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Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Bits & Pieces from the Cheap Seats

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on February 27, 2014

U.S. This week, President Obama said that he would call on Congress to appropriate as much as $300 billion for repairs and upgrades to the nation’s aging roads and railways. Conspicuously absent from that discussion was any mention of ports and inland waterways.

Shippers will be squeezed by Cape Town deviance

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on July 23, 2013

The Suez is important not only to the Asia-North Europe/Med trade but also to growing volumes of Asia cargo heading for the US East Coast. Drewry Maritime Research compiled a report last week on what the impact on the lines would be if the East-West waterway were blocked.

Great Offshore becomes India’s first full member of International Salvage Union

Posted to Great Offshore becomes India’s first full member of International Salvage Union (by Joseph Fonseca) on June 6, 2012

India has finally got their own internationally recognized and fully established salvage company which can now operate beyond the country’s borders and bid for major contracts all over the world that are open only to members of International Salvage Union.

Navigating a Curious Course

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on January 25, 2012

Last week, I insisted that the story line for the tragic Costa Concordia grounding would change numerous times before the matter was ultimately adjudicated. That said and still being true, I don’t think anyone should be surprised at the newest…

Alfred Thayer Mahan

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on September 16, 2011

Alfred Thayer Mahan (1840-1914) was born at West Point, where his father was an instructor. After graduating with distinction from the US Naval Academy in 1859, he served blockade duty on a number of warships during the Civil War. Mahan was promoted at…

Cruise of the Corwin

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 10, 2011

The United States Revenue Cutter (USRC) Thomas Corwin was built in Portland, Oregon in 1876, becoming the first federal government vessel built in the state. She was finished and commissioned in San Francisco in 1877. San Francisco remained her homeport for her entire period of government service.

Private security guards allowed on Indian ships

Posted to Private security guards allowed on Indian ships (by Joseph Fonseca) on May 25, 2011

With the International Maritime Organization (IMO) having approved a Maritime Safety Committee (MCA) circular providing interim guidance on the use of privately contracted armed security guards on board ships in the high risk piracy area, Dr. S. B.

Fall line

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 25, 2011

The fall line is a geologic boundary between two surface layers of earth with different levels. The levels between the two layers are sufficiently different that a river flowing from the higher level to the lower level creates a waterfall. The…

Indian Budget gives big Boost to coastal shipping

Posted to Indian Budget gives big Boost to coastal shipping (by Joseph Fonseca) on March 7, 2011

Like the curate’s egg, the Indian fiscal 2012 budget is good in parts. Various players of the maritime sector have expressed both optimism and disappointment over various aspects of the budget pertaining to seaports and the efficient, safe and cost-effective movement of freight.

Maritime Legislative Report Card:

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on January 19, 2011

It wasn’t too long ago that a former key official in the previous administration advised me that the problem with today’s version of the federal government and legislative arms isn’t the lack of passion to get the job done right. Instead, I was told…

Perihelion

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 4, 2011

The whoosh you experienced at about 1900 UTC on Monday, January 3, 2011 was the sun passing by on its closest approach to the Earth – a mere 91,402,505 miles away. This recurs every year, often at night when it can’t be observed. The date and…

Carriers warn Vale's big bulkers will dampen rates

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on December 9, 2010

The dry bulk shipping business is going through a tough time. It is an incredible 80 percent down on the market peak in May 2008, and rates have led carrier operators on a wild and volatile ride ever since. The industry is currently oversupplied with bulk carriers…

Los Angeles and Gambol Industries Get Closer to the Rocks

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 2, 2010

Bond ratings for the Port of Los Angeles might just be getting a downgrade within the next year, and by extension, so will those for Long Beach. The Gambol Industries shipyard controversy will be the reason. Gambol's objections center on cost…

Vizhinjam to become major transshipment port in S. India

Posted to Vizhinjam to become major transshipment port in S. India (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 29, 2010

Vizhinjam, a port located near the Southern tip of India and close to the international shipping route is being developed into a major transshipment port. Once completed it is expected to attract annually over 10,000 ships that is half the number that pass through the Suez Canal.

GlobalMET Charts a new course at India chapter

Posted to GlobalMET Charts a new course at India chapter (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 22, 2010

With focus on charting a new course the Global Maritime Education & Training Association (GlobalMET), which boasts of 106 members based in 35 economies, held its annual conference in Mumbai on 20 November 2010. Held jointly with the Nautical…

Back from the (almost) dead

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 5, 2010

The requirement for scanning of 100% of maritime shipping containers in overseas ports prior to loading on a ship bound for the United States was enacted into federal law (with various caveats) by the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007.

Petrobras Expands CENPES Research Center

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on October 12, 2010

With the expansion the complex on Fundão Island will occupy more than 300 thousand m² making it one of the largest centers of applied research in the world. There will be various laboratories designed to meet the technological demands of Petrobras’ business areas…

One Small Step for the TWIC Program?

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on September 30, 2010

Last week the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) updated its list of TWIC Readers that have successfully completed the Initial Capability Evaluation (ICE) to include an additional hand-held reader. This brings the total of portable…

Plug-in Shore Power

Posted to Marine Propulsion Report (by Keith Henderson) on September 18, 2010

A major factor slowing down the more widespread use of plug-in shore power to permit cold ironing is the lack of a safe, troublesome and easy to use standard for the shore to ship connector. Further complicating the problem is the abundance…

Move to give STCW a slant on learning

Posted to Move to give STCW a slant on learning (by Joseph Fonseca) on September 6, 2010

With near misses and accidents on the rise while at sea, the focus has with intensity come to rest on training and STCW conventions. A lot of soul searching and introspection is taking place with a section of trainers coming to the conclusion…
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