28705 members and growing – the largest networking group in the maritime industry!

LoginJoin

Tuesday, October 22, 2019

Malacca

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 8, 2014

The Strait of Malacca is named after Malacca, now part of Malaysia. In about the year 1400, Parameswana, the last Raja of Singapura, was expelled from the area around present-day Singapore by local rivals. He relocated to the fishing village of Malacca…

BC Ferries - a Case Study in Blended Maritime Assessment - Part 1

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on April 2, 2012

Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog by following the blog.Share this blog post.Follow me on Twitter.IntroductionAssessment in the maritime industry is a huge subject.

Carriers in for a brutal year as capacity floods in

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on July 4, 2012

Alphaliner’s chart of the week focuses on the new tonnage that has been added by the top 20 container shipping lines in the past 12 months. As incredible as the capacity is – 844,000 TEUs for a fleet growth of 6.4 percent – the one carrier that stands out is CSAV.

China carrier takes industry losses to new lows

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on April 3, 2012

Just when you thought the 2011 shipping industry losses could not possibly get any worse, along comes one of China’s state owned carriers to set the benchmark at a new low. As China’s largest line, that honour naturally fell to Cosco, and the…

Akash Dredging & Marine Services acquire cutter suction dredger

Posted to Akash Dredging & Marine Services acquire cutter suction dredger (by Joseph Fonseca) on February 15, 2012

With the inauguration of their first cutter suction dredger (CSD), AKASH-1 this morning at ABG SHIPYARD, Dahej, Akash Dredging & Marine Services (P) Ltd, Visakhapatnam (ADAMS) has become the new entrant into the dredging arena. The company,…

Pensacola

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 9, 2011

Pensacola is the westernmost city in Florida, nearly extending into Alabama. It is the homeport for a number of fishing vessels and small passenger vessels. One of its claims to fame is that it is the site of the first European settlement in…

USCG Waives Maritime Security Regulations for Some Facilities

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on July 26, 2011

The US Coast has just issued MTSA Policy Advisory Council Decision 02-11 (PAC 02-11), “Waiving Facilities that Transfer Certain Low Risk Commodities.”  Owners/operators of MTSA-regulated facilities that transfer or store bulk commodities that are listed in the Decision as being low risk can…

Maritime Legislative Report Card:

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on January 19, 2011

It wasn’t too long ago that a former key official in the previous administration advised me that the problem with today’s version of the federal government and legislative arms isn’t the lack of passion to get the job done right. Instead, I was told…

APU / Maritime Reporter WEBCAST Series Kicks off in February

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on December 22, 2010

Maritime stakeholders continue to face complex challenges. Maintaining a healthy bottom line in the face of a myriad of regulatory, environmental and operational risks, therefore, has become Job 1. Preventing the loss of vessel and crew from acts of piracy…

Nikumaroro

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 21, 2010

Nikumaroro (previously known as Gardner Island) is a small coral atoll in the central Pacific Ocean situated just south of the Equator and just west of the 180th meridian. It lies in the Phoenix Island Chain and is part of the Republic of Kiribati.

Vizhinjam to become major transshipment port in S. India

Posted to Vizhinjam to become major transshipment port in S. India (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 29, 2010

Vizhinjam, a port located near the Southern tip of India and close to the international shipping route is being developed into a major transshipment port. Once completed it is expected to attract annually over 10,000 ships that is half the number that pass through the Suez Canal.

Back from the (almost) dead

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 5, 2010

The requirement for scanning of 100% of maritime shipping containers in overseas ports prior to loading on a ship bound for the United States was enacted into federal law (with various caveats) by the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007.

One Small Step for the TWIC Program?

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on September 30, 2010

Last week the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) updated its list of TWIC Readers that have successfully completed the Initial Capability Evaluation (ICE) to include an additional hand-held reader. This brings the total of portable…

Plug-in Shore Power

Posted to Marine Propulsion Report (by Keith Henderson) on September 18, 2010

A major factor slowing down the more widespread use of plug-in shore power to permit cold ironing is the lack of a safe, troublesome and easy to use standard for the shore to ship connector. Further complicating the problem is the abundance…

Move to give STCW a slant on learning

Posted to Move to give STCW a slant on learning (by Joseph Fonseca) on September 6, 2010

With near misses and accidents on the rise while at sea, the focus has with intensity come to rest on training and STCW conventions. A lot of soul searching and introspection is taking place with a section of trainers coming to the conclusion…

SOSUS-VENTS

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 27, 2010

The Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS) is a US Navy program, initiated in the early 1950’s, to track Soviet or other potentially hostile submarines. It consists of a series of hydrophones strategically placed on seamounts and continental slopes…

Irano Hind may weather US/EU ban

Posted to Irano Hind may weather US/EU ban (by Joseph Fonseca) on August 2, 2010

The sanctions imposed by the US and the European Union on Iran because of its nuclear ambitions are likely to see the Islamic Republic of Iran Shipping Lines and a number of entities with which it is associated becoming prime targets. For Irano…

Bharati Shipyard in control of Great Offshore

Posted to Bharati Shipyard in control of Great Offshore (by Joseph Fonseca) on May 17, 2010

The battle for Great Offshore, country’s largest integrated offshore services firm, has finally ended with Bharati Shipyard in total control and ABS shipyard left trying to dilute its share holding in the company. Last week Bharati Shipyard…

Turkish Straits

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 20, 2010

The Turkish Straits consist of two narrow straits in northwestern Turkey, the Bosporus and the Dardanelles, and the Sea of Marmara that connects them. The Turkish Straits lie between the Black Sea to the east and the Aegean Sea, which is a region of the much larger Mediterranean Sea.

USCG Districts

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 6, 2010

The US Coast Guard adopted the concept of geographic districts when it absorbed the US Lighthouse Service in 1939. Previously, it had no formal segmentation of its chain of command based on geography. Rather, the chain of command was grouped around function.
  • 1
  • 2