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Wednesday, August 21, 2019

Sea lily

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 13, 2015

The sea lily (Bourgueticrinida) is an order of marine animals referred to as crinoids. They are typically found in deep ocean waters (to a depth of about 18,000 feet). In their adult form, they are attached to the sea floor by means of a stalk.

Zeroing in on Zukunft:

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on February 3, 2015

Long Beach, CA: Less than 12 hours after the New England Patriots’ late game heroics stunned the Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl XLIX, U.S. Coast Guard Commandant Admiral Paul Zukunft found himself facing a standing room only audience of Passenger Vessel Association (PVA) delegates…

Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy in Vietnam

Posted to Global Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy (by Vietnam Inspection Company) on July 29, 2014

Vietnam Inspection in Vietnam/ Expediting/ Surveillance/ Inspector/ Expediter/  Quality control/ Testing/ Certificate/ Marine Surveyors/ Superintendent P&I Correspondents Insured cargo, marine investigation & adjusting in Vietnam, Countries. Dr Capt.

Anglo Eastern’s Indian footprint may see remarkable expansion

Posted to Anglo Eastern’s Indian footprint may see remarkable expansion (by Joseph Fonseca) on March 3, 2014

Anglo Eastern Ship Management Ltd., is intensifying its focus on India and likely to get into a higher growth trajectory soon. This was reveal by Peter Cremers the Chief Executive Officer of Anglo Eastern Group during their two-day annual seminar held in Mumbai last week.

Fort Zeelandia

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 1, 2013

Once the Dutch decided to compete with the Portuguese and the Spanish for maritime commerce with East Asia, they jumped in with both feet. After establishing a base in Batavia (modern-day Jakarta), they focused on trade with China and Japan.

Results of the April 12-13 Meeting of NMSAC - Part 1

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on April 15, 2011

The US Government having been kept in business for another week, the National Maritime Security Advisory Committee (NMSAC) started a two-day meeting on April 12th. The agenda previously discussed was modified such that the day started with the discussion of Seafarer Access Shore Leave Policy…

Prison Ship Martyrs’ Monument

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on September 3, 2013

During the American Revolutionary War, British forces captured thousands of “rebels”. Those in uniform were accorded treatment somewhat akin to prisoner of war status. Those not in uniform, particularly the maritime privateers, were subjected to harsher conditions.

Civil engineers update their report card on ports

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on March 31, 2013

In what is essentially an update of a 2012 report, The American Society of Civil Engineers has awarded a C grade to the nation’s seaports and their efforts to keep up with essential maintenance and improvement. Much of the report I covered in…

Having grossed 200 MT ClassNK focuses on the Indian sub-continent

Posted to Having grossed 200 MT ClassNK focuses on the Indian sub-continent (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 7, 2012

Not wanting to rest on his laurels after ClassNK having outstripped the 200 million gross tons figure by the end of August 2012, Noboru Ueda, Chairman and President of the society has already embarked on a staunch strategy. “We want to seize…

When the North Sea wasn’t

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 3, 2012

The North Sea is a body of water located between Scandinavia, northwest Europe (Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium, and France), and Great Britain (England and Scotland). To the north, it connects with the Norwegian Sea. To the east, through the Skagerrak and Kattegat…

Day of the Seafarer: Support Through Training and Community

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on June 25, 2012

Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog by following the blog.Maritime Mentoring: International Maritime Mentoring Community - Find a Mentor…

Abel Tasman

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 4, 2012

Abel Tasman (1603-1659) was a Dutch merchant and explorer. He is credited with the European discovery of Australia and New Zealand. He joined the Dutch United East India Company (Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie - VOC) in 1633 and was promptly…

Scary stuff from the experts, but 'wait and see' is the best advice

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on April 13, 2012

Container shipping lines, and their bulk carrying counterparts, are being squeezed from both sides of their balance sheets. The top lines are throttled by excess capacity and poor freight rate levels, while the bottom lines are hammered by rising fuel costs.

Great White Fleet

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 30, 2012

Starting in about 1890, the United States Navy began a rebuilding program to replace its antiquated fleet, most of which then dated from the Civil War. It handily won the naval conflicts of the Spanish-American War, but that was against a nation with an even more antiquated fleet.

South China terminals face capacity overhang as demand falters

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on March 15, 2012

South China’s annual throughput was close to 60 million TEUs last year. There is no cluster of ports in the world that can boast that kind of volume, which enabled the province of Guangdong to claim a third of China exports. The rise of manufacturing…

Ports and carriers make huge strides in cutting pollution

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on January 30, 2012

The anti-pollution brigade continues to rule the waves in port planning in California, imposing ever more strict standards every year. A conference/workshop in Long Beach earlier this month shows just how well the industry has done in keeping up with these demands. Long Beach is a prime example.

Henry Hudson

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 22, 2011

Little is known of Henry Hudson prior to 1607, when he was hired by the Muscovy Company of the Kingdom of England to find a northern route to the Far East. He and a crew of ten sailed on the 80-ton Hopewell. They reached the east coast of Greenland and traveled north to the ice pack.

Georg Wilhelm Steller

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 5, 2011

Georg Wilhelm Steller (1709-1746) was a naturalist and zoologist, noted for being the first European to set foot in what is now Alaska and for describing and documenting some of the unique animal life of the region. He was born in Windsheim, Bavaria and studied at the University of Wittenberg.

Anglo Eastern innovate Advance Process Instrumentation Trainer

Posted to Anglo Eastern innovate Advance Process Instrumentation Trainer (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 4, 2011

Since simulators, ship-in-campus and other systems have their limitation for imparting training to marine engineers in some of the advanced areas Anglo Eastern Maritime Training Center has come up with an innovation for imparting training to…

Finding the Right Ship; Eliminating the Wrong Ones…

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on June 1, 2011

The US Coast Guard’s recent release (May 26th) of its 2010 Annual Port State Control Report is an interesting document and a good read. As a broad overview, the report shows “a continued improvement in Flag Administration, recognized organization and vessel performance during 2010…