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Monday, August 26, 2019

India’s port expansion and capacity upgrading summit

Posted to India’s port expansion and capacity upgrading summit (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 26, 2012

Lnoppen, better known as the “corridor of insight” organized their 3 India Port Expansion & Capacity Upgrading Summit last week on 22 and 23 November, 2012 in Mumbai. The Chairman of the conference Anand V. Sharma, Managing Director of Mantrana…

TSA Announces TWIC Extension Option

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on June 18, 2012

On June 15, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) TWIC website announced a forthcoming option for many holders of the Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC) to extend the expiration date of their TWICs pending implementation…

What have we learned from the Titanic casualty?

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 13, 2012

Late on the night of April 14, 1912, the “unsinkable” passenger ship RMS Titanic, on its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York struck an iceberg. It sank about three hours later, at about 2:20 a.m. on April 15, 1912. Of the 2,224 persons on board, 1,514 lost their lives.

Great White Fleet

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 30, 2012

Starting in about 1890, the United States Navy began a rebuilding program to replace its antiquated fleet, most of which then dated from the Civil War. It handily won the naval conflicts of the Spanish-American War, but that was against a nation with an even more antiquated fleet.

Pensacola

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 9, 2011

Pensacola is the westernmost city in Florida, nearly extending into Alabama. It is the homeport for a number of fishing vessels and small passenger vessels. One of its claims to fame is that it is the site of the first European settlement in…

Henry Hudson

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 22, 2011

Little is known of Henry Hudson prior to 1607, when he was hired by the Muscovy Company of the Kingdom of England to find a northern route to the Far East. He and a crew of ten sailed on the 80-ton Hopewell. They reached the east coast of Greenland and traveled north to the ice pack.

The Train Wreck at DOT

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on October 19, 2011

It has been an interesting autumn at the U.S. Maritime Administration and for its Department of Transportation parent, as well. Little in the way of good news is to be had for anyone; much less the U.S. domestic waterfront itself. The abrupt…

USS Princeton

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 30, 2011

The frigate USS Princeton, launched in 1843, was named after Princeton, New Jersey, site of an American victory during the Revolutionary War. The city was also the home of the prominent Stockton family, avid supporters of the project to build the vessel.

Georg Wilhelm Steller

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 5, 2011

Georg Wilhelm Steller (1709-1746) was a naturalist and zoologist, noted for being the first European to set foot in what is now Alaska and for describing and documenting some of the unique animal life of the region. He was born in Windsheim, Bavaria and studied at the University of Wittenberg.

Nikumaroro

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 21, 2010

Nikumaroro (previously known as Gardner Island) is a small coral atoll in the central Pacific Ocean situated just south of the Equator and just west of the 180th meridian. It lies in the Phoenix Island Chain and is part of the Republic of Kiribati.

Back from the (almost) dead

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 5, 2010

The requirement for scanning of 100% of maritime shipping containers in overseas ports prior to loading on a ship bound for the United States was enacted into federal law (with various caveats) by the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007.

Manila STCW Amendments Push eLearning Protocols to the Head of the Class

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on July 28, 2010

Easton, MD (Calhoon MEBA School): With the world’s maritime training schemes already groaning under the collective weight of flag state and International requirements, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) last month plowed ahead with promised amendments and additions to the STCW code.

Long Beach Blows a Raspberry at Local Politicians

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on July 15, 2010

The principle of "One hand washing the other" might apply to Washington bureaucrats and politicians, but Long Beach port authorities are having none of it. The angst over the LB city council demanding an extra dollop of cash from the port for the Tidelands fund continues…

Deepwater Horizon Questions

Posted to MarineNews Notes (by Raina Clark) on May 7, 2010

In this U.S. Navy photo, contracted fishing vessels, Mary and Jace and Gulf Rambler, pull an oil boom during a controlled burn in the Gulf of Mexico, May 5. The controlled burn was conducted in partnership with the U.S. Coast Guard, BP and other…

USCG Districts

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 6, 2010

The US Coast Guard adopted the concept of geographic districts when it absorbed the US Lighthouse Service in 1939. Previously, it had no formal segmentation of its chain of command based on geography. Rather, the chain of command was grouped around function.

Trireme - dreadnaught of the ancient Mediterranean

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 5, 2010

The trireme was utilized as a warship in the Mediterranean Sea from the 7th century BC until the fall of the Roman Republic at about the commencement of the Christian era. No other warship design has survived in service for a comparable period. It was truly the dominant battleship of its day.

Piracy approach a failure, say Hong Kong shipowners

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on January 19, 2010

The Hong Kong Shipowners’ Association (HKSOA) has called for governments to throw out the current response to pirates menacing ships off the Horn of Africa, accusing the international community of tolerating piracy instead of eliminating attacks.

Marine protected areas

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 8, 2010

Marine protected area (MPA) is a fluid term with a range of possible meanings. For the most part, it is an area of the marine environment where human activity is regulated for the purpose of conserving and managing natural and cultural marine resources.

Maritime museum brings small cheer to New Year

Posted to On the waterfront (by Emma-Jane Batey) on December 31, 2009

As we stand in the last day of 2009 and look forward to a better, brighter 2010, let’s share a good news story from the maritime world. Having posted about all manner of dramatic, negative stories ranging from pirates to drugs hauls to the huge impact of the tiny barnacle…