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Sunday, January 26, 2020

Near Misses: Saving Ourselves One Miss at a Time......

Posted to Madden Maritime (by Richard Madden) on October 18, 2014

"Near-miss : A sequence of events and/or conditions that could have resulted in loss. This loss was prevented only by a fortuitous break in the chain of events and/or conditions. Near-miss reporting and investigating is something that mariners have been doing for many years now.

Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy in Saudi Arabia

Posted to Global Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy (by Vietnam Inspection Company) on July 30, 2014

Saudi Arabia Inspection in   Saudi Arabia/ Expediting/ Surveillance/ Inspector/Expediter/  Quality control/ Testing/ Certificate/ Marine Surveyors/Superintendent P&I Correspondents Insured cargo, marine investigation & adjusting in   Saudi Arabia, Countries. Dr Capt.

Austro-Hungarian North Pole Expedition

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 22, 2013

Well into the nineteenth century, many believed that the region of the North Pole was open water, surrounded by floating ice. If one could only locate an opening in the ice, it would be possible to sail from the temperate region to the North Pole and possibly out the other side.

Less With Less

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on October 7, 2013

The annual meeting of the National Waterways Conference, held in the last week of September at Savannah, GA, held little in terms of certainty for attendees. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Major General Michael Walsh told those present…

Transhipment business model no good for Hong Kong

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on May 7, 2013

Some ports lend themselves, via geographic location or strategy, to transshipment. Singapore, for instance, had a throughput of 31.6 million TEUs in 2012, but more than 90 percent was comprised of containers in transit. Geographically, Singapore…

China looks inwards as export demand remains weak

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on October 25, 2012

China became known as the world’s factory by offering manufacturing costs that could not be matched by the developed nations. Its wages paid to uneducated rural migrant labour were a fraction of the mostly unionized pay required in the West, and land for factories was plentiful and cheap.