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Sunday, August 18, 2019

Zeroing in on Zukunft:

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on February 3, 2015

Long Beach, CA: Less than 12 hours after the New England Patriots’ late game heroics stunned the Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl XLIX, U.S. Coast Guard Commandant Admiral Paul Zukunft found himself facing a standing room only audience of Passenger Vessel Association (PVA) delegates…

Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy in Turkey

Posted to Global Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy (by Vietnam Inspection Company) on July 30, 2014

Turkey Inspection in Turkey/ Expediting/ Surveillance/ Inspector/Expediter/  Quality control/ Testing/ Certificate/ Marine Surveyors/Superintendent P&I Correspondents Insured cargo, marine investigation & adjusting in Turkey, Countries. Dr Capt.

Taiping Island

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 24, 2014

The Spratly Islands are a group of islets, cays, atolls, and coral reefs located in the southern portion of the South China Sea. Taiping Island (also called Itu Aba Island) is the largest of these islets and the only one with fresh water springs.

"What is the point of testing in Maritime Training"? Very few people know the correct answer to this question. This is a problem.

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on February 24, 2014

Maritime Training: The full library of maritime training articles can be found here.Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog…

Cocos (Keeling) Islands

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 15, 2013

The island group, consisting of two atolls and about 27 coral islands, was stumbled upon by Captain William Keeling (1578-1620) of the East Indiaman Susanna. In 1609, he was returning to England from the East India Company’s trading post on Java.

Fracking could be the new future for some ports

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on April 28, 2013

Northwest and as the door on a coal terminal closes, another opens for hydraulic fracturing (fracking). Gray’s Harbor, normally associated with autos and breakbulk, is eyeing a huge bonanza in the form of crude-by-rail. The stuff will probably come from the fields…

CG 36500

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 19, 2013

The US Coast Guard motor lifeboat 36500 is the only one of the many hundreds that were built between the 1930s and the 1950s to be placed on the National Register of Historic Places. On 18 February 1952, during a severe winter storm off Cape Cod…

India’s port expansion and capacity upgrading summit

Posted to India’s port expansion and capacity upgrading summit (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 26, 2012

Lnoppen, better known as the “corridor of insight” organized their 3 India Port Expansion & Capacity Upgrading Summit last week on 22 and 23 November, 2012 in Mumbai. The Chairman of the conference Anand V. Sharma, Managing Director of Mantrana…

What have we learned from the Titanic casualty?

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 13, 2012

Late on the night of April 14, 1912, the “unsinkable” passenger ship RMS Titanic, on its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York struck an iceberg. It sank about three hours later, at about 2:20 a.m. on April 15, 1912. Of the 2,224 persons on board, 1,514 lost their lives.

Pensacola

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 9, 2011

Pensacola is the westernmost city in Florida, nearly extending into Alabama. It is the homeport for a number of fishing vessels and small passenger vessels. One of its claims to fame is that it is the site of the first European settlement in…

The Train Wreck at DOT

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on October 19, 2011

It has been an interesting autumn at the U.S. Maritime Administration and for its Department of Transportation parent, as well. Little in the way of good news is to be had for anyone; much less the U.S. domestic waterfront itself. The abrupt…

Georg Wilhelm Steller

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 5, 2011

Georg Wilhelm Steller (1709-1746) was a naturalist and zoologist, noted for being the first European to set foot in what is now Alaska and for describing and documenting some of the unique animal life of the region. He was born in Windsheim, Bavaria and studied at the University of Wittenberg.

Nikumaroro

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 21, 2010

Nikumaroro (previously known as Gardner Island) is a small coral atoll in the central Pacific Ocean situated just south of the Equator and just west of the 180th meridian. It lies in the Phoenix Island Chain and is part of the Republic of Kiribati.

Back from the (almost) dead

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 5, 2010

The requirement for scanning of 100% of maritime shipping containers in overseas ports prior to loading on a ship bound for the United States was enacted into federal law (with various caveats) by the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007.

USCG Districts

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 6, 2010

The US Coast Guard adopted the concept of geographic districts when it absorbed the US Lighthouse Service in 1939. Previously, it had no formal segmentation of its chain of command based on geography. Rather, the chain of command was grouped around function.

Trireme - dreadnaught of the ancient Mediterranean

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 5, 2010

The trireme was utilized as a warship in the Mediterranean Sea from the 7th century BC until the fall of the Roman Republic at about the commencement of the Christian era. No other warship design has survived in service for a comparable period. It was truly the dominant battleship of its day.