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Thursday, September 19, 2019

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New Siberian Islands

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 6, 2015

The archipelago called the New Siberian Islands is not new, having existed for eons and containing fossils from the Late Pleistocene (over 100,000 years ago) and probably earlier. Bedrock on the islands is significantly older. The archipelago is comprised of three groups of islands.

HMS Endeavour

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 2, 2014

The bark HMS Endeavour was built in 1764 as the collier Earl of Pembroke. A type known locally as a Whitby Cat, it had a broad, flat bow, a square stern, a long box-like body with a deep hold, and a flat bottom. Originally ship-rigged, it was…

Fracking could be the new future for some ports

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on April 28, 2013

Northwest and as the door on a coal terminal closes, another opens for hydraulic fracturing (fracking). Gray’s Harbor, normally associated with autos and breakbulk, is eyeing a huge bonanza in the form of crude-by-rail. The stuff will probably come from the fields…

TSA Announces TWIC Extension Option

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on June 18, 2012

On June 15, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) TWIC website announced a forthcoming option for many holders of the Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC) to extend the expiration date of their TWICs pending implementation…

Georg Wilhelm Steller

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 5, 2011

Georg Wilhelm Steller (1709-1746) was a naturalist and zoologist, noted for being the first European to set foot in what is now Alaska and for describing and documenting some of the unique animal life of the region. He was born in Windsheim, Bavaria and studied at the University of Wittenberg.

USCG Districts

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 6, 2010

The US Coast Guard adopted the concept of geographic districts when it absorbed the US Lighthouse Service in 1939. Previously, it had no formal segmentation of its chain of command based on geography. Rather, the chain of command was grouped around function.