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Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Sea lily

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 13, 2015

The sea lily (Bourgueticrinida) is an order of marine animals referred to as crinoids. They are typically found in deep ocean waters (to a depth of about 18,000 feet). In their adult form, they are attached to the sea floor by means of a stalk.

Teak

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 20, 2014

Teak is the common name for the Tectona grandis, a member of the verbena family native to the hardwood forests of India, Burma (Myanmar), Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia. It is a large deciduous tree, growing to a height of 130 feet, with gray and grayish brown branches.

Gulf States Shipbuilders Consortium Tackles Big Issues

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on April 3, 2014

I want to start out by thanking Audrey (Kennedy) for inviting me to speak to you this afternoon. It’s a privilege to do so, especially with an audience representing such an important part of the domestic waterfront, and at a time when much of…

Integrating India’s Transport Network

Posted to Integrating India’s Transport Network (by Joseph Fonseca) on March 24, 2014

The logistics sector in India has today become an area of priority. One prime reason for it stems from the fact that years of high growth in the Indian economy have resulted in a significant rise in the volume of freight traffic movement. This…

Vessel collision accidents in China

Posted to Eversafe Marine (by song Tom) on December 9, 2013

December 6, 2013 morning, the two vessels "MV XIUMEI TIANJIN"  and "JIA LI HAI" collided in sea area of Zhejiang Zhoushan. The DWT 100,000 cargo ship “JIA LI HAI” owned by China COSCO was driving to Laotangshan port when got collision with 168 m long container ship "MV XIUMEI TIANJIN".

IMU - the Maritime Varsity in turmoil

Posted to IMU - the Maritime Varsity in turmoil (by Joseph Fonseca) on April 10, 2013

Four years into its existence, the Indian Maritime University set up under the Union government has turned out to be a big disappointment. Most stakeholders in maritime education and training feel let down on hearing the disturbing news about the new vice-chancellor…

Understanding eLearning in Maritime Job Training and Familiarization - Part 4

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on February 6, 2012

Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog by following the blog.Share this blog post.Follow me on Twitter.Understanding eLearning…

Excursion vessels in polar waters

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 11, 2014

The world was recently witness to a multi-national effort to rescue the Russian excursion vessel Akademik Shokalskiy after it was beset in wind-driven ice off the coast of Antarctica. The French supply vessel L’Astrolabe turned back from its relief effort.

Chowgule’s ship-lift fast becoming a reality

Posted to Chowgule’s ship-lift fast becoming a reality (by Joseph Fonseca) on January 8, 2014

Mid-way between Mumbai and Goa on the West coast of India, a new ship-lift facility being constructed by the Chowgule group, is fast becoming a reality. Situated adjacent to the group’s Angre Port, the repair yard will have the capacity to handle six ships simultaneously of up to 10…

Drive to cut costs may push shipping into the clouds

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on September 21, 2012

Maersk Line recently signed a US$150 million cloud computing deal with HP. In the five-year agreement, the Danish carrier will use HP’s cloud-enabled data centers and HP Workplace Services in what is known as an “instant-on enterprise”. Yes, that made no sense to me, either.

Louisiana is Shipyard Leader in USA

Posted to Ship Building in the US Gulf Coast Region (by Tyler LeCompte) on January 19, 2012

Leevac’s shipyard in Louisiana and new vessel construction facilities include an 85,000-square-foot computerized steel fabrication shop (with a computer-aided plasma cutting machine), a computerized pipe machine (three-axis pipe cutting system)…

Henry Hudson

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 22, 2011

Little is known of Henry Hudson prior to 1607, when he was hired by the Muscovy Company of the Kingdom of England to find a northern route to the Far East. He and a crew of ten sailed on the 80-ton Hopewell. They reached the east coast of Greenland and traveled north to the ice pack.

Alfred Thayer Mahan

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on September 16, 2011

Alfred Thayer Mahan (1840-1914) was born at West Point, where his father was an instructor. After graduating with distinction from the US Naval Academy in 1859, he served blockade duty on a number of warships during the Civil War. Mahan was promoted at…

Anglo Eastern innovate Advance Process Instrumentation Trainer

Posted to Anglo Eastern innovate Advance Process Instrumentation Trainer (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 4, 2011

Since simulators, ship-in-campus and other systems have their limitation for imparting training to marine engineers in some of the advanced areas Anglo Eastern Maritime Training Center has come up with an innovation for imparting training to…

Cruise of the Corwin

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 10, 2011

The United States Revenue Cutter (USRC) Thomas Corwin was built in Portland, Oregon in 1876, becoming the first federal government vessel built in the state. She was finished and commissioned in San Francisco in 1877. San Francisco remained her homeport for her entire period of government service.

A Temporary Change in Latitude – and Attitude

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on April 20, 2011

Bonaire, Netherland Antilles: Day four of spring break finds me on the verandah of my laid back Bonaire resort, looking out over the pristine maritime landscape. This week, we returned here for holiday, three years after first discovering this island jewel back in April of 2008.

Results of the April 12-13 Meeting of NMSAC - Part 1

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on April 15, 2011

The US Government having been kept in business for another week, the National Maritime Security Advisory Committee (NMSAC) started a two-day meeting on April 12th. The agenda previously discussed was modified such that the day started with the discussion of Seafarer Access Shore Leave Policy…

Perihelion

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 4, 2011

The whoosh you experienced at about 1900 UTC on Monday, January 3, 2011 was the sun passing by on its closest approach to the Earth – a mere 91,402,505 miles away. This recurs every year, often at night when it can’t be observed. The date and…

Nikumaroro

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 21, 2010

Nikumaroro (previously known as Gardner Island) is a small coral atoll in the central Pacific Ocean situated just south of the Equator and just west of the 180th meridian. It lies in the Phoenix Island Chain and is part of the Republic of Kiribati.

Strategic Local FPSO Builders Chosen

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on November 15, 2010

There was still a need for a tender process to select which local company would be responsible for the construction process of the first 8 FPSOs to be built from a total of 40 FPSOs originally calculated to be needed for the pre-salt development.
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