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Sunday, May 24, 2020

Fracking could be the new future for some ports

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on April 28, 2013

Northwest and as the door on a coal terminal closes, another opens for hydraulic fracturing (fracking). Gray’s Harbor, normally associated with autos and breakbulk, is eyeing a huge bonanza in the form of crude-by-rail. The stuff will probably come from the fields…

TAMP to lose its tariff fixing role

Posted to TAMP to lose its tariff fixing role (by Joseph Fonseca) on January 9, 2013

Facing all round flak the government has finally decided curtailing the tariff fixing function of the Tariff Authority for Major Ports (TAMP). This was one of the major decisions taken at the 14 Maritime States Development Council (MSDC) meeting of 8 January 2013. The Union Shipping Minister G.

Abel Tasman

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 4, 2012

Abel Tasman (1603-1659) was a Dutch merchant and explorer. He is credited with the European discovery of Australia and New Zealand. He joined the Dutch United East India Company (Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie - VOC) in 1633 and was promptly…

APU / Maritime Reporter WEBCAST Series Kicks off in February

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on December 22, 2010

Maritime stakeholders continue to face complex challenges. Maintaining a healthy bottom line in the face of a myriad of regulatory, environmental and operational risks, therefore, has become Job 1. Preventing the loss of vessel and crew from acts of piracy…

Strategic Local FPSO Builders Chosen

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on November 15, 2010

There was still a need for a tender process to select which local company would be responsible for the construction process of the first 8 FPSOs to be built from a total of 40 FPSOs originally calculated to be needed for the pre-salt development.

Logistics and Workforce Problems Plaguing Brazil´s O&G Development

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on November 10, 2010

Petrobras was recently upgraded to being the fourth largest energy company in the world, mostly due to the pre-salt fields and there is little doubt in the market that the company can continue climbing this ladder, possibly to the very top, in another decade.

Back from the (almost) dead

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 5, 2010

The requirement for scanning of 100% of maritime shipping containers in overseas ports prior to loading on a ship bound for the United States was enacted into federal law (with various caveats) by the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007.

Petrobras Expands CENPES Research Center

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on October 12, 2010

With the expansion the complex on Fundão Island will occupy more than 300 thousand m² making it one of the largest centers of applied research in the world. There will be various laboratories designed to meet the technological demands of Petrobras’ business areas…

Plug-in Shore Power

Posted to Marine Propulsion Report (by Keith Henderson) on September 18, 2010

A major factor slowing down the more widespread use of plug-in shore power to permit cold ironing is the lack of a safe, troublesome and easy to use standard for the shore to ship connector. Further complicating the problem is the abundance…

Move to give STCW a slant on learning

Posted to Move to give STCW a slant on learning (by Joseph Fonseca) on September 6, 2010

With near misses and accidents on the rise while at sea, the focus has with intensity come to rest on training and STCW conventions. A lot of soul searching and introspection is taking place with a section of trainers coming to the conclusion…

SOSUS-VENTS

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 27, 2010

The Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS) is a US Navy program, initiated in the early 1950’s, to track Soviet or other potentially hostile submarines. It consists of a series of hydrophones strategically placed on seamounts and continental slopes…

USCG Districts

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 6, 2010

The US Coast Guard adopted the concept of geographic districts when it absorbed the US Lighthouse Service in 1939. Previously, it had no formal segmentation of its chain of command based on geography. Rather, the chain of command was grouped around function.