complex on Fundão Island will occupy more than 300 thousand m² making it one of the largest centers of applied research in the world. There will be various laboratories designed to meet the technological demands of Petrobras’ business areas…

Plug-in Shore Power

Posted to Marine Propulsion Report (by Keith Henderson) on September 18, 2010

A major factor slowing down the more widespread use of plug-in shore power to permit cold ironing is the lack of a safe, troublesome and easy to use standard for the shore to ship connector. Further complicating the problem is the abundance…
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