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Friday, September 20, 2019

LA and Long Beach have little cheer this Christmas

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 22, 2013

Just as has been feared, the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach are now governed by political appointees, city council favorites and no one who has a technical maritime background. Dynamic is hardly the word to describe the commissioners. The…

Rates riding a new record low on Asia-Europe

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on October 5, 2013

Rates on the Asia-Europe trade have fallen to an abysmal level. We are hearing of forwarders securing freight rates of as low as US$900 per container, which is well below any kind of sustainable level as far as shipping lines are concerned.

Drilling vessel Chikyu

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on September 10, 2013

The Japanese deep sea drilling vessel Chikyu is the first riser-equipped drilling vessel in the world designed and built for scientific work. It is capable of drilling in waters of up to 2,500 meters (8,125 feet) in depth. Its primary mission is to drill through the 7…

Why do people make mistakes?

Posted to Marine Propulsion Report (by Keith Henderson) on August 4, 2010

Mistakes cause accidents. That is the inevitable sequence of events and we humans are the people making the mistakes, but why? What are the reasons that people make mistakes? Following on from my earlier blog on accidents and NK’s guidelines how to prevent them…

OGX Continues Positive Exploratory Campaign in Brazil

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on June 30, 2010

OGX Petróleo e Gás, which is the Brazilian O&G company responsible for the largest private sector exploratory campaign in Brazil, recently announced that it had identified two oil-bearing intervals, one in the Aptian section of well 1-OGX-10…

Shipping slump spreads the pain to box makers

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on August 29, 2013

If you think the container shipping business is depressing, try the container making business. A good 20 percent of the 30 million boxes in circulation around the world are more than 20 years old, even though their lifespan should be 15 years.

Shippers will be squeezed by Cape Town deviance

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on July 23, 2013

The Suez is important not only to the Asia-North Europe/Med trade but also to growing volumes of Asia cargo heading for the US East Coast. Drewry Maritime Research compiled a report last week on what the impact on the lines would be if the East-West waterway were blocked.

Marad: Domestic Shipyards Support $36 Billion in GDP

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on July 10, 2013

A recent report issued by, of all people, the DOT’s U.S. Maritime Administration, chronicles the good news emanating from U.S. shipyards, from sea to shining sea. The report arrived in June while I was on brief holiday and I have finally had a chance to sit down and go through it.

Navigating a Curious Course

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on January 25, 2012

Last week, I insisted that the story line for the tragic Costa Concordia grounding would change numerous times before the matter was ultimately adjudicated. That said and still being true, I don’t think anyone should be surprised at the newest…

United States Light House Service

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 11, 2011

One of the first pieces of legislation adopted by the First Congress of the United States in 1789 was a measure providing for the new federal government to assume responsibility for the lighthouses previously erected by the colonial governments.

Private security guards allowed on Indian ships

Posted to Private security guards allowed on Indian ships (by Joseph Fonseca) on May 25, 2011

With the International Maritime Organization (IMO) having approved a Maritime Safety Committee (MCA) circular providing interim guidance on the use of privately contracted armed security guards on board ships in the high risk piracy area, Dr. S. B.

Perihelion

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 4, 2011

The whoosh you experienced at about 1900 UTC on Monday, January 3, 2011 was the sun passing by on its closest approach to the Earth – a mere 91,402,505 miles away. This recurs every year, often at night when it can’t be observed. The date and…

Carriers warn Vale's big bulkers will dampen rates

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on December 9, 2010

The dry bulk shipping business is going through a tough time. It is an incredible 80 percent down on the market peak in May 2008, and rates have led carrier operators on a wild and volatile ride ever since. The industry is currently oversupplied with bulk carriers…

GlobalMET Charts a new course at India chapter

Posted to GlobalMET Charts a new course at India chapter (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 22, 2010

With focus on charting a new course the Global Maritime Education & Training Association (GlobalMET), which boasts of 106 members based in 35 economies, held its annual conference in Mumbai on 20 November 2010. Held jointly with the Nautical…

Logistics and Workforce Problems Plaguing Brazil´s O&G Development

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on November 10, 2010

Petrobras was recently upgraded to being the fourth largest energy company in the world, mostly due to the pre-salt fields and there is little doubt in the market that the company can continue climbing this ladder, possibly to the very top, in another decade.

Move to give STCW a slant on learning

Posted to Move to give STCW a slant on learning (by Joseph Fonseca) on September 6, 2010

With near misses and accidents on the rise while at sea, the focus has with intensity come to rest on training and STCW conventions. A lot of soul searching and introspection is taking place with a section of trainers coming to the conclusion…

Water bridges

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 18, 2010

Water bridges, also called navigable aqueducts, were first developed by the Romans, but didn’t come into use again until 1690. That year, the Canal du Midi opened. The 150-mile long Canal connected the Garonne River (which flows into the Atlantic)…

Deepwater Horizon Questions

Posted to MarineNews Notes (by Raina Clark) on May 7, 2010

In this U.S. Navy photo, contracted fishing vessels, Mary and Jace and Gulf Rambler, pull an oil boom during a controlled burn in the Gulf of Mexico, May 5. The controlled burn was conducted in partnership with the U.S. Coast Guard, BP and other…

Technical Shipping Employment Report

Posted to Faststream (by Jocelyn Redfern) on April 1, 2010

Global shipping recruiter Faststream has published its latest maritime employment review focusing on the market for technical shipping people. The market for technical shipping jobs has improved considerably in the first quarter of 2010 with greater confidence from both candidates and employers.

Univan Ship Management in safe hands

Posted to Univan Ship Management in safe hands (by Joseph Fonseca) on March 22, 2010

When the ship management legend Captain Charles Arthur Joseph Vanderperre passed away in September last, doubts were expressed about the future of Univan Ship Management Ltd., the company he had established and nurtured. In just 80 days of having donned the mantle Richard Hext…
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