28695 members and growing – the largest networking group in the maritime industry!

LoginJoin

Wednesday, September 18, 2019

Improving Skills Assessment

Posted to Murray Goldberg's Blog (by Murray Goldberg) on April 30, 2018

In safety-critical environments such as the maritime industry, it is of utmost importance that an organization can ensure crew competence. And while there are many factors to an individual’s ability to carry out their job properly (such as their knowledge and behavior)…

A License to Let Go

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on April 29, 2015

Almost 35 years ago, I earned my first seagoing credentials, an original Third Mate’s license, courtesy of four years spent at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy. Earlier this month, I finally came to the conclusion that maintaining that ticket…

Prirazlomnaya offshore oil platform

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 23, 2014

The Prirazlomnaya offshore oil platform is located in the Pechora Sea (the eastern portion of the Barents Sea) south of Novaya Zemlya and bordered on the east by the Kara Strait. It is the world’s first Arctic-class ice-resistant offshore oil platform in the world.

NMSAC September 2012 Meeting, Part I

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on September 24, 2012

After introductory remarks by NMSAC’s new Executive Director, USCG Captain Andrew Tucci (the spelling of all names in this post represents my best guesses), the September 11th session dealt with Cybersecurity, Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA)and Information Sharing…

Sea otter

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 31, 2014

The sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a member of the weasel family that ran away to sea. It is the smallest of the marine mammals and the only one that does not rely on fat (blubber) for warmth. Rather, it has the thickest coat of fur of any mammal – up to one million strands of hair per square inch.

Integrating India’s Transport Network

Posted to Integrating India’s Transport Network (by Joseph Fonseca) on March 24, 2014

The logistics sector in India has today become an area of priority. One prime reason for it stems from the fact that years of high growth in the Indian economy have resulted in a significant rise in the volume of freight traffic movement. This…

"What is the point of testing in Maritime Training"? Very few people know the correct answer to this question. This is a problem.

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on February 24, 2014

Maritime Training: The full library of maritime training articles can be found here.Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog…

Blues continue for troubled China Cosco

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on November 13, 2013

Don’t leave town, police told an executive director at China Cosco Holdings last week. Okay, they probably never said that, but it doesn’t change the fact that Xu Minjie is under investigation in what is widely believed to be part of Beijing’s crackdown on widespread corruption.

Stad ship tunnel

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 10, 2013

In a move reminiscent of the Athos Canal, built 483-480 BC at the direction of the Persian Emperor Xerxes, or the Corinth Canal, built in the 1890’s by the Greek Government, Norway has tentatively approved construction of a tunnel through the…

USS Enterprise

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 14, 2012

The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was deactivated at Naval Station Norfolk on 1 December 2012, after 50 years of ground-breaking service. The 1,123-foot long vessel was laid down in 1958 and entered service in 1962 as the world’s first nuclear powered surface warship.

Civil engineers update their report card on ports

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on March 31, 2013

In what is essentially an update of a 2012 report, The American Society of Civil Engineers has awarded a C grade to the nation’s seaports and their efforts to keep up with essential maintenance and improvement. Much of the report I covered in…

Message to shipping is, use clean fuel and save lives

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on March 19, 2013

How about that for telling it like it is. But as stark as the quote is, it unfortunately is not what was said by Hong Kong environment protection outfit Clean Air Network, or CAN. Not exactly, anyway. Still, the message couldn't be clearer: More people will die if shipping does not clean up its act.

SCI acquires Kamsarmax Bulk carrier & PSV

Posted to SCI acquires Kamsarmax Bulk carrier & PSV (by Joseph Fonseca) on December 19, 2012

The Shipping Corporation of India Ltd. (SCI) accepted delivery of a Kamsarmax Bulk carrier, m.v. “Vishva Jyoti” yesterday. The vessel is the first of a series of four Kamsarmax bulk carriers ordered by SCI with Jiangsu Eastern Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., China.

Chinese research icebreaker Xue Long

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 25, 2012

The Xue Long (Snow Dragon) is the premier polar vessel of the People’s Republic of China. It was built in the Ukraine in 1993 and modified upon its acquisition by China in 1994. Its major function is to serve as a resupply vessel and scientific research platform in the Antarctic and the Arctic.

What have we learned from the Titanic casualty?

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 13, 2012

Late on the night of April 14, 1912, the “unsinkable” passenger ship RMS Titanic, on its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York struck an iceberg. It sank about three hours later, at about 2:20 a.m. on April 15, 1912. Of the 2,224 persons on board, 1,514 lost their lives.

Cross-currents show up in the Harbor Maintenance Tax uproar

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 29, 2011

That proposal to apply the Harbor Maintenance Tax to imports taking the long way round through Canada and Mexico is stirring up considerable debate that exposes sharply different viewpoints. So much so that the Shipping Federation of Canada…

Proposed USCG STCW Regulations Impact Maritime Security

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on September 29, 2011

Proposed US Coast Guard regulations to implement the STCW Convention will, if adopted, have both direct and indirect impacts on maritime transportation security programs. That said, implementation of the maritime-security-specific STCW amendments…

Cruise of the Corwin

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 10, 2011

The United States Revenue Cutter (USRC) Thomas Corwin was built in Portland, Oregon in 1876, becoming the first federal government vessel built in the state. She was finished and commissioned in San Francisco in 1877. San Francisco remained her homeport for her entire period of government service.

Offshore gas & oil ship repairs industry set for a makeover for achieving rapid growth

Posted to Offshore gas & oil ship repairs industry set for a makeover for achieving rapid growth (by Joseph Fonseca) on May 30, 2011

The ship repair opportunities in Indian offshore oil and gas sector remained stagnant for two decades as the industry had been mainly dependent on the public sector infrastructure. With few dedicated large players in the field, the several smaller…

Nikumaroro

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 21, 2010

Nikumaroro (previously known as Gardner Island) is a small coral atoll in the central Pacific Ocean situated just south of the Equator and just west of the 180th meridian. It lies in the Phoenix Island Chain and is part of the Republic of Kiribati.
  • 1
  • 2