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Thursday, December 3, 2020

Sea lily

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 13, 2015

The sea lily (Bourgueticrinida) is an order of marine animals referred to as crinoids. They are typically found in deep ocean waters (to a depth of about 18,000 feet). In their adult form, they are attached to the sea floor by means of a stalk.

Using Multiple Choice Tests in Maritime Training Assessments

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on March 18, 2013

Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog by following the blog.Maritime Mentoring: International Maritime Mentoring Community - Find a Mentor…

HMS Endeavour

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 2, 2014

The bark HMS Endeavour was built in 1764 as the collier Earl of Pembroke. A type known locally as a Whitby Cat, it had a broad, flat bow, a square stern, a long box-like body with a deep hold, and a flat bottom. Originally ship-rigged, it was…

Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy in Vietnam

Posted to Global Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy (by Vietnam Inspection Company) on July 29, 2014

Vietnam Inspection in Vietnam/ Expediting/ Surveillance/ Inspector/ Expediter/  Quality control/ Testing/ Certificate/ Marine Surveyors/ Superintendent P&I Correspondents Insured cargo, marine investigation & adjusting in Vietnam, Countries. Dr Capt.

Teak

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 20, 2014

Teak is the common name for the Tectona grandis, a member of the verbena family native to the hardwood forests of India, Burma (Myanmar), Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia. It is a large deciduous tree, growing to a height of 130 feet, with gray and grayish brown branches.

Integrating India’s Transport Network

Posted to Integrating India’s Transport Network (by Joseph Fonseca) on March 24, 2014

The logistics sector in India has today become an area of priority. One prime reason for it stems from the fact that years of high growth in the Indian economy have resulted in a significant rise in the volume of freight traffic movement. This…

"What is the point of testing in Maritime Training"? Very few people know the correct answer to this question. This is a problem.

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on February 24, 2014

Maritime Training: The full library of maritime training articles can be found here.Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog…

Excursion vessels in polar waters

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 11, 2014

The world was recently witness to a multi-national effort to rescue the Russian excursion vessel Akademik Shokalskiy after it was beset in wind-driven ice off the coast of Antarctica. The French supply vessel L’Astrolabe turned back from its relief effort.

Vessel collision accidents in China

Posted to Eversafe Marine (by song Tom) on December 9, 2013

December 6, 2013 morning, the two vessels "MV XIUMEI TIANJIN"  and "JIA LI HAI" collided in sea area of Zhejiang Zhoushan. The DWT 100,000 cargo ship “JIA LI HAI” owned by China COSCO was driving to Laotangshan port when got collision with 168 m long container ship "MV XIUMEI TIANJIN".

Fluyt

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 5, 2013

The fluyt or fluitschip was one of the first ocean-going ships built exclusively for commerce. Previously, ships tended to be built to perform the dual role of fighting battles and carrying cargo. Thus, their construction was fairly robust and they carried cannons, ammunition, and combat personnel.

Long Beach ties itself in knots

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on October 29, 2013

Two issues are needlessly consuming Long Beach’s board of harbor commissioners. A new head office and executive director search are pushing other more important matters out of the way. The head office squabble is taking on ludicrous proportions.

The power play starts at Los Angeles

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on November 26, 2013

When a minor cog in a political machine starts asking whether jobs will be lost at a port because of the drive for greater efficiency, you know there are real problems ahead. That in essence is the situation facing Los Angeles following the…

Sea salp

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 22, 2013

The salp is a marine animal, a member of the subphylum Tunicata. It is a primitive member of the phylum Chordata, which includes all animals with dorsal nerve cords and notocords. Unlike most Chordata, though, the notochord is only present during the larval stage.

Future U.S. Merchant Mariners Deemed Non-Essential

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on October 16, 2013

U.S. Coast Guard veteran, maritime attorney and all-around maritime expert Dennis Bryant stole a bit of my (planned) thunder this week when he pointed out for all to see that both the U.S. Senate and House were crafting corrections to previous legislation that would…

World’s top three betting heavily on P3 tie-up

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on October 1, 2013

Earlier this year, the world’s three top carriers announced they would put their rivalry aside on the east-west trades and combine services in a gigantic container shipping alliance. Switzerland-based MSC and France’s CMA CGM plan to link up with Maersk on the P3…

Prison Ship Martyrs’ Monument

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on September 3, 2013

During the American Revolutionary War, British forces captured thousands of “rebels”. Those in uniform were accorded treatment somewhat akin to prisoner of war status. Those not in uniform, particularly the maritime privateers, were subjected to harsher conditions.

TWIC: Alive and Kicking

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on May 22, 2013

The way forward for homeland security officials seems to be pretty clear when it comes to the much anticipated and often criticized Transportation Worker Identification Card (TWIC). Or maybe not. The U.S. Government Accounting Office (GAO) report…

Ideal X

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 26, 2013

On 26 April 1956, the ship Ideal X departed Port Newark, New Jersey on a voyage to Houston, Texas. The ship had been launched in 1945 as the T-2 tanker SS Potrero Hills. The ship had made many voyages in the intervening eleven years, but this was different.

CG 36500

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 19, 2013

The US Coast Guard motor lifeboat 36500 is the only one of the many hundreds that were built between the 1930s and the 1950s to be placed on the National Register of Historic Places. On 18 February 1952, during a severe winter storm off Cape Cod…

Albatross

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 14, 2012

The albatross is the largest of all birds in terms of wingspan (up to 12 feet). It can be found soaring above all ocean waters of the Southern Hemisphere and above the North Pacific. It is largely absent from the North Atlantic, probably due to loss of habitat.