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Friday, November 22, 2019

Sea otter

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 31, 2014

The sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a member of the weasel family that ran away to sea. It is the smallest of the marine mammals and the only one that does not rely on fat (blubber) for warmth. Rather, it has the thickest coat of fur of any mammal – up to one million strands of hair per square inch.

International Talk Like A Pirate Day

Posted to Capt Jills Journeys (by Jill Friedman) on September 19, 2014

Check my blog for todays post on International Talk Like A Pirate Day (with important links) and how you can get involved. http://captjillsjourneys.wordpress.com/2014/09/19/happy-international-talk-like-a-pirate-day/

One Small Step for the TWIC Program?

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on September 30, 2010

Last week the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) updated its list of TWIC Readers that have successfully completed the Initial Capability Evaluation (ICE) to include an additional hand-held reader. This brings the total of portable…

Move to give STCW a slant on learning

Posted to Move to give STCW a slant on learning (by Joseph Fonseca) on September 6, 2010

With near misses and accidents on the rise while at sea, the focus has with intensity come to rest on training and STCW conventions. A lot of soul searching and introspection is taking place with a section of trainers coming to the conclusion…

Teak

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 20, 2014

Teak is the common name for the Tectona grandis, a member of the verbena family native to the hardwood forests of India, Burma (Myanmar), Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia. It is a large deciduous tree, growing to a height of 130 feet, with gray and grayish brown branches.

Integrating India’s Transport Network

Posted to Integrating India’s Transport Network (by Joseph Fonseca) on March 24, 2014

The logistics sector in India has today become an area of priority. One prime reason for it stems from the fact that years of high growth in the Indian economy have resulted in a significant rise in the volume of freight traffic movement. This…

Ship emissions an afterthought at Hong Kong cruise terminal

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on March 6, 2013

When it comes to infrastructure projects in Hong Kong, environmental concerns are rarely allowed to stand in the way. The grossly wasteful and pointless Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau bridge is a case in point, and we do not have the slightest doubt…

What have we learned from the Titanic casualty?

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 13, 2012

Late on the night of April 14, 1912, the “unsinkable” passenger ship RMS Titanic, on its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York struck an iceberg. It sank about three hours later, at about 2:20 a.m. on April 15, 1912. Of the 2,224 persons on board, 1,514 lost their lives.

SCI takes delivery of Supermax bulker

Posted to SCI takes delivery of Supermax bulker (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 13, 2011

The state owned Shipping Corporation of India Ltd. (SCI), country’s largest shipping company, took delivery of the first of the two Supramax bulk carriers they had contracted for following competitive global tendering process. SCI had selected…

Cruise of the Corwin

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 10, 2011

The United States Revenue Cutter (USRC) Thomas Corwin was built in Portland, Oregon in 1876, becoming the first federal government vessel built in the state. She was finished and commissioned in San Francisco in 1877. San Francisco remained her homeport for her entire period of government service.

APU / Maritime Reporter WEBCAST Series Kicks off in February

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on December 22, 2010

Maritime stakeholders continue to face complex challenges. Maintaining a healthy bottom line in the face of a myriad of regulatory, environmental and operational risks, therefore, has become Job 1. Preventing the loss of vessel and crew from acts of piracy…

Nikumaroro

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 21, 2010

Nikumaroro (previously known as Gardner Island) is a small coral atoll in the central Pacific Ocean situated just south of the Equator and just west of the 180th meridian. It lies in the Phoenix Island Chain and is part of the Republic of Kiribati.

Strategic Local FPSO Builders Chosen

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on November 15, 2010

There was still a need for a tender process to select which local company would be responsible for the construction process of the first 8 FPSOs to be built from a total of 40 FPSOs originally calculated to be needed for the pre-salt development.

Subsea Power Grid to Enable Large-Scale Subsea Processing

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on June 16, 2010

Large-scale seabed processing facilities will require a subsea power grid system that is able to operate for long step-outs with total reliability withstanding extreme pressure and temperatures. As technology leader on land-based power grids…