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Monday, October 26, 2020

BC Ferries - a Case Study in Blended Maritime Assessment - Part 1

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on April 2, 2012

Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog by following the blog.Share this blog post.Follow me on Twitter.IntroductionAssessment in the maritime industry is a huge subject.

Marad’s Crown Jewel: v2 – a work in progress…

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on December 14, 2011

You have to ask yourself – what’s the hurry? The urgency with which the U.S. Department of Transportation and its usually ineffective Maritime Administration seem to be intent on reinventing the wheel on the campus of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy is simply breathtaking.

Some TWICs Won’t Work in Readers

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on December 6, 2011

Some 26,000 Transportation Worker Identification Credentials (TWICs) may be rejected by TWIC reader machines because of defective encoding. At some point recently, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) posted on the “Latest News”…

The Move to Blended Learning in Maritime Training

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on May 21, 2012

Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog by following the blog.Share this blog post.Follow me on Twitter.The Move to Blended…

Abel Tasman

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 4, 2012

Abel Tasman (1603-1659) was a Dutch merchant and explorer. He is credited with the European discovery of Australia and New Zealand. He joined the Dutch United East India Company (Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie - VOC) in 1633 and was promptly…

Transafrica, a dedicated Indo-Africa freight corridor service launched

Posted to Transafrica, a dedicated Indo-Africa freight corridor service launched (by Joseph Fonseca) on April 30, 2012

In a major development for cargo movement between India and the African continent, the Indo-Africa freight corridor branded, TransAfrica service was launched in Mumbai last fortnight. Promoted jointly by Transocean Express Logistics Pvt Ltd.…

China carrier takes industry losses to new lows

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on April 3, 2012

Just when you thought the 2011 shipping industry losses could not possibly get any worse, along comes one of China’s state owned carriers to set the benchmark at a new low. As China’s largest line, that honour naturally fell to Cosco, and the…

Other experimental ironclads

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 23, 2012

When the Union Navy learned that the Confederate Navy was building an iron-clad warship to threaten the wooden-hulled blockade fleet, it launched a crash project to build its own iron-clad warships. Of the 17 proposals submitted, the Union Navy selected three for construction.

Joshua James - Lifesaver

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 16, 2012

Joshua James (1826-1902) served as a lifesaver for 60 of his 75 years. Born in Hull, Massachusetts, he joined the Massachusetts Humane Society (an organization modeled on the Royal National Lifeboat Institution – RNLI) at age 15 after his mother and one of his sisters died in a ship wreck.

Alfred Thayer Mahan

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on September 16, 2011

Alfred Thayer Mahan (1840-1914) was born at West Point, where his father was an instructor. After graduating with distinction from the US Naval Academy in 1859, he served blockade duty on a number of warships during the Civil War. Mahan was promoted at…

Seek Boat Crew Workers

Posted to Crew Workers Wanted (by Cindy Miller) on August 28, 2011

We want to use this medium to inform you that our Cruise company has offer employment opportunities for foreigner. We have jobs opening from restaurant, Office-work, to child care section in London, United Kingdom. Job Salary: This will Depend on your specialization…

Georg Wilhelm Steller

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 5, 2011

Georg Wilhelm Steller (1709-1746) was a naturalist and zoologist, noted for being the first European to set foot in what is now Alaska and for describing and documenting some of the unique animal life of the region. He was born in Windsheim, Bavaria and studied at the University of Wittenberg.

USCG Waives Maritime Security Regulations for Some Facilities

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on July 26, 2011

The US Coast has just issued MTSA Policy Advisory Council Decision 02-11 (PAC 02-11), “Waiving Facilities that Transfer Certain Low Risk Commodities.”  Owners/operators of MTSA-regulated facilities that transfer or store bulk commodities that are listed in the Decision as being low risk can…

SCI takes delivery of Supermax bulker

Posted to SCI takes delivery of Supermax bulker (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 13, 2011

The state owned Shipping Corporation of India Ltd. (SCI), country’s largest shipping company, took delivery of the first of the two Supramax bulk carriers they had contracted for following competitive global tendering process. SCI had selected…

Chesapeake & Delaware Canal

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 14, 2011

A canal connecting Chesapeake Bay and Delaware Bay was envisaged as early as the mid-seventeenth century, when it was realized that the two bodies of water were separated only by a relatively narrow strip of land. A canal company was first founded in 1802…

Cruise of the Corwin

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 10, 2011

The United States Revenue Cutter (USRC) Thomas Corwin was built in Portland, Oregon in 1876, becoming the first federal government vessel built in the state. She was finished and commissioned in San Francisco in 1877. San Francisco remained her homeport for her entire period of government service.

A Temporary Change in Latitude – and Attitude

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on April 20, 2011

Bonaire, Netherland Antilles: Day four of spring break finds me on the verandah of my laid back Bonaire resort, looking out over the pristine maritime landscape. This week, we returned here for holiday, three years after first discovering this island jewel back in April of 2008.

Seattle Shipyard Takeover is a Pointer for 2011

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 30, 2010

Speculation on the forthcoming year has become remarkably sparse in the last couple of years because of the tumultuous events in liner shipping and uncertainty over the international economic situation. But a year-end port-related takeover is…

Nikumaroro

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 21, 2010

Nikumaroro (previously known as Gardner Island) is a small coral atoll in the central Pacific Ocean situated just south of the Equator and just west of the 180th meridian. It lies in the Phoenix Island Chain and is part of the Republic of Kiribati.