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Wednesday, October 23, 2019

RV Mirai

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on September 23, 2014

The Japanese Government’s oceanographic research vessel Mirai, at 8,687 GT and a length of 421 feet, is one of the largest vessels of its type in the world. The ship, originally named Mutsu when launched in 1970, was one of only four nuclear…

Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy in Thailand

Posted to Global Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy (by Vietnam Inspection Company) on July 30, 2014

Thailand Inspection in Thailand/ Expediting/ Surveillance/ Inspector/Expediter/  Quality control/ Testing/ Certificate/ Marine Surveyors/Superintendent P&I Correspondents Insured cargo, marine investigation & adjusting in Thailand, Countries. Dr Capt.

Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy in Myanmar

Posted to Global Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy (by Vietnam Inspection Company) on July 30, 2014

Myanmar Inspection in   Myanmar/ Expediting/ Surveillance/ Inspector/Expediter/  Quality control/ Testing/ Certificate/ Marine Surveyors/Superintendent P&I Correspondents Insured cargo, marine investigation & adjusting in   Myanmar, Countries. Dr Capt.

Sand dollar

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 18, 2014

Sand dollar is a general term for various species of extremely flattened sea urchins of the order Clypeasteroida. They may be found in temperate or tropical marine waters worldwide and are also known as sea cookies, snapper biscuits, or pansy shells.

William Lewis Herndon

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 18, 2014

William Lewis Herndon (1813-1857) was appointed Midshipman in the relatively new United States Navy in 1828, serving afloat in the Pacific, Atlantic, Mediterranean, and Gulf of Mexico. From 1842 through 1847, he served at the new Naval Observatory and Hydrographic Office in Washington…

A bullish start to the year for US ports

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on January 30, 2013

US ports are reporting some pretty good results for 2012, despite gloomy assessments from economists about the performance of the national economy. What’s more a couple of forecasts for 2013 are surprisingly upbeat, while indications from others show a good first half of their fiscal years.

Placid management veneer at two major port systems is shaken

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on August 31, 2012

There are upheavals at two ports that have been considered among the most admired and efficient in the country. Seattle’s CEO, Tay Yoshitani, is being scrutinized for taking on a directorship for 3PL group Expeditors, while Jerry Bridges has…

Maritime Security Directive on Piracy: Update

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on January 12, 2011

The Notice of Availability for the US Coast Guard’s Maritime Security Directive 104-6 (Rev 5) is scheduled for publication in the Federal Register tomorrow (January 13). My earlier speculation that Revision 5 increased the area of the Indian…

RiverNotes: A Moment on the Mississippi

Posted to MarineNews Notes (by Raina Clark) on July 5, 2010

Behind the boat, the lights of Quincy, Illinois receded into a bright cluster. On either side of the river, the outline of the heavily treed banks closed in on the city and contrasted like a black cutout against the transluscent night sky. The stars were out…

China buys Greece, adds it to growing country portfolio

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on June 17, 2010

No purchase price was given, but Chinese officials said they had paid “billions of dollars” for the debt-stricken Mediterranean country earlier this week. Okay, that’s not exactly how it went down, but it may as well have been. Bad jokes aside…

100% scanning – 50% dead

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 8, 2009

As Congress was reviewing draft legislation to implement the recommendations of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks upon the United States, someone made a suggestion. The proposal would require, by 2012, each maritime shipping container…

White House Job Summit Could Start With Easing Business Climate

Posted to Gulf Coast Maritime (by Matt Gresham) on November 13, 2009

Skyrocketing healthcare costs are the fault of big bad insurance companies. High fuel costs are the fault of Big Oil. Wall Street’s woes are solely the responsibility of greedy CEOs and out-of-control investment bankers. One would think anyone…