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Friday, October 30, 2020

The 1929 Grand Banks earthquake

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 24, 2015

At about 5:02 pm on Monday, November 18, 1929, a 7.2 magnitude earthquake struck beneath the Laurentian Continental Slope about 250 miles south of the island of Newfoundland. The water there is about 7,000 feet deep. The earthquake was felt as far away as New York, Bermuda, and Montreal.

Transhipment business model no good for Hong Kong

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on May 7, 2013

Some ports lend themselves, via geographic location or strategy, to transshipment. Singapore, for instance, had a throughput of 31.6 million TEUs in 2012, but more than 90 percent was comprised of containers in transit. Geographically, Singapore…

TAMP to lose its tariff fixing role

Posted to TAMP to lose its tariff fixing role (by Joseph Fonseca) on January 9, 2013

Facing all round flak the government has finally decided curtailing the tariff fixing function of the Tariff Authority for Major Ports (TAMP). This was one of the major decisions taken at the 14 Maritime States Development Council (MSDC) meeting of 8 January 2013. The Union Shipping Minister G.

India Shipping Summit focuses on positive perspectives and opportunities

Posted to India Shipping Summit focuses on positive perspectives and opportunities (by Joseph Fonseca) on October 15, 2012

Acknowledging the economic downturn that has spread gloom in most spheres of activities, factoring in low key performances and struggles of stakeholders to remain afloat, the recently concluded India Shipping Summit 2012, held last week in Mumbai…

Sea otter

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 31, 2014

The sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a member of the weasel family that ran away to sea. It is the smallest of the marine mammals and the only one that does not rely on fat (blubber) for warmth. Rather, it has the thickest coat of fur of any mammal – up to one million strands of hair per square inch.

International Talk Like A Pirate Day

Posted to Capt Jills Journeys (by Jill Friedman) on September 19, 2014

Check my blog for todays post on International Talk Like A Pirate Day (with important links) and how you can get involved. http://captjillsjourneys.wordpress.com/2014/09/19/happy-international-talk-like-a-pirate-day/

Teak

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 20, 2014

Teak is the common name for the Tectona grandis, a member of the verbena family native to the hardwood forests of India, Burma (Myanmar), Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia. It is a large deciduous tree, growing to a height of 130 feet, with gray and grayish brown branches.

Malacca

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 8, 2014

The Strait of Malacca is named after Malacca, now part of Malaysia. In about the year 1400, Parameswana, the last Raja of Singapura, was expelled from the area around present-day Singapore by local rivals. He relocated to the fishing village of Malacca…

Elephant seal

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 1, 2014

Elephant seals are large seals represented by two species, the northern elephant seal and the southern elephant seal. Both were hunted to near extinction through the end of the nineteenth century. The smaller northern elephant seal is found in the eastern portion of the North Pacific Ocean…

Integrating India’s Transport Network

Posted to Integrating India’s Transport Network (by Joseph Fonseca) on March 24, 2014

The logistics sector in India has today become an area of priority. One prime reason for it stems from the fact that years of high growth in the Indian economy have resulted in a significant rise in the volume of freight traffic movement. This…

Dozen more China FTZs a waste of effort

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on January 28, 2014

China will have 12 free trade zones, Beijing announced a couple of weeks ago. Interesting, considering that Shanghai can’t even explain exactly what its own highly publicised free trade zone will be doing. So far it is all hot air and hyperbole…

Regional Scale Nodes Project

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 9, 2013

The University of Washington is leading the Regional Scale Nodes Project for the National Science Foundation (NSF) Ocean Observatory Initiative. The cabled underwater research facility is being constructed off the Oregon and Washington coasts.

Stad ship tunnel

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 10, 2013

In a move reminiscent of the Athos Canal, built 483-480 BC at the direction of the Persian Emperor Xerxes, or the Corinth Canal, built in the 1890’s by the Greek Government, Norway has tentatively approved construction of a tunnel through the…

Civil engineers update their report card on ports

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on March 31, 2013

In what is essentially an update of a 2012 report, The American Society of Civil Engineers has awarded a C grade to the nation’s seaports and their efforts to keep up with essential maintenance and improvement. Much of the report I covered in…

Ship emissions an afterthought at Hong Kong cruise terminal

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on March 6, 2013

When it comes to infrastructure projects in Hong Kong, environmental concerns are rarely allowed to stand in the way. The grossly wasteful and pointless Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau bridge is a case in point, and we do not have the slightest doubt…

SINKEX

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 31, 2012

The United States Navy disposes of many of its old, obsolete, and decommissioned warships by sinking them in deep ocean waters. This practice, called a sinking exercise or SINKEX, involves removing toxic and hazardous substances to the maximum practicable extent…

Indian Navy and Coast Guard to the rescue of the Indian Administration?

Posted to Indian Navy and Coast Guard to the rescue of the Indian Administration? (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 16, 2012

The Government of India is mulling over the idea of handing over the statutory functions of the Indian Administration (Directorate General of Shipping) to the Indian Navy and the Coast Guard. As a beginning, the two agencies are likely to begin…

Long Beach stands toe-to-toe with its bigger neighbor

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on June 28, 2012

A dramatic shift in financial bulk is taking place at the two main Southern Californian ports over the next 18 months. For the first time, Long Beach will be looking its neighbor, Los Angeles, in the eye. The two ports are standing virtually…

Abel Tasman

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 4, 2012

Abel Tasman (1603-1659) was a Dutch merchant and explorer. He is credited with the European discovery of Australia and New Zealand. He joined the Dutch United East India Company (Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie - VOC) in 1633 and was promptly…

Transafrica, a dedicated Indo-Africa freight corridor service launched

Posted to Transafrica, a dedicated Indo-Africa freight corridor service launched (by Joseph Fonseca) on April 30, 2012

In a major development for cargo movement between India and the African continent, the Indo-Africa freight corridor branded, TransAfrica service was launched in Mumbai last fortnight. Promoted jointly by Transocean Express Logistics Pvt Ltd.…