28557 members and growing – the largest networking group in the maritime industry!

LoginJoin

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

The U.S. Department of Transportation

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on May 8, 2013

Fully 6 months after winning a second term in office, President Obama has (finally) nominated a candidate for U.S. Secretary of Transportation to replace outgoing DOT Chief Ray LaHood. On April 29th, Anthony Foxx, the Mayor of Charlotte, N.C., was tapped for the role.

Picton Castle

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 3, 2013

The barque Picton Castle is a commercial sail training vessel homeported in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia and registered in the Cook Islands. It was built in Swansea, Wales in 1928 as a motorized fishing trawler and named for the local Welsh castle.

Market expectations from DNV and GL merger

Posted to Market expectations from DNV and GL merger (by Joseph Fonseca) on January 23, 2013

The recent announcement of the merger of the two classification societies Germanischer Lloyd (GL) and Det Norske Veritas (DNV) seems to have caused an unsettling effect on shipping companies, classification societiesand others related organizations.

dynamic responses determine stability at sea

Posted to for those in motion on the ocean (by Peter Ebbutt) on December 19, 2012

Stabilicube…tracks changes in stability as waves sweep thru, winds gust, liquids transfer via open cross connects, tanks slosh, cargo shifts, water is still trapped on deck, towline angles and tensions change. Stabilicube takes the guess work out of operations at sea.

China looks inwards as export demand remains weak

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on October 25, 2012

China became known as the world’s factory by offering manufacturing costs that could not be matched by the developed nations. Its wages paid to uneducated rural migrant labour were a fraction of the mostly unionized pay required in the West, and land for factories was plentiful and cheap.

The trans-Pacific group sets teeth on edge again

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on August 30, 2012

Hackles are rising over the 15-member “discussion” group, the Transpacific Stabilization Agreement, and its “discussion” that has led to an “adjustment” (when any authority speaks of an “adjustment”, you can be darn sure the price is going up) of the bunker charge of $17 per FEU to the West Coast…

Job Shadowing: its Suitability as a Training and Familiarization Technique

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on October 19, 2011

Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog by following the blog.Share this blog post.Follow me on Twitter.Job Shadowing: its…

Yangtze shipping left high and dry

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on January 25, 2012

The Year of the Dragon begins now, represented in the Chinese zodiac by the Water Dragon. There is some irony in that, because the worst drought in 50 years has forced Chinese maritime authorities to close the Yangtze River above the port of Wuhan, more than 600 miles upriver from Shanghai.

Skuld takes the Indian offshore by storm

Posted to Skuld takes the Indian offshore by storm (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 23, 2011

Skuld has made a clean sweep of the Indian offshore opportunities by being the only player to provide innovative insurance and risk management solution. It is Skuld’s unique and exclusive offer covering contractual liabilities along with other…

China factories being pushed over the edge

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on November 8, 2011

We asked the question last week that retailers in the US and Europe must surely be ready to put in last minute orders to restock their inventories before the Christmas buying season starts in earnest. Yesterday we received the answer, from the US, at least.

When is a Hong Kong manufacturer not a Hong Kong manufacturer?

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on October 4, 2011

The Hong Kong Toys Manufacturers Association was this week complaining that falling orders from the European Union and the US will leave factory owners facing a bleak Christmas. The expectation is that toy exports will be down about 25 percent this year…

Salish Sea

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 4, 2011

The Salish Sea extends from the southern end of Puget Sound, near Olympia, Washington, north through Puget Sound and the Strait of Georgia to Desolation Sound, and west to where the Strait of Juan de Fuca meets the Pacific Ocean. Its name derives…

Proposed USCG STCW Regulations Impact Maritime Security

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on September 29, 2011

Proposed US Coast Guard regulations to implement the STCW Convention will, if adopted, have both direct and indirect impacts on maritime transportation security programs. That said, implementation of the maritime-security-specific STCW amendments…

Oil & Gas deep exploitation and All sea sources of Renewable energy production with the same technology

Posted to TKS Greening Oceans (by Tarkovacs Stefan) on September 15, 2011

This starting century let come a new deal between the earth and human kind, between nations, between people and their needs. This new time needs new ideas and new behaviour, particularly from industrialists and investors to help that world continue to grow up without destroying itself.

On-Line exams for Certificates of Competency

Posted to On-Line exams for Certificates of Competency (by Joseph Fonseca) on August 15, 2011

As the clamor for holding examinations for certificates of competency (COC) on-line took on a strident pitch, head honchos and leading lights of the maritime trade especially from manning agents, training institutes, ship owners, classification…

Proposed Indian Ports Bill could get shelved

Posted to Proposed Indian Ports Bill could get shelved (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 6, 2011

The Government of India proposal to come out with the Indian Ports Bill for replacing the extant Indian Port Act, 1908 and the Major Port Trusts Act, 1963 in order to meet the current operational and developmental requirements of the Indian Ports sector.

Sikorsky HH-52 Seaguard Helicopter

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 1, 2011

The first modern amphibious helicopter capable of regular rescue operations in the offshore marine environment was the Sikorsky HH-52A Seaguard. This aircraft could cruise at 98 miles per hour, had a range of 474 miles, and could carry ten passengers in addition to a crew of two.

China factories slowly climbing the value chain

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on June 8, 2011

It may seem we harp on about China’s changing manufacturing industry, but that's because of its direct impact on export ocean cargo and the import of raw materials. All the stuff we consume has to be made somewhere, and the mainland has pretty much cornered the manufacturing market.

Biofouling

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 8, 2011

Biofouling is the accumulation of microorganisms, algae, plants, and/or animals on wetted surfaces, particularly the hulls of ships. This became a significant problem as European mariners started making extended sea voyages in the late fifteenth century.

Indian ship owners demand Armed Guards on ships

Posted to Indian ship owners demand Armed Guards on ships (by Joseph Fonseca) on April 6, 2011

With piracy taking a turn for the worse, Indian ship owners have upped their ante making a desperate bid for the ultimate step of using armed guards on board the vessel. Despite the Naval authorities and major manning companies frowning on such measures…