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Thursday, July 18, 2019

Sea lily

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 13, 2015

The sea lily (Bourgueticrinida) is an order of marine animals referred to as crinoids. They are typically found in deep ocean waters (to a depth of about 18,000 feet). In their adult form, they are attached to the sea floor by means of a stalk.

Marine Engineers’ Convention on overcoming economic meltdown

Posted to Marine Engineers’ Convention on overcoming economic meltdown (by Joseph Fonseca) on September 24, 2012

It is incredible that the two-day 26th National Convention of Marine Engineers finally took place in Mumbai, (Navi Mumbai to be exact) over the past weekend on 22 and 23 September 2012. It is in fact the first time in several years that Mumbai was selected as the venue of this convention.

Indian Navy and Coast Guard to the rescue of the Indian Administration?

Posted to Indian Navy and Coast Guard to the rescue of the Indian Administration? (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 16, 2012

The Government of India is mulling over the idea of handing over the statutory functions of the Indian Administration (Directorate General of Shipping) to the Indian Navy and the Coast Guard. As a beginning, the two agencies are likely to begin…

Evergreen shrugs off conservative cloak

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on April 26, 2012

Working out supply and demand is a tricky business at the best of times, so trying to predict the container shipping market a year or two in advance is as good as sucking a thumb and writing down the first thing that comes to mind. Looking at an Alphaliner chart of current vs ordered ships…

New Siberian Islands

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 6, 2015

The archipelago called the New Siberian Islands is not new, having existed for eons and containing fossils from the Late Pleistocene (over 100,000 years ago) and probably earlier. Bedrock on the islands is significantly older. The archipelago is comprised of three groups of islands.

Teak

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 20, 2014

Teak is the common name for the Tectona grandis, a member of the verbena family native to the hardwood forests of India, Burma (Myanmar), Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia. It is a large deciduous tree, growing to a height of 130 feet, with gray and grayish brown branches.

The new normal for the Jones Act -- big profits?

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 30, 2013

There’s been a new twist to the Jones Act, sending another signal that it’s time for change. Money crunchers are making a huge profit from the artificial market in the domestic oil trade. ExxonMobil has chartered the Overseas Cascade at $110…

Improving the Utility of Multiple Choice Questions in Maritime Training

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on April 15, 2013

Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog by following the blog.Maritime Mentoring: International Maritime Mentoring Community - Find a Mentor…

Using Multiple Choice Tests in Maritime Training Assessments

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on March 18, 2013

Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog by following the blog.Maritime Mentoring: International Maritime Mentoring Community - Find a Mentor…

Happy Holidays (?) from the West Coast

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on December 5, 2012

It’s that time of year again. Chestnuts roasting on an open fire, mistletoe over the front door and great expectations or the holiday season to come. What’s not to like? On the other hand, and with the strike by clerical workers at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach…

Hong Kong port’s days are numbered

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on November 28, 2012

Way back in the mists of 2004, the government of Hong Kong released its Port Masterplan: 2020. The plan, compiled by consultants GHK, took a comprehensive look at the port and its needs over the next couple of decades. Naturally the government watered down the first draft…

Arun Sharma takes over IRS

Posted to Arun Sharma takes over IRS (by Joseph Fonseca) on February 1, 2012

Arun Sharma assumed charge as “Chairman and Managing Director” of the Indian Register of Shipping (IRS) this morning having taken over from  Capt J. C. Anand who founded and nurtured the organization raising it to occupy a significant place in the Maritime history of independent India.

Yangtze shipping left high and dry

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on January 25, 2012

The Year of the Dragon begins now, represented in the Chinese zodiac by the Water Dragon. There is some irony in that, because the worst drought in 50 years has forced Chinese maritime authorities to close the Yangtze River above the port of Wuhan, more than 600 miles upriver from Shanghai.

Henry Hudson

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 22, 2011

Little is known of Henry Hudson prior to 1607, when he was hired by the Muscovy Company of the Kingdom of England to find a northern route to the Far East. He and a crew of ten sailed on the 80-ton Hopewell. They reached the east coast of Greenland and traveled north to the ice pack.

Northland

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 25, 2011

The US Coast Guard Cutter (USCGC) NORTHLAND (WPG-49) was an ice-strengthened cruising gunboat with an illustrious career. It was built by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Corporation and launched in 1927. Originally fitted with auxiliary sails…

Training shortfall

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 21, 2011

The IMO, major maritime administrations, and major ship owners and operators are rushing headlong into the adoption of new technology. The most visible element of the new technology is e-navigation, but the trend also includes new engineering technologies such as low-emission engines…

Security cost is the legacy of September 11

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on September 7, 2011

On a bright September morning in New York 10 years ago, transportation’s age of innocence came to a crashing end. From that point on, the efficient transport of passengers and cargo from country to country vanished, replaced by costly and cumbersome security systems that continue to frustrate.

USS Princeton

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 30, 2011

The frigate USS Princeton, launched in 1843, was named after Princeton, New Jersey, site of an American victory during the Revolutionary War. The city was also the home of the prominent Stockton family, avid supporters of the project to build the vessel.

Pain of China factories to spread along supply chain

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on August 18, 2011

“Forget raising factory gate prices; manufacturers are lucky if they have new orders,” said a China cap making factory executive in a South China Morning Post report on how exporters were being squeezed. The strengthening yuan and slowing demand…

Rotterdam and Mumbai agree for mutual cooperation

Posted to Rotterdam and Mumbai agree to mutually cooperate (by Joseph Fonseca) on February 16, 2011

Yet another port has been positioned to serve as the European gateway for shipments to and from Mumbai. This time on 10 February the representatives of the city port of Rotterdam visited Mumbai and met those of the city port of Mumbai and resolved…
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