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Sunday, September 15, 2019

Jack Ward (1553-1622)

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 11, 2011

Born in Faversham, Kent in about 1553, Jack Ward (or Birdy) spent his youth in the fisheries trade. Following the defeat of the Spanish Armada, he participated in privateering, an activity encouraged by Queen Elizabeth. With the accession of James I in 1603, Letters of Marque were no longer issued.

Maritime Legislative Report Card:

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on January 19, 2011

It wasn’t too long ago that a former key official in the previous administration advised me that the problem with today’s version of the federal government and legislative arms isn’t the lack of passion to get the job done right. Instead, I was told…

Perihelion

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 4, 2011

The whoosh you experienced at about 1900 UTC on Monday, January 3, 2011 was the sun passing by on its closest approach to the Earth – a mere 91,402,505 miles away. This recurs every year, often at night when it can’t be observed. The date and…

Seattle Shipyard Takeover is a Pointer for 2011

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 30, 2010

Speculation on the forthcoming year has become remarkably sparse in the last couple of years because of the tumultuous events in liner shipping and uncertainty over the international economic situation. But a year-end port-related takeover is…

Nikumaroro

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 21, 2010

Nikumaroro (previously known as Gardner Island) is a small coral atoll in the central Pacific Ocean situated just south of the Equator and just west of the 180th meridian. It lies in the Phoenix Island Chain and is part of the Republic of Kiribati.

U.S. Coast Guard: Cherry-Picking is Not an Option

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on September 1, 2010

Responding directly to our August 10th article entitled, “STCW Compliance: will we or won’t we,” the U.S. Coast Guard’s Director of National and International Standards has affirmed the U.S. position on STCW compliance, especially as it relates…

More Detail on Port Investment Ratings

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on August 12, 2010

More details have become available about Moody's rating agency's take on the soundness of 18 US ports plus two intermodal corridors. "Negative credit pressures remain as ports recover from revenue and cargo losses that fell to levels well below earlier expectations…

Long Beach Blows a Raspberry at Local Politicians

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on July 15, 2010

The principle of "One hand washing the other" might apply to Washington bureaucrats and politicians, but Long Beach port authorities are having none of it. The angst over the LB city council demanding an extra dollop of cash from the port for the Tidelands fund continues…

Issues associated with the use of low viscosity distillates

Posted to Issues associated with the use of low viscosity distillates (by Gregory Trauthwein) on January 14, 2010

1.  Lubricity issues of distillates versus residual fuels. 2.  Suitability of existing equipment for use with distillate fuels. 3.  Operational safety when using distillates in large marine auxiliary and propulsion boilers. Lubricity concerns…

Unique Corus Tubes for Tupi Project

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on July 9, 2010

Corus Tubes has successfully manufactured 118km of 457mm x 31.75mm Grade X65 sour linepipe for the Petrobras Tupi project. This linepipe is designed to operate in Brazil’s Santos Basin at a depth of 2200m, and is thickest 18” UOE pipe manufactured to date.

Limitation of Liability Act of 1851

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 6, 2010

The Limitation of Liability Act, now located at 46 U.S. Code sections 30501-30512, was adopted to provide shipowners a measure of protection if their ships were to cause injury or damage to others in cases where the shipowners have no privity or knowledge relative to the cause of the incident.

Politicians Squawk over Pacific Antitrust Immunity

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on June 17, 2010

The Transpacific Stabilization Agreement, the carriers' carrier, is like a bus. Never there when you need one and then three press releases come along at the same time. Right now is just the moment for a news bulletin to be issued, to give another angle to the thorny topic of antitrust immunity.

Thames Barrier

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 8, 2010

The Thames Barrier is a 1,710-foot wide movable flood control barrier across the River Thames just downstream from central London. After a ten-year construction period, it was officially opened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II on May 8, 1984.

USCG Districts

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 6, 2010

The US Coast Guard adopted the concept of geographic districts when it absorbed the US Lighthouse Service in 1939. Previously, it had no formal segmentation of its chain of command based on geography. Rather, the chain of command was grouped around function.

US Short Sea Shipping

Posted to US Short Sea Shipping (by Bruce L. Perri) on March 18, 2010

US highway traffic continues to increase particularly in the urban areas of the northeast, eastern central, gulf and the LA to Seattle corridor. In addition to greatly increased risks in everyday commuting, the impact on the environment continues to rise.

Trireme - dreadnaught of the ancient Mediterranean

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 5, 2010

The trireme was utilized as a warship in the Mediterranean Sea from the 7th century BC until the fall of the Roman Republic at about the commencement of the Christian era. No other warship design has survived in service for a comparable period. It was truly the dominant battleship of its day.

Economic Analysis of Offshore Marine Industry Could Sway Policymakers

Posted to Gulf Coast Maritime (by Matt Gresham) on March 1, 2010

From the halls of Congress to the county courthouse, lawmakers and government bureaucrats alike love numbers. They use them in graphs and display them on poster boards so all can see the benefits of the latest program or industry up for debate at any particular time.

Government Contracts Provide Boost For Gulf Coast Shipyards

Posted to Gulf Coast Maritime (by Matt Gresham) on December 23, 2009

Pascagoula, Miss.-based VT Halter Marine and Lockport, La.-based Bollinger Shipyards announced major awards of government contracts in the last week giving both a boost to morale and their bottom line as a rocky 2009 comes to an end. The U.S.