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Thursday, July 18, 2019

Zeroing in on Zukunft:

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on February 3, 2015

Long Beach, CA: Less than 12 hours after the New England Patriots’ late game heroics stunned the Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl XLIX, U.S. Coast Guard Commandant Admiral Paul Zukunft found himself facing a standing room only audience of Passenger Vessel Association (PVA) delegates…

HMS Endeavour

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 2, 2014

The bark HMS Endeavour was built in 1764 as the collier Earl of Pembroke. A type known locally as a Whitby Cat, it had a broad, flat bow, a square stern, a long box-like body with a deep hold, and a flat bottom. Originally ship-rigged, it was…

Seamanship : Alive and Well or Dead and Gone?

Posted to Madden Maritime (by Richard Madden) on August 31, 2014

What contributes more to safety? Seamanship and common sense or the regulations and management systems that we currently use? Captain Charis Kanellopoulos argues that seamanship onboard modern merchant vessels is almost extinct, leading to an increase in incidents across the industry.

Cape Cod Canal

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 15, 2014

The Cape Cod Canal is a seven-mile long sea level canal connecting Cape Cod Bay to the north with Buzzards Bay to the south. Maintained by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), it has a minimum channel width of 480 feet and an authorized depth of 32 feet at mean low water.

Excursion vessels in polar waters

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 11, 2014

The world was recently witness to a multi-national effort to rescue the Russian excursion vessel Akademik Shokalskiy after it was beset in wind-driven ice off the coast of Antarctica. The French supply vessel L’Astrolabe turned back from its relief effort.

Elisha Kane

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 3, 2013

Elisha Kent Kane (1820-1857) was born in Philadelphia and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1842. Joining the United States Navy as a medical officer, he served in the China Commercial Treaty mission of 1844, in the Africa Squadron…

Barents Sea

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 21, 2013

The Barents Sea is named for the Dutch navigator, cartographer, and explorer Willem Barents, who mapped the area during expeditions in the late 1500’s. Historically, the Russians referred to it as the Sea of Murmans. It is located north of eastern Norway and western Russia.

It’s hunky dory on maritime manning & training front

Posted to It’s hunky dory on maritime manning & training front (by Joseph Fonseca) on February 11, 2013

Encouraging updates from the Manning and Training sector in India present a healthy picture of the industry. It appears that the future is set to get brighter as was revealed in a panel discussion held under the aegis of the Company of Master Mariners of India.

India’s port expansion and capacity upgrading summit

Posted to India’s port expansion and capacity upgrading summit (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 26, 2012

Lnoppen, better known as the “corridor of insight” organized their 3 India Port Expansion & Capacity Upgrading Summit last week on 22 and 23 November, 2012 in Mumbai. The Chairman of the conference Anand V. Sharma, Managing Director of Mantrana…

Drive to cut costs may push shipping into the clouds

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on September 21, 2012

Maersk Line recently signed a US$150 million cloud computing deal with HP. In the five-year agreement, the Danish carrier will use HP’s cloud-enabled data centers and HP Workplace Services in what is known as an “instant-on enterprise”. Yes, that made no sense to me, either.

Albatross

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 14, 2012

The albatross is the largest of all birds in terms of wingspan (up to 12 feet). It can be found soaring above all ocean waters of the Southern Hemisphere and above the North Pacific. It is largely absent from the North Atlantic, probably due to loss of habitat.

Indian Navy and Coast Guard to the rescue of the Indian Administration?

Posted to Indian Navy and Coast Guard to the rescue of the Indian Administration? (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 16, 2012

The Government of India is mulling over the idea of handing over the statutory functions of the Indian Administration (Directorate General of Shipping) to the Indian Navy and the Coast Guard. As a beginning, the two agencies are likely to begin…

TSA Announces TWIC Extension Option

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on June 18, 2012

On June 15, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) TWIC website announced a forthcoming option for many holders of the Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC) to extend the expiration date of their TWICs pending implementation…

Great Offshore becomes India’s first full member of International Salvage Union

Posted to Great Offshore becomes India’s first full member of International Salvage Union (by Joseph Fonseca) on June 6, 2012

India has finally got their own internationally recognized and fully established salvage company which can now operate beyond the country’s borders and bid for major contracts all over the world that are open only to members of International Salvage Union.

Chinese research icebreaker Xue Long

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 25, 2012

The Xue Long (Snow Dragon) is the premier polar vessel of the People’s Republic of China. It was built in the Ukraine in 1993 and modified upon its acquisition by China in 1994. Its major function is to serve as a resupply vessel and scientific research platform in the Antarctic and the Arctic.

BC Ferries - a Case Study in Blended Maritime Assessment - Part 1

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on April 2, 2012

Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog by following the blog.Share this blog post.Follow me on Twitter.IntroductionAssessment in the maritime industry is a huge subject.

Other experimental ironclads

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 23, 2012

When the Union Navy learned that the Confederate Navy was building an iron-clad warship to threaten the wooden-hulled blockade fleet, it launched a crash project to build its own iron-clad warships. Of the 17 proposals submitted, the Union Navy selected three for construction.

Results of the January 2012 NMSAC Meeting – Part III

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on February 27, 2012

In two previous posts, I covered the Meeting’s first and second sessions, which had briefings and discussions on requirements for vessel guards while in port, Maritime Transportation Security Act (MTSA)/Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) Harmonization…

Arun Sharma takes over IRS

Posted to Arun Sharma takes over IRS (by Joseph Fonseca) on February 1, 2012

Arun Sharma assumed charge as “Chairman and Managing Director” of the Indian Register of Shipping (IRS) this morning having taken over from  Capt J. C. Anand who founded and nurtured the organization raising it to occupy a significant place in the Maritime history of independent India.

Yangtze shipping left high and dry

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on January 25, 2012

The Year of the Dragon begins now, represented in the Chinese zodiac by the Water Dragon. There is some irony in that, because the worst drought in 50 years has forced Chinese maritime authorities to close the Yangtze River above the port of Wuhan, more than 600 miles upriver from Shanghai.