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Thursday, September 19, 2019

Alfred Thayer Mahan

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on September 16, 2011

Alfred Thayer Mahan (1840-1914) was born at West Point, where his father was an instructor. After graduating with distinction from the US Naval Academy in 1859, he served blockade duty on a number of warships during the Civil War. Mahan was promoted at…

Cruise of the Corwin

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 10, 2011

The United States Revenue Cutter (USRC) Thomas Corwin was built in Portland, Oregon in 1876, becoming the first federal government vessel built in the state. She was finished and commissioned in San Francisco in 1877. San Francisco remained her homeport for her entire period of government service.

Carriers warn Vale's big bulkers will dampen rates

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on December 9, 2010

The dry bulk shipping business is going through a tough time. It is an incredible 80 percent down on the market peak in May 2008, and rates have led carrier operators on a wild and volatile ride ever since. The industry is currently oversupplied with bulk carriers…

Los Angeles and Gambol Industries Get Closer to the Rocks

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 2, 2010

Bond ratings for the Port of Los Angeles might just be getting a downgrade within the next year, and by extension, so will those for Long Beach. The Gambol Industries shipyard controversy will be the reason. Gambol's objections center on cost…

Vizhinjam to become major transshipment port in S. India

Posted to Vizhinjam to become major transshipment port in S. India (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 29, 2010

Vizhinjam, a port located near the Southern tip of India and close to the international shipping route is being developed into a major transshipment port. Once completed it is expected to attract annually over 10,000 ships that is half the number that pass through the Suez Canal.

GlobalMET Charts a new course at India chapter

Posted to GlobalMET Charts a new course at India chapter (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 22, 2010

With focus on charting a new course the Global Maritime Education & Training Association (GlobalMET), which boasts of 106 members based in 35 economies, held its annual conference in Mumbai on 20 November 2010. Held jointly with the Nautical…

Back from the (almost) dead

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 5, 2010

The requirement for scanning of 100% of maritime shipping containers in overseas ports prior to loading on a ship bound for the United States was enacted into federal law (with various caveats) by the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007.

One Small Step for the TWIC Program?

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on September 30, 2010

Last week the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) updated its list of TWIC Readers that have successfully completed the Initial Capability Evaluation (ICE) to include an additional hand-held reader. This brings the total of portable…

Plug-in Shore Power

Posted to Marine Propulsion Report (by Keith Henderson) on September 18, 2010

A major factor slowing down the more widespread use of plug-in shore power to permit cold ironing is the lack of a safe, troublesome and easy to use standard for the shore to ship connector. Further complicating the problem is the abundance…

Move to give STCW a slant on learning

Posted to Move to give STCW a slant on learning (by Joseph Fonseca) on September 6, 2010

With near misses and accidents on the rise while at sea, the focus has with intensity come to rest on training and STCW conventions. A lot of soul searching and introspection is taking place with a section of trainers coming to the conclusion…

U.S. Coast Guard: Cherry-Picking is Not an Option

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on September 1, 2010

Responding directly to our August 10th article entitled, “STCW Compliance: will we or won’t we,” the U.S. Coast Guard’s Director of National and International Standards has affirmed the U.S. position on STCW compliance, especially as it relates…

SCI takes delivery of its first LR-I size Product Tanker

Posted to SCI takes delivery of its first LR-I size Product Tanker (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 26, 2010

State owned Shipping Corporation of India Ltd. (SCI) took delivery of a Long Range-I (LR-I) Product Tanker, M.T. Swarna Sindhu, on 23rd July, 2010 raising the number of tankers in its fleet to 41 and the company’s total fleet strength to 74 vessels. M.T.

Subsea Power Grid to Enable Large-Scale Subsea Processing

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on June 16, 2010

Large-scale seabed processing facilities will require a subsea power grid system that is able to operate for long step-outs with total reliability withstanding extreme pressure and temperatures. As technology leader on land-based power grids…

Singapore slick an inevitable consequence of being Asia’s gas station

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on May 25, 2010

If your port is at the confluence of the busiest sea lanes in the world, if it is the world’s largest refuelling port and the biggest oil storage centre in Asia, there is a lot of crude and bunker fuel floating around. So when there is an accident at sea…