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Tuesday, September 17, 2019

Sea lily

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 13, 2015

The sea lily (Bourgueticrinida) is an order of marine animals referred to as crinoids. They are typically found in deep ocean waters (to a depth of about 18,000 feet). In their adult form, they are attached to the sea floor by means of a stalk.

Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy in Vietnam

Posted to Global Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy (by Vietnam Inspection Company) on July 29, 2014

Vietnam Inspection in Vietnam/ Expediting/ Surveillance/ Inspector/ Expediter/  Quality control/ Testing/ Certificate/ Marine Surveyors/ Superintendent P&I Correspondents Insured cargo, marine investigation & adjusting in Vietnam, Countries. Dr Capt.

Prison Ship Martyrs’ Monument

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on September 3, 2013

During the American Revolutionary War, British forces captured thousands of “rebels”. Those in uniform were accorded treatment somewhat akin to prisoner of war status. Those not in uniform, particularly the maritime privateers, were subjected to harsher conditions.

Henry Hudson

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 22, 2011

Little is known of Henry Hudson prior to 1607, when he was hired by the Muscovy Company of the Kingdom of England to find a northern route to the Far East. He and a crew of ten sailed on the 80-ton Hopewell. They reached the east coast of Greenland and traveled north to the ice pack.

Georg Wilhelm Steller

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 5, 2011

Georg Wilhelm Steller (1709-1746) was a naturalist and zoologist, noted for being the first European to set foot in what is now Alaska and for describing and documenting some of the unique animal life of the region. He was born in Windsheim, Bavaria and studied at the University of Wittenberg.

Anglo Eastern innovate Advance Process Instrumentation Trainer

Posted to Anglo Eastern innovate Advance Process Instrumentation Trainer (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 4, 2011

Since simulators, ship-in-campus and other systems have their limitation for imparting training to marine engineers in some of the advanced areas Anglo Eastern Maritime Training Center has come up with an innovation for imparting training to…

Results of the April 12-13 Meeting of NMSAC - Part 1

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on April 15, 2011

The US Government having been kept in business for another week, the National Maritime Security Advisory Committee (NMSAC) started a two-day meeting on April 12th. The agenda previously discussed was modified such that the day started with the discussion of Seafarer Access Shore Leave Policy…

Perihelion

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 4, 2011

The whoosh you experienced at about 1900 UTC on Monday, January 3, 2011 was the sun passing by on its closest approach to the Earth – a mere 91,402,505 miles away. This recurs every year, often at night when it can’t be observed. The date and…

Nikumaroro

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 21, 2010

Nikumaroro (previously known as Gardner Island) is a small coral atoll in the central Pacific Ocean situated just south of the Equator and just west of the 180th meridian. It lies in the Phoenix Island Chain and is part of the Republic of Kiribati.

U.S. Coast Guard: Cherry-Picking is Not an Option

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on September 1, 2010

Responding directly to our August 10th article entitled, “STCW Compliance: will we or won’t we,” the U.S. Coast Guard’s Director of National and International Standards has affirmed the U.S. position on STCW compliance, especially as it relates…

Long Beach Blows a Raspberry at Local Politicians

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on July 15, 2010

The principle of "One hand washing the other" might apply to Washington bureaucrats and politicians, but Long Beach port authorities are having none of it. The angst over the LB city council demanding an extra dollop of cash from the port for the Tidelands fund continues…

Unique Corus Tubes for Tupi Project

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on July 9, 2010

Corus Tubes has successfully manufactured 118km of 457mm x 31.75mm Grade X65 sour linepipe for the Petrobras Tupi project. This linepipe is designed to operate in Brazil’s Santos Basin at a depth of 2200m, and is thickest 18” UOE pipe manufactured to date.

Limitation of Liability Act of 1851

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 6, 2010

The Limitation of Liability Act, now located at 46 U.S. Code sections 30501-30512, was adopted to provide shipowners a measure of protection if their ships were to cause injury or damage to others in cases where the shipowners have no privity or knowledge relative to the cause of the incident.

Thames Barrier

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 8, 2010

The Thames Barrier is a 1,710-foot wide movable flood control barrier across the River Thames just downstream from central London. After a ten-year construction period, it was officially opened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II on May 8, 1984.