28695 members and growing – the largest networking group in the maritime industry!

LoginJoin

Sunday, September 22, 2019

Sea otter

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 31, 2014

The sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a member of the weasel family that ran away to sea. It is the smallest of the marine mammals and the only one that does not rely on fat (blubber) for warmth. Rather, it has the thickest coat of fur of any mammal – up to one million strands of hair per square inch.

International Talk Like A Pirate Day

Posted to Capt Jills Journeys (by Jill Friedman) on September 19, 2014

Check my blog for todays post on International Talk Like A Pirate Day (with important links) and how you can get involved. http://captjillsjourneys.wordpress.com/2014/09/19/happy-international-talk-like-a-pirate-day/

Seamanship : Alive and Well or Dead and Gone?

Posted to Madden Maritime (by Richard Madden) on August 31, 2014

What contributes more to safety? Seamanship and common sense or the regulations and management systems that we currently use? Captain Charis Kanellopoulos argues that seamanship onboard modern merchant vessels is almost extinct, leading to an increase in incidents across the industry.

Magnetic poles

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 5, 2014

The magnetic poles are the two points on the surface of the Earth at which the magnetic field points vertically down or up (in the northern and southern hemispheres respectively). These points are located near, but not at the northern and southern geographic poles.

Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy in Peru

Posted to Global Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy (by Vietnam Inspection Company) on July 30, 2014

Peru Inspection in   Peru/ Expediting/ Surveillance/ Inspector/Expediter/  Quality control/ Testing/ Certificate/ Marine Surveyors/Superintendent P&I Correspondents Insured cargo, marine investigation & adjusting in   Peru, Countries. Dr Capt.

Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy in Singapore

Posted to Global Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy (by Vietnam Inspection Company) on July 29, 2014

Singapore Inspection in Singapore/ Expediting/ Surveillance/ Inspector/ Expediter/  Quality control/ Testing/ Certificate/ Marine Surveyors/ Superintendent P&I Correspondents Insured cargo, marine investigation & adjusting in Singapore, Countries. Dr Capt.

Cape Cod Canal

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 15, 2014

The Cape Cod Canal is a seven-mile long sea level canal connecting Cape Cod Bay to the north with Buzzards Bay to the south. Maintained by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), it has a minimum channel width of 480 feet and an authorized depth of 32 feet at mean low water.

Teak

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 20, 2014

Teak is the common name for the Tectona grandis, a member of the verbena family native to the hardwood forests of India, Burma (Myanmar), Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia. It is a large deciduous tree, growing to a height of 130 feet, with gray and grayish brown branches.

Integrating India’s Transport Network

Posted to Integrating India’s Transport Network (by Joseph Fonseca) on March 24, 2014

The logistics sector in India has today become an area of priority. One prime reason for it stems from the fact that years of high growth in the Indian economy have resulted in a significant rise in the volume of freight traffic movement. This…

European delegations’ visits - boost bilateral ties

Posted to European delegations’ visits - boost bilateral ties (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 27, 2013

India plays host to yet another major delegation after the just concluded visit of the eight-member Danish delegation led by Nick Haekkerup, Minister for Trade and Economic Affairs, Denmark having visited the Dadri facility of APM Terminals India Pvt. Ltd.

Fort Zeelandia

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 1, 2013

Once the Dutch decided to compete with the Portuguese and the Spanish for maritime commerce with East Asia, they jumped in with both feet. After establishing a base in Batavia (modern-day Jakarta), they focused on trade with China and Japan.

Talking With the Experts About Maritime Safety Culture - What is it And How to Improve It?

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on September 2, 2013

Maritime Training: The full library of maritime training articles can be found here.Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog…

Ship emissions an afterthought at Hong Kong cruise terminal

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on March 6, 2013

When it comes to infrastructure projects in Hong Kong, environmental concerns are rarely allowed to stand in the way. The grossly wasteful and pointless Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau bridge is a case in point, and we do not have the slightest doubt…

SCI acquires Kamsarmax Bulk carrier & PSV

Posted to SCI acquires Kamsarmax Bulk carrier & PSV (by Joseph Fonseca) on December 19, 2012

The Shipping Corporation of India Ltd. (SCI) accepted delivery of a Kamsarmax Bulk carrier, m.v. “Vishva Jyoti” yesterday. The vessel is the first of a series of four Kamsarmax bulk carriers ordered by SCI with Jiangsu Eastern Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., China.

USS Enterprise

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 14, 2012

The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was deactivated at Naval Station Norfolk on 1 December 2012, after 50 years of ground-breaking service. The 1,123-foot long vessel was laid down in 1958 and entered service in 1962 as the world’s first nuclear powered surface warship.

Albatross

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 14, 2012

The albatross is the largest of all birds in terms of wingspan (up to 12 feet). It can be found soaring above all ocean waters of the Southern Hemisphere and above the North Pacific. It is largely absent from the North Atlantic, probably due to loss of habitat.

Carriers in for a brutal year as capacity floods in

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on July 4, 2012

Alphaliner’s chart of the week focuses on the new tonnage that has been added by the top 20 container shipping lines in the past 12 months. As incredible as the capacity is – 844,000 TEUs for a fleet growth of 6.4 percent – the one carrier that stands out is CSAV.

Great Offshore becomes India’s first full member of International Salvage Union

Posted to Great Offshore becomes India’s first full member of International Salvage Union (by Joseph Fonseca) on June 6, 2012

India has finally got their own internationally recognized and fully established salvage company which can now operate beyond the country’s borders and bid for major contracts all over the world that are open only to members of International Salvage Union.

Chinese research icebreaker Xue Long

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 25, 2012

The Xue Long (Snow Dragon) is the premier polar vessel of the People’s Republic of China. It was built in the Ukraine in 1993 and modified upon its acquisition by China in 1994. Its major function is to serve as a resupply vessel and scientific research platform in the Antarctic and the Arctic.

What have we learned from the Titanic casualty?

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 13, 2012

Late on the night of April 14, 1912, the “unsinkable” passenger ship RMS Titanic, on its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York struck an iceberg. It sank about three hours later, at about 2:20 a.m. on April 15, 1912. Of the 2,224 persons on board, 1,514 lost their lives.
  • 1
  • 2