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Monday, October 26, 2020

Talking With the Experts About Maritime Safety Culture - What is it And How to Improve It?

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on September 2, 2013

Maritime Training: The full library of maritime training articles can be found here.Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog…

Transhipment business model no good for Hong Kong

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on May 7, 2013

Some ports lend themselves, via geographic location or strategy, to transshipment. Singapore, for instance, had a throughput of 31.6 million TEUs in 2012, but more than 90 percent was comprised of containers in transit. Geographically, Singapore…

TAMP to lose its tariff fixing role

Posted to TAMP to lose its tariff fixing role (by Joseph Fonseca) on January 9, 2013

Facing all round flak the government has finally decided curtailing the tariff fixing function of the Tariff Authority for Major Ports (TAMP). This was one of the major decisions taken at the 14 Maritime States Development Council (MSDC) meeting of 8 January 2013. The Union Shipping Minister G.

Indian Navy and Coast Guard to the rescue of the Indian Administration?

Posted to Indian Navy and Coast Guard to the rescue of the Indian Administration? (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 16, 2012

The Government of India is mulling over the idea of handing over the statutory functions of the Indian Administration (Directorate General of Shipping) to the Indian Navy and the Coast Guard. As a beginning, the two agencies are likely to begin…

Austro-Hungarian North Pole Expedition

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 22, 2013

Well into the nineteenth century, many believed that the region of the North Pole was open water, surrounded by floating ice. If one could only locate an opening in the ice, it would be possible to sail from the temperate region to the North Pole and possibly out the other side.

Fluyt

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 5, 2013

The fluyt or fluitschip was one of the first ocean-going ships built exclusively for commerce. Previously, ships tended to be built to perform the dual role of fighting battles and carrying cargo. Thus, their construction was fairly robust and they carried cannons, ammunition, and combat personnel.

Regional Scale Nodes Project

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 9, 2013

The University of Washington is leading the Regional Scale Nodes Project for the National Science Foundation (NSF) Ocean Observatory Initiative. The cabled underwater research facility is being constructed off the Oregon and Washington coasts.

Stad ship tunnel

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 10, 2013

In a move reminiscent of the Athos Canal, built 483-480 BC at the direction of the Persian Emperor Xerxes, or the Corinth Canal, built in the 1890’s by the Greek Government, Norway has tentatively approved construction of a tunnel through the…

Ideal X

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 26, 2013

On 26 April 1956, the ship Ideal X departed Port Newark, New Jersey on a voyage to Houston, Texas. The ship had been launched in 1945 as the T-2 tanker SS Potrero Hills. The ship had made many voyages in the intervening eleven years, but this was different.

Civil engineers update their report card on ports

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on March 31, 2013

In what is essentially an update of a 2012 report, The American Society of Civil Engineers has awarded a C grade to the nation’s seaports and their efforts to keep up with essential maintenance and improvement. Much of the report I covered in…

CG 36500

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 19, 2013

The US Coast Guard motor lifeboat 36500 is the only one of the many hundreds that were built between the 1930s and the 1950s to be placed on the National Register of Historic Places. On 18 February 1952, during a severe winter storm off Cape Cod…

Ship emissions an afterthought at Hong Kong cruise terminal

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on March 6, 2013

When it comes to infrastructure projects in Hong Kong, environmental concerns are rarely allowed to stand in the way. The grossly wasteful and pointless Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau bridge is a case in point, and we do not have the slightest doubt…

USS Enterprise

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 14, 2012

The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was deactivated at Naval Station Norfolk on 1 December 2012, after 50 years of ground-breaking service. The 1,123-foot long vessel was laid down in 1958 and entered service in 1962 as the world’s first nuclear powered surface warship.

MLC set to brighten up the seafaring career

Posted to MLC set to brighten up the seafaring career (by Joseph Fonseca) on October 29, 2012

Set to bring back the lost glory of seafaring, the Maritime Labor Convention 2006 (MLC) which will come into force on 20 August 2013, is expected to not only provide  comprehensive rights and protection at work for the seafarers but is also…

India Shipping Summit focuses on positive perspectives and opportunities

Posted to India Shipping Summit focuses on positive perspectives and opportunities (by Joseph Fonseca) on October 15, 2012

Acknowledging the economic downturn that has spread gloom in most spheres of activities, factoring in low key performances and struggles of stakeholders to remain afloat, the recently concluded India Shipping Summit 2012, held last week in Mumbai…

Do You Evaluate Your Maritime Training? You Should. Here's Why, and How.

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on August 27, 2012

Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog by following the blog.Maritime Mentoring: International Maritime Mentoring Community - Find a Mentor…

Albatross

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 14, 2012

The albatross is the largest of all birds in terms of wingspan (up to 12 feet). It can be found soaring above all ocean waters of the Southern Hemisphere and above the North Pacific. It is largely absent from the North Atlantic, probably due to loss of habitat.

SINKEX

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 31, 2012

The United States Navy disposes of many of its old, obsolete, and decommissioned warships by sinking them in deep ocean waters. This practice, called a sinking exercise or SINKEX, involves removing toxic and hazardous substances to the maximum practicable extent…

Carriers in for a brutal year as capacity floods in

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on July 4, 2012

Alphaliner’s chart of the week focuses on the new tonnage that has been added by the top 20 container shipping lines in the past 12 months. As incredible as the capacity is – 844,000 TEUs for a fleet growth of 6.4 percent – the one carrier that stands out is CSAV.

Long Beach stands toe-to-toe with its bigger neighbor

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on June 28, 2012

A dramatic shift in financial bulk is taking place at the two main Southern Californian ports over the next 18 months. For the first time, Long Beach will be looking its neighbor, Los Angeles, in the eye. The two ports are standing virtually…